Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

This Day in History

For discussions of historical fiction. Threads that do not relate to historical fiction should be started in the Chat forum or elsewhere on the forum, depending on the topic.
Ash
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 2475
Joined: August 2008
Location: Arizona, USA

Post by Ash » Thu December 11th, 2008, 12:17 pm

[quote=""Alaric""]December 11: Llywelyn the Last is killed, Louis XVI is put on trial for treason while the United States declares war on Italy and Germany.[/quote]

That episode and others regarding the fall of Wales is so well written in Penman's Reckoning. I cried for days, it seemed.

User avatar
Rowan
Bibliophile
Posts: 1462
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
Location: New Orleans
Contact:

Post by Rowan » Thu December 11th, 2008, 2:09 pm

Varro (116-29 B.C.) -- most learned of the Romans -- says the name of Rome was once Septimontium. This would have been before the people living on or around the 7 (septem) hills (montes) called their city Rome. This is also the name of a December 11 festival which included a walk around the hills. In A Topographical Dictionary of Ancient Rome (London: Oxford University Press, 1929), Samuel Ball Platner says Roman antiquarians believed the festival was based on the inclusion within the Roman city limits of the seven hills. There is debate over which hills were included.

User avatar
Margaret
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 2440
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: I can't answer this in 100 characters. Sorry.
Favourite HF book: Checkmate, the final novel in the Lymond series
Preferred HF: Literary novels. Late medieval and Renaissance.
Location: Catskill, New York, USA
Contact:

Post by Margaret » Fri December 12th, 2008, 5:43 am

Ah, a moment of silence for dear old Llywelyn the Last. I loved him in Pargeter's gigantic Brothers of Gwynedd Quartet.

On December 11, 1936, (so Wikipedia tells me) Edward VIII's abdication of the throne of England became effective.
Browse over 5000 historical novel listings (probably well over 5000 by now, but I haven't re-counted lately) and over 700 reviews at www.HistoricalNovels.info

annis
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4585
Joined: August 2008

Post by annis » Fri December 12th, 2008, 6:23 am

December 11, 1901
Marconi sends 1st transatlantic radio signal, Cornwall to Nfld

I recently read Erik Larsen's non-fiction book "Thunderstruck", the fscinating story of how Marconi's telegraph was instrumental in the capture of British murderer Dr Crippen.

User avatar
SonjaMarie
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 5688
Joined: August 2008
Location: Vashon, WA
Contact:

Post by SonjaMarie » Fri December 12th, 2008, 6:31 am

[quote=""annis""]December 11, 1901
Marconi sends 1st transatlantic radio signal, Cornwall to Nfld

I recently read Erik Larsen's non-fiction book "Thunderstruck", the fscinating story of how Marconi's telegraph was instrumental in the capture of British murderer Dr Crippen.[/quote]

That sounds like a good book, I'm going to add it to my BF queue.

SM
The Lady Jane Grey Internet Museum
My Booksfree Queue

Original Join Date: Mar 2006
Previous Amount of Posts: 2,517
Books Read In 2014: 109 - June: 17 (May: 17)
Full List Here: http://www.historicalfictiononline.com/ ... p?p=114965

chuck
Bibliophile
Posts: 1073
Joined: August 2008
Location: Ciinaminson NJ

Post by chuck » Tue December 16th, 2008, 4:44 am

December 15th....The film "Gone With the Wind" premiers in Atlanta Georgia 1939......Today it still resonates ......

User avatar
Rowan
Bibliophile
Posts: 1462
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
Location: New Orleans
Contact:

Post by Rowan » Tue December 16th, 2008, 5:48 pm

As far as national holidays go, the Fourth of July gets all the fanfare. True, the signing of the Declaration of Independence and breaking away from British control was an amazing triumph—and it's doubtful that any American will complain about getting a day off work to blow up things and eat hot dogs. But shouldn't there be more of a celebration to honor Dec. 15, 1791, when American conceptions of individual liberty and limited government became the law of the land?

On this day 217 years ago, Virginia became the 10th of 14 states to ratify the first 10 amendments to the U.S. Constitution, known collectively as the Bill of Rights. With it, American citizens were granted—among others—the freedoms of speech, press, and religion; protection against unreasonable searches and seizures; the privilege against self-incrimination; and the right to counsel, to a speedy and public trial, and to a trial by jury.

Yet despite being declared Bill of Rights Day by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1941 to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the ratification, Dec. 15 often goes unnoticed. Don't let Bill of Rights Day be overlooked this year. Celebrate in Fourth of July fashion with a parade, barbecue, and fireworks. Just make sure not to shoot your eye out.

annis
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4585
Joined: August 2008

Post by annis » Sat December 27th, 2008, 5:47 pm

Today (in NZ) is Sunday, 28 December, and on this day in 1065 Westminster Abbey, the great stone cathedral commissioned by King Edward the Confessor, was consecrated- just in time for his funeral a week later.

User avatar
diamondlil
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 2642
Joined: August 2008

Post by diamondlil » Sat December 27th, 2008, 10:53 pm

Dec 28 is Proclamation Day in South Australia. On this day in 1836 Adelaide was officially settled. The interesting thing about Adelaide in terms of colonisation is that it is the only state in Australia that was founded with only free settlers - not prisoners.
My Blog - Reading Adventures

All things Historical Fiction - Historical Tapestry


There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

annis
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4585
Joined: August 2008

Post by annis » Mon December 29th, 2008, 2:19 am

"Who will rid me of this meddlesome priest?" Words King Henry II would come to bitterly regret.
On December 29, 1170, four knights took Henry at his word and murdered Henry's former friend, Thomas a Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, at the altar steps of Canterbury Cathedral, ensuring his status as a martyr.
http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/becket.htm

Post Reply

Return to “General Discussion”