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What Movies Have You Seen Lately?

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Alisha Marie Klapheke
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Location: Franklin, TN
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Postby Alisha Marie Klapheke » Fri August 26th, 2011, 11:47 pm

Currently watching Pinnochio with the kids. I love the classic Disney stuff.

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LoveHistory
Bibliomaniac
Location: Wisconsin, USA
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Postby LoveHistory » Sat August 27th, 2011, 12:47 am

Night at the Museum. Cute movie.

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DianeL
Bibliophile
Location: Midatlantic east coast, United States
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Postby DianeL » Sat August 27th, 2011, 1:06 am

A 1932 Cary Grant called "Hot Saturday" - one of those pre-code teasers with all sorts of adorable cloche hats, silk undies, copious drinking by young and lovely people - all ending in a nice, wholesome marriage. Because: of course! And I'm having a bit of a pre-code party on Netflix these days.

For those unfamiliar with the term, "pre-code" refers to films produced before the Hays Code, a repressive and moralistic set of rules constraining Hollywood from the 1930s and through several decades, which has convinced many people that "early" Hollywood movies were themselves repressed and moralistic. Pre-code films, though, feature some rather eye-opening content, often simply for the sake of titillation; and usually go a long way to make those discovering them come to the understanding that "our generation" (whichever one that may be) didn't invent sex, physical highs, nor the concept of illicit.
"To be the queen, she agreed to be the widow!"

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The pre-modern world was willing to attribute charisma to women well before it was willing to attribute sustained rationality to them.
---Medieval Kingship, Henry A. Myers

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http://dianelmajor.blogspot.com/
I'm a Twit: @DianeLMajor

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LoveHistory
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Location: Wisconsin, USA
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Postby LoveHistory » Sat August 27th, 2011, 9:51 pm

Peter Pan. Live action one with Jason Isaacs as Captain Hook. Quite good. I'm planning to hit Pericles this evening, unless I'm too tired.

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fljustice
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Location: Brooklyn, NY
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Postby fljustice » Sun August 28th, 2011, 4:14 pm

Watched Mary and Max while waiting for Irene to blow in. A strange but moving claymation story about a young girl in Australia who becomes a penpal with an obese man in New York in the seventies. Philip Seymour Hoffman does the voice of Max.
Faith L. Justice, Author Website
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Nefret
Bibliomaniac
Favorite HF book: Welsh Princes trilogy
Preferred HF: The Middle Ages (England), New Kingdom Egypt, Medieval France
Location: Temple of Isis

Postby Nefret » Mon August 29th, 2011, 3:55 pm

"LoveHistory" wrote:Night at the Museum. Cute movie.


Those are amusing movies... I like the second one.
Into battle we ride with Gods by our side
We are strong and not afraid to die
We have an urge to kill and our lust for blood has to be fulfilled
WE´LL FIGHT TILL THE END! And send our enemies straight to Hell!
- "Into Battle"
{Ensiferum}

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Location: Arizona, USA

Postby Ash » Tue August 30th, 2011, 12:43 am

Diane, my husband and I love Cary Grant, and we watched several of his movies on TCM last weekend. Not sure if that one was on at the time, but we've seen it before. Great fun!

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DianeL
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Location: Midatlantic east coast, United States
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Postby DianeL » Tue August 30th, 2011, 1:42 am

The second pre-code on this disc was "Torch Singer" which was a LOT more scandalous (Claudette Colbert opens the film at the free clinic!) but definitely fun. She gets a workout in this one - and so does the wardrobe department. Ahh, glorious 1930s fashion. Love it.
"To be the queen, she agreed to be the widow!"



***



The pre-modern world was willing to attribute charisma to women well before it was willing to attribute sustained rationality to them.

---Medieval Kingship, Henry A. Myers



***



http://dianelmajor.blogspot.com/

I'm a Twit: @DianeLMajor

Eigon
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Location: Hay-on-Wye, Town of Books
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Postby Eigon » Tue August 30th, 2011, 6:41 pm

I must be the last Rosemary Sutcliff fan in the country to watch The Eagle, partly because I was nervous about what it would do to a much loved book.

Last night I finally got round to it - and found that the story had been pared right down to the bone. The whole emphasis is on the relationship between Marcus and Esca, (and the quest for the Eagle, of course) with no room for anything else.*
Uncle Aquila, played by Donald Sutherland, though, is just perfect, and at least they kept Marcus's wooden bird, though they changed the significance of it somewhat to fit the theme. For the film, it was all about honour - Marcus working to restore the honour of his family name, Esca sticking to his vow to serve Marcus through thick and thin, and the remnant of the Ninth Legion keeping faith with their Eagle at the last.
So, all in all, the film loses a lot of the subtlety (and characters!) of the book, and gains a few fight scenes, but it's still a pretty good film, with gorgeous landscapes, and good period detail (okay, the Seal People look a bit outlandish, but the scene where they're dancing round the eagle standard looked to me as if it had come straight out of the book!).
It was interesting, too, to see what a very devout young man Marcus was in the film, with a lot of serious prayer to Mithras going on.
"There were no full time Vikings back then. Everybody had another job."
Neil Gaiman, from Odd and the Frost Giants.

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wendy
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Location: Charlotte, North Carolina
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Postby wendy » Wed August 31st, 2011, 12:55 pm

"MLE" wrote:I went to see The Help. Great job, it caught the book's tension, the fear in all those maids.


I agree. They really managed to bring the characters to life.
Wendy K. Perriman
Fire on Dark Water (Penguin, 2011)
http://www.wendyperriman.com
http://www.FireOnDarkWater.com


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