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Bizarre Names

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SonjaMarie
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Post by SonjaMarie » Wed November 5th, 2008, 5:12 am

Rep. Dave Upthegrove - http://www.leg.wa.gov/House/Upthegrove

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nona
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Post by nona » Thu November 27th, 2008, 6:00 pm

I talked to a gentleman the other day and his name was Viken Ashgrove, I loved the whole first name, and he said his family was from Norway.

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ejays17
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Post by ejays17 » Sat December 13th, 2008, 2:23 am

The younger sister of a girl I went to school with married a guy with the surname of "Scragg" and took his name. :confused:

I'm not sure if others are familiar with the slang meaning, which is roughly a "loose woman" or one who is excessively tarty (it's a bit hard to describe), but it doesn't have good connotations for a female :rolleyes:

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Telynor
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Post by Telynor » Sat December 13th, 2008, 11:30 am

[quote=""ejays17""]The younger sister of a girl I went to school with married a guy with the surname of "Scragg" and took his name. :confused:

I'm not sure if others are familiar with the slang meaning, which is roughly a "loose woman" or one who is excessively tarty (it's a bit hard to describe), but it doesn't have good connotations for a female :rolleyes: [/quote]

If you've ever been in the US military, scragg is also a verb -- as in 'to scragg' or 'scragging.' It's not a nice word, pretty meaning to take out a superior officer, usually during the Vietnam war, and mostly a very inexperienced lieutenant who didn't know how to lead mean.

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Sat December 13th, 2008, 4:46 pm

[quote=""Telynor""]If you've ever been in the US military, scragg is also a verb -- as in 'to scragg' or 'scragging.' It's not a nice word, pretty meaning to take out a superior officer, usually during the Vietnam war, and mostly a very inexperienced lieutenant who didn't know how to lead mean.[/quote]
When I was in the Coast guard, the term for shooting your superior in a firefight --where nobody knew where the bullet came from --was 'fragging'. But maybe different in other services?

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