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What Movies Have You Seen Lately?

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Amanda
Compulsive Reader
Location: Sydney, Australia

Postby Amanda » Fri February 4th, 2011, 6:00 am

"Tanzanite" wrote:The Henry VIII movie was one from 1933 - tried to watch it but had to turn it off after about 20 minutes (even though there were some funny lines).

Been watching The Shadow of the Tower. The production is pretty low budget but the story is very detailed. I think you definately have to have a basic knowledge of the latter part of Richard III's reign and the main players around Richard and Henry.


That would be the one with Charles Laughton I think. All I can remember about it is a funny scene were he is trying to sneak into Katherine Howards rooms, and he keeps hiding from them.

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princess garnet
Bibliophile
Location: Maryland

Postby princess garnet » Fri February 4th, 2011, 10:07 pm

The actress who played Anne of Cleves was Charles Laughton's wife in real life

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LoveHistory
Bibliomaniac
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Contact:

Postby LoveHistory » Thu February 10th, 2011, 2:16 pm

The Ultimate Gift. Beautiful and very touching. Moved me to tears (which doesn't happen often when I watch movies).

The Girl Most Likely Too... Disturbing. Thought it was a comedy. I suppose maybe it is, but certainly not my kind of comedy.

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fljustice
Bibliophile
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Contact:

Postby fljustice » Thu February 10th, 2011, 5:16 pm

Sense and Sensibility - the BBC Masterpiece Classic version. Our local PBS station did an Austen marathon counter programming to the Superbowl. I loved the Emma Thompson/Kate Winslet version. This one held up.

Last night saw The Time Traveler's Wife. I enjoyed the book and the movie made me cry. But sappy love stories always do!
Faith L. Justice, Author Website
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Ariadne
Bibliophile
Location: At the foothills of Mt. Level

Postby Ariadne » Fri February 11th, 2011, 1:39 am

I saw The Last Station on DVD last weekend. I'd known little of Tolstoy's life before watching the film and found it absolutely fascinating.

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Nefret
Bibliomaniac
Favorite HF book: Welsh Princes trilogy
Preferred HF: The Middle Ages (England), New Kingdom Egypt, Medieval France
Location: Temple of Isis

Postby Nefret » Fri February 11th, 2011, 5:39 am

"fljustice" wrote:Sense and Sensibility - the BBC Masterpiece Classic version. Our local PBS station did an Austen marathon counter programming to the Superbowl. I loved the Emma Thompson/Kate Winslet version. This one held up.


I liked both versions.
Into battle we ride with Gods by our side
We are strong and not afraid to die
We have an urge to kill and our lust for blood has to be fulfilled
WE´LL FIGHT TILL THE END! And send our enemies straight to Hell!
- "Into Battle"
{Ensiferum}

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Madeleine
Bibliomaniac
Currently reading: Sycamore Gap by L J Ross & The Furthest Station by Ben Aaronovitch
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Postby Madeleine » Fri February 11th, 2011, 12:55 pm

"fljustice" wrote:Sense and Sensibility - the BBC Masterpiece Classic version. Our local PBS station did an Austen marathon counter programming to the Superbowl. I loved the Emma Thompson/Kate Winslet version. This one held up.


That's my favourite Austen adap. I just love the bit when Emma bursts into tears when Hugh Grant finally proposes :D
Currently reading "Sycamore Gap" by L J Ross & "The Furthest Station" by Ben Aaronovitch

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LoveHistory
Bibliomaniac
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Contact:

Postby LoveHistory » Fri February 11th, 2011, 4:49 pm

The Emma Thompson version is the best book-to-screen adaptation I've ever seen. The BBC is closer to the book. I love them both.

Ruth Sims
Scribbler
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Tristan and Isolde

Postby Ruth Sims » Sat February 12th, 2011, 6:14 pm

I had never even heard of the film Tristan and Isolde (2006) and had never heard of James Franco, Sophia Myles, or Rufus Sewell. (you can tell I don't get out much!) OMG. It's violent, romantic, wonderful. Ack. I just tried to edit and correct my misspelling in the header but couldn't figure out how. Sorry.

I write in the Victorian era, and know little of the medieval world, but between this movie and Nan Hawthorne's books, I am now interested in both.

Does anyone here, who is an expert in things medieval, know if the setting, clothing, etc., are authentic? They certainly looked authentic to me, but I know filmmakers do tend to change things. The only thing I noticed that seem a little weird is the same thing I notice in all historical films: the perfect, snow-white teeth of the lead actors.

Did you ever notice that villains in films and television tend to have very ugly teeth? The more evil they are, the worse their teeth look. I guess being evil doesn't leave you much time to floss.
Last edited by SonjaMarie on Sat February 12th, 2011, 8:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
Bibliomaniac
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favorite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Postby MLE (Emily Cotton) » Sat February 12th, 2011, 7:42 pm

"Ruth Sims" wrote:I guess being evil doesn't leave you much time to floss.

LOL! Tidy teeth are very much a modern phenomenon, but I always hesitate to give my attractive characters bad teeth. I confess to many a mention that the bad guys/girl's breath reeks when I am trying to bring up an emotion of disgust in the reader.

I almost never put titles on my comments. Only the moderators can edit them.


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