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The Wise Woman

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aessea1001
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The Wise Woman

Post by aessea1001 » Sun November 9th, 2008, 10:15 pm

Just wondering, has anyone read this one? I recently bought it, (although I had to special-order it from my local Barnes&Noble), and I've read the first 50-something pages...I have to say it's pretty good so far. Maybe this book's not very common in the States, (I'm guessing/assuming?) but I'm wondering nonetheless. :)

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Sun November 9th, 2008, 11:01 pm

[quote=""aessea1001""]Just wondering, has anyone read this one? I recently bought it, (although I had to special-order it from my local Barnes&Noble), and I've read the first 50-something pages...I have to say it's pretty good so far. Maybe this book's not very common in the States, (I'm guessing/assuming?) but I'm wondering nonetheless. :) [/quote]

First of all welcome aessea! :D
Yes, I read and very much enjoyed The Wise Woman some years ago now. I know some members of the list are not as keen, and it is a somewhat gruesome tale, but yeah, I got on with it really well. I'm from the UK where it's been out a long time.
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'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

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aessea1001
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about "The Wise Woman"

Post by aessea1001 » Sun November 9th, 2008, 11:27 pm

Thanks for welcoming me, EC2! Wasn't this one published in the UK in like 1992-I think I read that on the back of the book. Also: what is meant by the "uncharted sexual waters"? to tell you the truth I'm worried it's a threesome between Alys, Catherine and Hugo... :eek:

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Sun November 9th, 2008, 11:56 pm

[quote=""aessea1001""]Thanks for welcoming me, EC2! Wasn't this one published in the UK in like 1992-I think I read that on the back of the book. Also: what is meant by the "uncharted sexual waters"? to tell you the truth I'm worried it's a threesome between Alys, Catherine and Hugo... :eek: [/quote]

Golly, I don't remember those kind of specifics! :eek: All I have is a vague memory of enjoying the book. It was long ago in my goldfish memory. With Philippa Gregory though you never know. She quite likes her pervy stuff. :eek: :eek:
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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aessea1001
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Post by aessea1001 » Mon November 10th, 2008, 12:13 am

[quote=""EC2""]Golly, I don't remember those kind of specifics! :eek: All I have is a vague memory of enjoying the book. It was long ago in my goldfish memory. With Philippa Gregory though you never know. She quite likes her pervy stuff. :eek: :eek:[/quote]

uh-oh...now I'm a bit nervous to continue reading! lol... and speaking of Philippa Gregory's "pervy stuff" (I've never heard the word "pervy" before-I said it to myself and I chuckled :) ) I'm planning to never read her "Wideacre" Trilogy-incest, eww. :shudder: some things people just can't handle reading about, you know?
Last edited by aessea1001 on Mon November 10th, 2008, 12:21 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Vanessa
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Post by Vanessa » Mon November 10th, 2008, 8:32 am

I enjoyed The Wise Woman. I also enjoyed the Wideacre trilogy. I think PG's books are quite graphic. LOL. Having said that, I can't remember too much about them as it's some time since I read them.
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Divia
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Post by Divia » Mon November 10th, 2008, 11:22 am

I disliked it. I thought it was dull.
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Post by FlynnElk » Thu August 27th, 2009, 7:19 pm

I often find myself sitting shaking my head in disbelief with PG's books and The Wise Woman is no exception! It was so... grotesque is the first word that springs to mind! It seemed sexual just for the sake of it (did she have to mention something nude as an average every 5 pages to gain some sort of prize from her publisher?) and slightly worrying, if anything. Witchcraft and historical perceptions of it is a very interesting topic, but I don't think she handled even that aspect of the novel with anything like good taste.

I do remember reading a book around the same time called The Midwife's Apprentice (Young Adult fiction) as a teenager and thinking that gave a far better view on natural medicine of the past. I've not seen the book for years, though, so could be completely wrong!
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cw gortner
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Post by cw gortner » Thu August 27th, 2009, 11:06 pm

I remember finding Wise Woman particularly distasteful, and I consider myself pretty resiliant when it comes to sex and violence in novels. If it furthers the story, I'm fine, but in Wise Woman it seemed to be The Story, and only further emphasized how despicable every character was; I ended up not caring who survived.

I admire PG's skill, tenacity and success, but, for me, her claim to be revisionist and feminist doesn't show, not when she portrays openly ambitious and sexual women, like Anne Boleyn, as amoral, or as in the case of Elizabeth Woodville, as a witch. This is not revisionist, in my opinion: it's tried-and-true stereotype. Women as sluts, as witches, as scheming temptresses. Honestly, what's new there?

Guess this means I'm skipping White Queen, huh?
Last edited by cw gortner on Thu August 27th, 2009, 11:10 pm, edited 2 times in total.
THE QUEEN'S VOW available on June 12, 2012!
THE TUDOR SECRET, Book I in the Elizabeth I Spymaster Chronicles
THE CONFESSIONS OF CATHERINE DE MEDICI
THE LAST QUEEN


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Divia
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Post by Divia » Fri August 28th, 2009, 12:03 am

[quote=""cw gortner""]I admire PG's skill, tenacity and success, but, for me, her claim to be revisionist and feminist doesn't show, not when she portrays openly ambitious and sexual women, like Anne Boleyn, as amoral, or as in the case of Elizabeth Woodville, as a witch. This is not revisionist, in my opinion: it's tried-and-true stereotype. Women as sluts, as witches, as scheming temptresses. Honestly, what's new there?

Guess this means I'm skipping White Queen, huh?[/quote]

You are spot on. I couldn't agree with you more. You can't claim such a thing and then continue the stereotype that men have given women throughout most of history.
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