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Clichés in writing

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Divia
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Clichés in writing

Post by Divia » Fri October 31st, 2008, 3:11 am

So I'm reading this book, which really sucks, but thats not the point. Anyway, I come to this passage where the owner of a horse, a gentlewoman has command over a powerful beast, which is so mighty that even the stablehand cannot control the animal.
:rolleyes:

And how many times have I read that in a book before. OMG its so sad that I have to keep reading the same ol' stuff again and again.

My rant is now done...

Anyone else have this issue?
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donroc
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Post by donroc » Fri October 31st, 2008, 3:40 am

The abduction of the MC's daughter, wife, or significant other by the villain. That is my main wall damager.

The deliberately flawed attorney/PI (alcohol, drugs) who comes through in the end.

The heir deprived of his inheritance by the vicious uncle and suffers for 400 pages, then get his revenge after the uncle has lived the good life and doesn't give a damn anymore.
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Bodo the Apostate, a novel set during the reign of Louis the Pious and end of the Carolingian Empire.

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Post by boswellbaxter » Fri October 31st, 2008, 3:58 am

The medieval heroine who refuses to be "sold into marriage," as she always puts it, and who is determined to marry for love.
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Post by Carine » Fri October 31st, 2008, 6:48 am

I had enough of the heroine who is forced into marrying her biggest enemie and then falls in love with him head over heels.
That's how I hardly ever read historical romance anymore. When I read the backcover of the book and see something like that I just put it back right away !

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Post by diamondlil » Fri October 31st, 2008, 8:56 am

I totally hear what you are saying. For me though, one of the marks of a really strong writer is that they can write a cliched story and it can be fresh and not boring despite the fact that you have read it before.
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Post by Volgadon » Fri October 31st, 2008, 9:02 am

The girl who runs away to be a soldier!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Fri October 31st, 2008, 9:55 am

I suppose that many of the cliches are archetypal plot stories that we might moan about sometimes, but which are part of our basic psyche. It's the hero's journey and all that. Bad boy makes good. Poor man becomes rich. Poor plain girl gets wealthy man, or heroine is the only one who can tame the bad boy - who then makes good. Character overcomes adversity of some kind or another. Wicked person gets their come-uppance. They're all cliches and they are all our tales from back round the campfire days. We need them. It's the comfort of familiarity. As a species we love our repetition.
As Diamond says, it's all in the execution and in finding new ways to tell these tales.
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Divia
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Post by Divia » Fri October 31st, 2008, 11:14 am

I hear ya EC but sometimes ya can put a little twist on that...and sometimes authors dont seem to be doing it.
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Post by EC2 » Fri October 31st, 2008, 2:46 pm

[quote=""Divia""]I hear ya EC but sometimes ya can put a little twist on that...and sometimes authors dont seem to be doing it.[/quote]

I do know what you mean Divia! It's up to an author to be skilful enough to make the work fresh and exciting, and sometimes material does seem very same-old, same-old.
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For never will cowards fall down there.'

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Post by Margaret » Fri October 31st, 2008, 9:47 pm

I'm with Bos on this one. The girl of a past century who rebels against an unwanted marriage is not necessarily a bad plot line, but it's a stretch, and it's been done to death. The times being what they were, I'll bet there were a fair number of aristocratic girls who were as eager as their parents were to land someone with a huge estate and piles of gold. And if they didn't want to marry the guy their parents selected for them, they really didn't have a lot of options.
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