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The Gargoyle by Andrew Davidson

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diamondlil
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The Gargoyle by Andrew Davidson

Post by diamondlil » Thu November 6th, 2008, 2:14 am

An extraordinary debut novel of love that survives the fires of hell and transcends the boundaries of time

The narrator of The Gargoyle is a very contemporary cynic, physically beautiful and sexually adept, who dwells in the moral vacuum that is modern life. As the book opens, he is driving along a dark road when he is distracted by what seems to be a flight of arrows. He crashes into a ravine and suffers horrible burns over much of his body. As he recovers in a burn ward, undergoing the tortures of the damned, he awaits the day when he can leave the hospital and commit carefully planned suicide—for he is now a monster in appearance as well as in soul.

A beautiful and compelling, but clearly unhinged, sculptress of gargoyles by the name of Marianne Engel appears at the foot of his bed and insists that they were once lovers in medieval Germany. In her telling, he was a badly injured mercenary and she was a nun and scribe in the famed monastery of Engelthal who nursed him back to health. As she spins their tale in Scheherazade fashion and relates equally mesmerizing stories of deathless love in Japan, Iceland, Italy, and England, he finds himself drawn back to life—and, finally, in love. He is released into Marianne's care and takes up residence in her huge stone house. But all is not well. For one thing, the pull of his past sins becomes ever more powerful as the morphine he is prescribed becomes ever more addictive. For another, Marianne receives word from God that she has only twenty-seven sculptures left to complete—and her time on earth will be finished.

Already an international literary sensation, the Gargoyle is an Inferno for our time. It will have you believing in the impossible.

I don't actually tend to take much notice of holidays, and that is even more true when it is a holiday that we don't actually celebrate here. It was therefore a bit of a surprise to find myself reading not one but two books that are perfect Halloween reads. The first is a short story collection called Many Bloody Returns featuring vampires and birthdays stories from lots of different writers, and the other was this book.

From the very early pages, it is clear that our main character is one that most people would not want to befriend. Ironically enough, prior to his accident he was, physically at least, someone that would be considered very attractive - young, wealthy, attractive. After a terrible childhood, he drifts into a world filled with pornography and drugs, until he is driven as opposed to drifting in this world. After his accident, his is no longer physically attractive because of his terrible scarring, an irony that is not lost on him or anyone else.

This isn't a book for the faint of heart. The first few pages are nothing but graphic, as our main character, who remains nameless throughout the whole novel, has a terrible car crash.
We meet him a few seconds before as he drives along a cliff top road, influenced by drugs and alcohol. We ride in the car as it rolls down the hillside, as the flames engulfs, as he is rescued and taken to hospital and as he realises the full extent of his terrible injuries. I started reading this book on the train, and I was actually wincing at some of the parts, particularly where he talked about what happened to one of his feet.

And yet despite the gruesomeness of the descriptions, the writing is multi layered with moments of macabre comedy, beautiful tenderness, and incredible depth. The writing is not perfect - there are moments when tenses slip - but it is definitely compelling.

When our burns victim meets Marianne Engel, he is caught up in the whirlwind of energy that she brings with her, almost manic at times. He does not know her, but she is insistent that they have known each other for hundreds of years and she proceeds throughout the rest of the book to tell him their story. She also tells other stories, of ultimate love stories set in Iceland, Japan and England through the years. The story she tells is completely fantastical, and whilst there is some evidence to suggest that people are right to question Marianne's mental stability, our main character finds himself becoming less suicidal, less emotionally restricted and more open to new friendships around him due to her influence.

This book has so many layers - it is definitely a love story, there are fantasy elements, particularly in the latter stages of the book, it is a historical essay on the production of books in medieval abbeys, and a tribute to Dante's Inferno with side trips into mysticism and other historical detail. In lesser hands this could have become tangled and we could have been left with an unsatisfactory mess. Luckily for the reader, Davidson is skilled, and instead we end up with an infinitely readable, complicated and beautiful novel. A strong love story bound in fascinating detail.


Love is an action you must repeat ceaselessly.
This is a very assured debut novel. I can't wait to see what Andrew Davidson comes up with next.
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Vanessa
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Post by Vanessa » Thu November 6th, 2008, 8:24 am

I have this one on my TBR pile. I know quite a few people who have enjoyed it and a couple who haven't!
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

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Michelle2
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Post by Michelle2 » Fri November 7th, 2008, 12:23 am

In my tbr also!

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Margaret
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Post by Margaret » Fri November 7th, 2008, 6:29 pm

Good review, Lil. I felt the same way about this novel. It absolutely captivated me. My review is at http://www.HistoricalNovels.info/Gargoyle.html.
Browse over 5000 historical novel listings (probably well over 5000 by now, but I haven't re-counted lately) and over 700 reviews at www.HistoricalNovels.info

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Tinuviel
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Post by Tinuviel » Thu November 27th, 2008, 4:35 am

It's in my TBR too, one of my roommates read it and really liked it and told me I should read it. The storyline seems really interesting.

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Ludmilla
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Post by Ludmilla » Thu September 17th, 2009, 7:30 pm

[quote=""diamondlil""]
This isn't a book for the faint of heart. ...

And yet despite the gruesomeness of the descriptions, the writing is multi layered with moments of macabre comedy, beautiful tenderness, and incredible depth. The writing is not perfect - there are moments when tenses slip - but it is definitely compelling.

[/quote]


I just finished this and was totally enthralled by it. As you say, definitely not for the faint of heart, but I was completely riveted by the medical treatment the main character had to undergo, and I was half way through the novel before I realized he had never been given a name.

It is, ultimately, a very tender love story. The relationship reminded me a little bit of the film, Harold and Maude, in the way Marianne (whether she's eccentric or crazy) inspires this burn victim to begin to heal and appreciate life in a way he never had before. I also liked the way her stories, in Scheherazade-like fashion, intersect with their own story.

Does anyone know what Davidson is working on now?

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Leo62
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Post by Leo62 » Thu September 17th, 2009, 10:27 pm

I gave up on this after a few pages, but you've inspired me to give it another go. :D
listen:there's a hell
of a good universe next door;let's go
ee cummings

gyrehead
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Post by gyrehead » Fri September 18th, 2009, 3:03 am

I have to admit. This was a book that should not have worked for me. It was deliberately manipulative; oddly structured and had a strange pace.

And yet I too really really liked it and look forward to his next book.

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Carine
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Post by Carine » Fri September 18th, 2009, 6:21 am

I have it on my TBR shelf too and looking forward to reading it, certainly after Lil's review.

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Ludmilla
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Post by Ludmilla » Fri September 18th, 2009, 1:31 pm

[quote=""gyrehead""]I have to admit. This was a book that should not have worked for me. It was deliberately manipulative; oddly structured and had a strange pace.

And yet I too really really liked it and look forward to his next book.[/quote]

This does seem to be the sort of book people will either love or be turned off by--at the very least elicit an immediate, visceral reaction. I agree about it being manipulative to a certain extent, but given the narrator's background, I found it understandable, and I suppose was more forgiving than I might be with another novel with different types of characters and situations. I think the author performs a juggling act with his themes and imagery, and at any moment he could have dropped the balls, but, though he did have a few moments where I wasn't sure he could sustain it, he successfully (and quite beautifully) concludes his performance. A tour de force, really.

On the book's Amazon page, the author says about his next book:
I liked writing The Gargoyle, and I think I’ll write another novel. If I can, I’ll make up new characters and a new plot. That’s my plan.
I guess that's all we're going to know about what's next for awhile. :)

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