Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Bizarre Names

User avatar
EC2
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3661
Joined: August 2008
Location: Nottingham UK
Contact:

Post by EC2 » Sat November 1st, 2008, 8:26 am

My dad used to work with a guy called Terry Bull. We also have an estate agent in the UK called Paul Orridge.
Why don't parents think?
A teacher friend stateside had a 'Temptress' in her class one year which just seems eeeeeuwww to me to be calling a little girl that - and equally eeeuwww when she's an old lady.
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

User avatar
Alaric
Avid Reader
Posts: 428
Joined: September 2008
Location: Adelaide, Australia.
Contact:

Post by Alaric » Sat November 1st, 2008, 8:28 am

[quote=""annis""]I once knew an infortunate young guy called Wayne Kerr. You can imagine the hard time he got at school :( [/quote]

Heh, one of the players in the Ireland rugby team has that name.

A lot of celebrities these days seem to be in a contest with each other to give their kids the most ridiculous embarrassing names. Penn, from Penn and Teller, named his daughter Moxie Crimefighter. Err, why would you do that to the kid? :rolleyes:

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4226
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Post by Vanessa » Sat November 1st, 2008, 9:26 am

We know someone called Bertie Bunny. I can't even say it without smiling.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
diamondlil
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 2642
Joined: August 2008

Post by diamondlil » Sat November 1st, 2008, 10:18 am

[quote=""Alaric""]Heh, one of the players in the Ireland rugby team has that name.

A lot of celebrities these days seem to be in a contest with each other to give their kids the most ridiculous embarrassing names. Penn, from Penn and Teller, named his daughter Moxie Crimefighter. Err, why would you do that to the kid? :rolleyes: [/quote]


That is terrible. Poor child.
My Blog - Reading Adventures

All things Historical Fiction - Historical Tapestry


There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

User avatar
donroc
Compulsive Reader
Posts: 858
Joined: August 2008
Location: Winter Haven, Florida
Contact:

Post by donroc » Sat November 1st, 2008, 11:57 am

I had a student when I taught high school whose first name was La Trina.
Another with the first name of Private.
Image

Bodo the Apostate, a novel set during the reign of Louis the Pious and end of the Carolingian Empire.

http://www.donaldmichaelplatt.com
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXZthhY6 ... annel_page

User avatar
Ludmilla
Bibliophile
Posts: 1346
Joined: September 2008
Location: Georgia USA

Post by Ludmilla » Sat November 1st, 2008, 1:51 pm

When my youngest was still in daycare, there was a girl in her class named Messiah. This year, there's a girl in her K class named Makita (not sure on spelling). Every time I hear that name, I think power tool. Funny, the things you associate with certain names and that would be considered over the top in some cultures but perfectly normal in others.

User avatar
donroc
Compulsive Reader
Posts: 858
Joined: August 2008
Location: Winter Haven, Florida
Contact:

Post by donroc » Sat November 1st, 2008, 3:47 pm

When I was in the fifth grade in San Francisco, a new boy checked into our class, and every time we heard his last name we giggled. It was so distressing to the boy that his mother had to come to class and explain that the name meant "Love Shot" in German. That ended the giggling.

Gerhard Lipschitz.

As an aside, mothers were great in those days. Another came to class when her son enrolled in the school to explain that he was slow and it would be nice of we all helped him. We did not have "Special Education" classes in the early 1940s.

And another mother visited the home of each 6th grade classmate of her son to explain his slowness, and how wonderful it would be if we all attended his 12th birthday party and made a fuss over him. And we all did.
Image

Bodo the Apostate, a novel set during the reign of Louis the Pious and end of the Carolingian Empire.

http://www.donaldmichaelplatt.com
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXZthhY6 ... annel_page

User avatar
Volgadon
Compulsive Reader
Posts: 654
Joined: September 2008
Location: Israel
Contact:

Post by Volgadon » Sun November 2nd, 2008, 8:18 am

[quote=""MLS859""]I was in the grocery store and the cashier had on a name tag -- it said "Moronica". I kid you not.

Lynn[/quote]

I think Moronica means dark girl.

User avatar
Melisende
Reader
Posts: 118
Joined: August 2008
Location: Australia

Post by Melisende » Sun November 2nd, 2008, 11:37 am

Nicole Kidman's new babe "Sunday Rose" - or as she is also known "sunday roast"
"For my part, I adhere to the maxim of antiquity: The throne is a glorious sepulchre."

Women of History

User avatar
Carine
Compulsive Reader
Posts: 675
Joined: September 2008
Currently reading: Jonkvrouw - Jean-Claude Van Ryckeghem
Interest in HF: I love history
Favourite HF book: Can't pin that down to only 1 :-)
Preferred HF: Medieval, Tudor and Ancient Egyptian
Location: Ghent, Belgium
Contact:

Post by Carine » Sun November 2nd, 2008, 12:31 pm

There is a doctor in town here called Dr. Coffin !
Good thing that he doens't live in an English speaking country !!

Post Reply

Return to “Chat”