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Kings and Brain Damage (not to mention politicians)

For discussions of historical fiction. Threads that do not relate to historical fiction should be started in the Chat forum or elsewhere on the forum, depending on the topic.
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Alaric
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Post by Alaric » Tue November 18th, 2008, 8:40 am

Peter the Great similarly witnessed half his Naryshkin family being murdered during the Streltsyi uprising. Little wonder he became so determined to have his way throughout his reign.

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Tue November 18th, 2008, 11:19 am

The article sounds to be somewhat over-egging the case to me. In fact I think as a reason it's utter rot.
William Marshal got his head trapped inside a helm due to a battering he'd taken, and had to have said helm removed on the anvil by a blacksmith. It wasn't the only time it happened. He appears to have remained perfectly sane and level-headed right up to his demise, probably from cancer at the age of 72. By the time of King Henry VIII, knightly training, while part of a young aristocrat's regime, was not the be-all and end-all of his life. The Marshal was a younger son of a middle-ranking baron who had no option but to fight for his living. The son of a king would learn to fight, but not be doing it day in and day out. He wouldn't have had the crap beaten out of him, drop down and have the crap beaten out of him again. That's ridiculous to say so and suggests that the author doesn't know much about medieval armour or lifestyle to begin with. The helm would be well padded inside for starters and Henry would have more to do in a day than soak up punishment on a training ground.
Henry would be au fait with weapons yes, and I know he jousted in his younger days. Prince Charles plays Polo. Same difference (okay jousting's a tad more dangerous, but Henry wouldn't have spent all of his time practising). These things need putting in perspective. If Henry was a bad-tempered crabby old git by the time he died, I doubt it was down to being clobbered round the helm. :mad:
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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Julianne Douglas
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Post by Julianne Douglas » Tue November 18th, 2008, 3:39 pm

Michelle, thanks for passing on that fascinating theory. I'm constantly amazed at how people did survive back in the old days!

SonjaMarie, may I ask what book you're reading? The info about Charles V would be crucial for the novel I'm working on.
Julianne Douglas

Writing the Renaissance

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SonjaMarie
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Post by SonjaMarie » Tue November 18th, 2008, 5:53 pm

[quote=""Julianne Douglas""]SonjaMarie, may I ask what book you're reading? The info about Charles V would be crucial for the novel I'm working on.[/quote]

Julianne: I'm reading "The Serpent and the Moon: Two Rivals For the Love Of A Renaissance King" by HRH Princess Michael of Kent.

SM
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Volgadon
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Post by Volgadon » Tue November 18th, 2008, 8:40 pm

Well put EC!

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Post by annis » Tue November 18th, 2008, 9:37 pm

If Henry was a bad-tempered crabby old git by the time he died, I doubt it was down to being clobbered round the helm
Love the bad-tempered crabby old git, EC! Though it might be significant that he was a bad-tempered crabby fat old git-- the diabetes theory sounds like a possibility to me.

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Julianne Douglas
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Post by Julianne Douglas » Tue November 18th, 2008, 9:46 pm

Thanks, SonjaMarie. I though that might be it. I haven't read it and have heard mixed reviews about it. How are you finding it?
Julianne Douglas

Writing the Renaissance

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SonjaMarie
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Post by SonjaMarie » Tue November 18th, 2008, 11:04 pm

[quote=""Julianne Douglas""]Thanks, SonjaMarie. I though that might be it. I haven't read it and have heard mixed reviews about it. How are you finding it?[/quote]

Julianne: I just finished it today, and I enjoyed it, it was an easy read.

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