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Title Question

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diamondlil
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Title Question

Post by diamondlil » Sun November 23rd, 2008, 11:24 am

Someone on a blog I read asked the following question the other day, and now I am curious myself. Does anyone know if there is a specific term?

What is the literary term for that part of a novel where the line that contains the title of the novel appears?

Like the part of To Kill A Mockingbird where Atticus lectures Jem on the use of his new shotgun saying he can shoot all the blue jays (?) he wants, but it's a sin to kill a mockingbird... Or the part of Gone With The Wind where Scarlett has fled Atlanta and is trying to get home to Tara and her mother and she wonders if Tara is still standing, or is it gone with the wind that has swept through Georgia...

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michellemoran
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Post by michellemoran » Sun November 23rd, 2008, 6:38 pm

Great question! I'm not sure I've ever heard of a literary term for that. Are you sure there is one?
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annis
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Post by annis » Sun November 23rd, 2008, 7:38 pm

I've never come cross such a term. Often the phrase used for a title will not appear in the main body of a book at all, though it may be attributed as a quotation from another book, play or poem somewhere at the beginning or end .

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Post by Divia » Sun November 23rd, 2008, 8:08 pm

Like the others I never heard of a term for it. But I'd be interestedto find out :)
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Julianne Douglas
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Post by Julianne Douglas » Tue November 25th, 2008, 5:21 am

Diamondlil, in all my years of graduate work in literature, I don't recall ever coming across a word for what you describe. That doesn't mean there isn't one, of course, but it must be very obscure if there is. I'll be curious to learn if anyone unearths one. It sounds like something that should have its own term, if it doesn't. :)
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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Tue November 25th, 2008, 1:56 pm

I've got my trusty magnifying glass and am on the hunt for the answer...

In the mean time I've come across some new literary terms I'd never heard before. Favourite amongst them is synecdoche. :)

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Tue November 25th, 2008, 2:53 pm

I can't believe annis didn't have the answer. She usually finds everything :o :p

Did you try ask.com?

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Tue November 25th, 2008, 3:47 pm

I've tried ask.com and no such luck, but maybe my query is too complex.

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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Wed November 26th, 2008, 10:50 am

[quote=""Rowan""]I've got my trusty magnifying glass and am on the hunt for the answer...

In the mean time I've come across some new literary terms I'd never heard before. Favourite amongst them is synecdoche. :)
[/quote]

And what, pray tell, is a synecdoche?

There definitely should be a word. I love it when you are reading a book and suddenly you have that moment of recognition when you see where the title comes from!

Maybe we will have to make one up!
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Post by Carla » Wed November 26th, 2008, 4:18 pm

[quote=""diamondlil""]And what, pray tell, is a synecdoche?

There definitely should be a word. I love it when you are reading a book and suddenly you have that moment of recognition when you see where the title comes from!

Maybe we will have to make one up![/quote]

Maybe we will! If the title is a person's name (e.g. Anya Seton's Katherine), eponym might come close, but even then it isn't quite right.
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