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2008 Holiday Traditions Calendar

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boswellbaxter
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Post by boswellbaxter » Mon December 22nd, 2008, 4:27 pm

[quote=""sweetpotatoboy""]I really enjoyed that! Thanks.[/quote]

Thanks, sweetpotatoboy!
Susan Higginbotham
Coming in October: The Woodvilles


http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/
http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/blog/

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pat
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Post by pat » Tue December 23rd, 2008, 5:43 am

That is so good!!
A good book and a good coffee, what more can anyone want? xx

Carla
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Post by Carla » Tue December 23rd, 2008, 12:06 pm

Well, how do I follow Douglas the Talking Fir and Queen Isabella's round-robin Christmas newsletter?

My Christmas tradition is to make home-made mince pies on Christmas Eve, listening to the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols broadcast on Radio 4 from the chapel of King's College, Cambridge. The unearthly sweetness of the lone chorister singing the first line of Once in Royal David's City somehow signals for me the end of all the frenetic preparations and the beginning of the festival.

Recipe here: http://carlanayland.blogspot.com/2008/1 ... -pies.html

To everyone on the board, have a very happy Christmas, and best wishes for the New Year!
PATHS OF EXILE - love, war, honour and betrayal in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria
Editor's Choice, Historical Novels Review, August 2009
Now available as e-book on Amazon Kindleand in Kindle, Epub (Nook, Sony Reader), Palm and other formats on Smashwords
Website: http://www.carlanayland.org
Blog: http://carlanayland.blogspot.com

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boswellbaxter
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Post by boswellbaxter » Tue December 23rd, 2008, 3:05 pm

[quote=""Carla""]Well, how do I follow Douglas the Talking Fir and Queen Isabella's round-robin Christmas newsletter?

My Christmas tradition is to make home-made mince pies on Christmas Eve, listening to the Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols broadcast on Radio 4 from the chapel of King's College, Cambridge. The unearthly sweetness of the lone chorister singing the first line of Once in Royal David's City somehow signals for me the end of all the frenetic preparations and the beginning of the festival.

Recipe here: http://carlanayland.blogspot.com/2008/1 ... -pies.html

To everyone on the board, have a very happy Christmas, and best wishes for the New Year![/quote]

Yummy looking pies!

I love "Once in Royal David's City." I don't hear it sung nearly as often as I'd like.

Merry Christmas!
Susan Higginbotham
Coming in October: The Woodvilles


http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/
http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/blog/

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Telynor
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Post by Telynor » Thu December 25th, 2008, 5:08 am

First of all, I want to apologize for this being a bit late, but as it is still the Festival of Lights, I hope you will forgive me.

On Hanukah -- it's a pretty minor holiday in the Jewish calendar -- of far greater importance are Rosh haShanah, Yom Kippur and Passover, along the Sabbath. As the calendar is based on the lunar year, it shifts around from late november to late december. The festival lasts for eight nights, with a special emphasis on eating fried foods, the lighting of the chanukiyah, which has nine candles -- one for each night, and the shamash, or 'helper'. On the first night, one candle is lit, using the shamash, (with one more being added each night), and reciting several blessings along with a sip or two of wine, and that's pretty much all that I do. It's customary to play the dreidel game (a four sided top), with peanuts, candies or raisins as the counters, and sometimes gift-giving throughout the festival.

Historically, it is based around the revolt led by Judah and the Maccabees against the Greek conquerors and kicking them out of the holy land. When the Temple in Jerusalem was reconsecrated (it had been converted to a place of worship by the Greeks), it was found to only have enough consecrated oil to light the menorah for just one day -- and it would take more than eight days to make more. But a miracle happened -- the oil was able to last for eight nights. So the holiday.

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Volgadon
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Post by Volgadon » Thu December 25th, 2008, 8:49 am

I dunno, Hanuka is pretty big here in Israel. Children absolutely love it as they can eat doughnuts, light candles and get presents. We also had holiday pageants in school.

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Thu December 25th, 2008, 2:37 pm

Managed to sneak away to the PC while the dh is take his father in law to the pub (long standing tradition in his family at least, :) ). We're not eating Xmas dinner until tonight as our younger son who lives at home is working a 12 hour shift today.
Anyway, thank you for the Channukah traditions. I do enjoy learning about cultures and religions that are not on my own immediate radar.
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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Telynor
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Post by Telynor » Thu December 25th, 2008, 9:23 pm

[quote=""Volgadon""]I dunno, Hanuka is pretty big here in Israel. Children absolutely love it as they can eat doughnuts, light candles and get presents. We also had holiday pageants in school.[/quote]

Yes, but that's _Israel_ (you lucky soul). Here, not so much, at least in the communities that I've been involved with.

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pat
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Post by pat » Fri December 26th, 2008, 7:14 am

Thanks Telynor. I never knew about the fried foods bit, but now little things I have seen make sense!
A good book and a good coffee, what more can anyone want? xx

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Volgadon
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Post by Volgadon » Fri December 26th, 2008, 8:43 am

Doughnuts (the Eastern European kind) and latkes (grated potato pancakes) are the two most popular dishes, but there are many, many more.
It is interesting that a lot of the traditions developed to counter Christmas, or rather, St Nicholas's feast day. Hanuka gelt for instance. To stop their kids from being upset that they weren't celebrating those holidays like their Christian neighbours, no fun, no parties, no gifts, they decided to give them gifts.

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