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Anne Easter Smith

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diamondlil
Bibliomaniac

Postby diamondlil » Tue March 10th, 2009, 8:30 pm

Still haven't read the second book, but have just read an interview that Michelle Moran did with this author, and I am very excited at the prospect of her next book being about Cecilly Neville!
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There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

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Susan
Bibliomaniac
Location: New Jersey, USA

Postby Susan » Tue March 10th, 2009, 9:07 pm

"diamondlil" wrote:Still haven't read the second book, but have just read an interview that Michelle Moran did with this author, and I am very excited at the prospect of her next book being about Cecilly Neville!


Ooooh, I love that idea too!
~Susan~
~Unofficial Royalty~
Royal news updated daily, information and discussion about royalty past and present
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Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: The Year That Changed Everything by Cathy Kelly
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favorite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Postby Vanessa » Wed March 11th, 2009, 8:45 am

I've never read any of this author's books, but I do love the covers! I'm attracted to them by that alone, hence a couple being on my TBR pile. :o :D
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

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zsigandr
Avid Reader
Location: Ontario, Canada

Postby zsigandr » Tue April 14th, 2009, 11:19 pm

I too was drawn to the covers of her books. I picked up A Rose for the Crown about 2 years ago at a book clearance centre and it was the best $4.95 I have spent! :D

I have since read Daughter of York and tend to agree with some of the others that it was not quite as good as A Rose for the Crown. I am now half way through The King's Grace and am loving it.

I look forward to her book on Cecily Neville as well!
Andrea

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Juniper
Scribbler
Interest in HF: I studied English Literature and History at college. Historical fiction blends my two passions together in one neat package.
Location: Missouri, USA
Contact:

Postby Juniper » Wed April 15th, 2009, 6:16 pm

"zsigandr" wrote:I too was drawn to the covers of her books. I picked up A Rose for the Crown about 2 years ago at a book clearance centre and it was the best $4.95 I have spent! :D

I have since read Daughter of York and tend to agree with some of the others that it was not quite as good as A Rose for the Crown. I am now half way through The King's Grace and am loving it.

I look forward to her book on Cecily Neville as well!
Andrea


I loved A Rose for the Crown, but have not read Daughter of York as so many people told me that they were disappointed with it.

I have just finished reading The King's Grace, and I thought it was very well-written and had some interesting takes on the Warbeck episode. In truth I prefered A Rose for the Crown, but I think that is because I prefered the protagonist in that book.

I too am looking forward to her book about Proud Cis!

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zsigandr
Avid Reader
Location: Ontario, Canada

Postby zsigandr » Sat May 9th, 2009, 5:41 pm

Juniper - I have read Daughter of York and while I did not like it as much as A Rose for the Crown (loved Katherine Haute) it was interesting to learn about Edward and Richard's sister Margaret, whose character appears again in The King's Grace. The Margaret in Daughter of York is much more sympathetic though, as in The King's Grace she is older and seems much more calculating and manipulative.

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Margaret
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: I can't answer this in 100 characters. Sorry.
Favorite HF book: Checkmate, the final novel in the Lymond series
Preferred HF: Literary novels. Late medieval and Renaissance.
Location: Catskill, New York, USA
Contact:

Postby Margaret » Sun May 10th, 2009, 1:44 am

I'm reading The King's Grace right now. It's the first of her novels I've read, and it hasn't really grabbed me yet - a lot of backstory in the early chapters. But my husband saw it lying around and read the first 40 pages and said he really likes it - this is a man who mostly reads novels about submarine warfare! So I am adjusting my attitude. I'm interested in the whole Perkin Warbeck episode, and she hasn't really gotten around to that yet, so that's probably why I'm feeling impatient. Hopefully, the story will pick up for me once Perkin comes into the story more actively.
Browse over 5000 historical novel listings and over 650 reviews at www.HistoricalNovels.info

Chatterbox
Bibliophile
Location: New York

Postby Chatterbox » Fri May 15th, 2009, 2:49 pm

I enjoyed her first book, quite liked the Margaret of York book (despite the romantic plot being a bit too much of a stretch) and ended up thinking it wasn't nearly good. The third book? I struggled to finish it. It felt... perfunctory? I never really got caught up in the story in any way. Grace just wasn't a convincing character, and her quest for identity was implausible for the time & place, IMO. I suppose my essential problem was combination of one-dimensional characterizations with plots stretched to fit around known facts. If I read the Cecily Neville novel, it will only be because I'm curious about the subject, not because I'm interested in reading more by the author. Which is a bit sad, as typically these are books I would gravitate to.

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Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Fri May 15th, 2009, 3:56 pm

The King's Grace did wall damage around page 100. I won't go spoiling it for those who haven't read it but there was a scene between Henry VII and Elizabeth that well......I guess I was not quite expecting that. We discussed this over at the R3 group at Good Reads and from what I gathered on the way things ended up and being told from Grace's POV I decided it wasn't worth the effort to continue. Too many books, too little time.
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be

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Margaret
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: I can't answer this in 100 characters. Sorry.
Favorite HF book: Checkmate, the final novel in the Lymond series
Preferred HF: Literary novels. Late medieval and Renaissance.
Location: Catskill, New York, USA
Contact:

Postby Margaret » Fri May 15th, 2009, 10:23 pm

I finally finished The King's Grace, and I don't think it's a spoiler (perhaps rather the opposite) to point out that this novel is really about Grace Plantagenet and Elizabeth Woodville. It's being promoted as a novel about Grace and Perkin Warbeck, but Perkin Warbeck has a very subsidiary role in the novel and doesn't become important until somewhere around page 400. If I had known that when I started reading, I might have felt less impatient and annoyed with the pace of the novel, although it's not one that will go on my "Best of 2009" list.
Browse over 5000 historical novel listings and over 650 reviews at www.HistoricalNovels.info


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