Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

What Movies Have You Seen Lately?

User avatar
fljustice
Bibliophile
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Contact:

Postby fljustice » Sat December 10th, 2011, 5:07 pm

"Nefret" wrote:It certainly made more interested in Hypatia.


Tons of Hypatia stuff on my blog! ;) I also reviewed a couple of Hypatia biographies here on HFO:

http://www.historicalfictiononline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4459
http://www.historicalfictiononline.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4460


As to other movies, we saw a brilliant one last night The Artist--a modern black and white silent film (with recorded music score and occasional dialog frame) set during the silent film era. Any movie lover, must see this one. The homages just keep coming and coming. This isn't a spoof or parody; it's a serious film made in the old style by people who obviously love movies. A real treat!
Faith L. Justice, Author Website
User signature picture

User avatar
Nefret
Bibliomaniac
Favorite HF book: Welsh Princes trilogy
Preferred HF: The Middle Ages (England), New Kingdom Egypt, Medieval France
Location: Temple of Isis

Postby Nefret » Sat December 10th, 2011, 5:18 pm

Thanks. She (and her astronomy) was my favourite part of that movie.
Into battle we ride with Gods by our side
We are strong and not afraid to die
We have an urge to kill and our lust for blood has to be fulfilled
WE´LL FIGHT TILL THE END! And send our enemies straight to Hell!
- "Into Battle"
{Ensiferum}

User avatar
sweetpotatoboy
Bibliophile
Location: London, UK

Postby sweetpotatoboy » Tue December 13th, 2011, 12:02 pm

"DianeL" wrote:There's also acres of fun to be had with the Hepburn/O'Toole version, watching Katherine Hepburn say the most SCANDALOUS things about Geoffrey Plantagenet and her nipples. Oh yes. I said nipples.


I've now seen the 1968 movie as well. I thought it was great. Yes, all the hilarious lines that I saw in the play are there in the movie and it would be difficult to miss the humour. However, as a movie, with no audience to play to, it is played a bit less obviously for laughs and you have to catch yourself: did she really just say that?

The cast is overall excellent in the movie - and the younger characters were played much better than in the theatre production I just saw.

I was interested in the ages of the actors and did a bit of research. In 1968, Katherine Hepburn (playing Eleanor) was 61 and Peter O'Toole (playing Henry) was 36.

This seems a bit mismatched. BUT, Henry is supposed to be 50 at the time (he says so explicitly at one point) and Peter O'Toole certainly looks around that in the movie; presumably they aged him up subtly. Eleanor was about 11 years his senior, so Katherine Hepburn is actually spot on for that.

Anthony Hopkins (playing Richard) was 31 in 1968, which makes him not much younger than the actor playing his father. Richard would have been about 25 or 26 at the time, so Hopkins looks a little older than that, but it generally works.

Timothy Dalton is a revelation in his first role as Philip of France.

I was wondering, after seeing the current theatre production, how overt the sexual history between Richard and Philip was in the original play and in the 1968 movie. In the play I saw, it was pretty full-on, but not done convincingly: all the innuendo leading up to it was lost unless you were on the lookout for it, so when it materialises, it's a bit weird. However, I was somewhat surprised to see how upfront the 1968 movie was on the subject and it's clearly a plot element that isn't shied away from. All in all, the movie is quite racy, though more in dialogue than action.

Coincidentally, at our HNS London chapter meeting this weekend, we had to give examples of Christmas scenes in historical fiction. So it was quite topical that I'd just seen this play and movie and quoted some of my favourite lines from it. Of course, it is ridiculously anachronistic in its depiction of Christmas. There's a big Christmas tree and decorations and Eleanor's busy wrapping presents for all the family and attaching gift labels and putting them under the tree. I'm no expert on the history of Christmas celebrations in England, but I'm pretty sure this isn't accurate for 1183! But, then, I don't think James Goldman was unaware of this and wasn't bothered on this point.

User avatar
LoveHistory
Bibliomaniac
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Contact:

Postby LoveHistory » Tue December 13th, 2011, 1:55 pm

Love Comes Softly. Pretty good. I really liked the locations.

User avatar
MLE (Emily Cotton)
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favorite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Postby MLE (Emily Cotton) » Wed December 14th, 2011, 5:01 am

Temple Grandin. Very good, especially Clare Dane's performance.

SuzyQ
Scribbler
Location: NJ

Postby SuzyQ » Wed December 14th, 2011, 5:08 am

I watched the first 3 movies in the Love Comes Softly series, but it seemed like they were starting to go downhill by the third one, so I haven't bothered to watch the rest. I definitely want to get around to reading the books at some point. The Little House on the Prairie series were some of my favorite books growing up, so I have a fondness for that era. I even once went to De Smet, South Dakota!
Currently reading A Celt in Rome

User avatar
LoveHistory
Bibliomaniac
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Contact:

Postby LoveHistory » Wed December 14th, 2011, 6:25 pm

"SuzyQ" wrote:I watched the first 3 movies in the Love Comes Softly series, but it seemed like they were starting to go downhill by the third one, so I haven't bothered to watch the rest. I definitely want to get around to reading the books at some point. The Little House on the Prairie series were some of my favorite books growing up, so I have a fondness for that era. I even once went to De Smet, South Dakota!


I'd love to go to the homestead in Pepin, WI. It's a couple hours' drive from here. Every year the city of Pepin has a Laura Ingalls Wilder festival. Of course I'd probably want to go on a different weekend than the festival. Too many people.

User avatar
fljustice
Bibliophile
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Contact:

Postby fljustice » Wed December 14th, 2011, 7:45 pm

"MLE" wrote:Temple Grandin. Very good, especially Clare Dane's performance.


We met Ms. Danes when she was prepping for the role. She spent an afternoon with my daughter and a friend of hers from school (both girls are Aspies.) Ms. Danes was a delight; very friendly, open and tolerant. When we watched the movie, my husband and I both thought she "channelled" the friend. It was spooky! Also fun to see our daughter and her friend listed in the credits. New Yorkers tend to be jaded about celebrity sightings, but this was special!
Faith L. Justice, Author Website

User signature picture

User avatar
LoveHistory
Bibliomaniac
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Contact:

Postby LoveHistory » Mon December 19th, 2011, 5:04 pm

Dying Young. Didn't really want to watch it. Thought it would be depressing. It was.

SuzyQ
Scribbler
Location: NJ

Postby SuzyQ » Mon December 19th, 2011, 8:33 pm

Just saw Sherlock Holmes: A Game of Shadows over the weekend. I didn't see the first one, but I thought it was an interesting take on the character - manic, bohemian, and kind of an action star. The last time I read a Sherlock Holmes story was back in high school so I barely remember it, but it seemed like one could argue that Robert Downey Jr.'s portrayal is true to the spirit of the original books.
Currently reading A Celt in Rome


Return to “Movies, Television, Radio, and Music”