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Antidepressants and the craft.

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Barbara Passaris
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Antidepressants and the craft.

Post by Barbara Passaris » Sun October 26th, 2008, 8:46 pm

For anyone who is brave enough to answer this in a public thread and forum, I thank you. If you don't want to go public, please pop me a personal message. I'd love to have some advice on this one.

Is anyone out there able to "work" at writing when they are on antidepressant medications?

I don't want to go into it, but I am toying with the idea of medications, but I am so afraid of "killing" my creativity. Any suggestions or input would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks so much.

Barb Passaris

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Volgadon
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Post by Volgadon » Sun October 26th, 2008, 10:04 pm

Never had medication for it, but when I get depressed I don't want to do anything, period.

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Post by donroc » Sun October 26th, 2008, 10:42 pm

One thing I learned about anti-depressants (tho' I do not take them) when I was a with for a physician who wanted to write a book on sexual dysfunction: If you must take them, find a medication that does not destory your libido. We did not cover writing.
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Post by Grasshopper » Sun October 26th, 2008, 11:35 pm

Interesting topic. Although I'm not a writer, I am a pharmacist and have occasionally had to take AD's.

My thought is that if an anti-depressant is being taken and is working (patient approaching normality with mood, socializing, etc.), then I would think that it would free the patient/writer to do his/her work. Depression is a wet blanket, causing the patient to not want to do work, hobbies, or pleasure. I don't believe it to be "cheating" but if given correctly, AD's can be a miracle drug. If it is not working, all you are gonna get is side effects. Interesting thought about taking an AD to research sexual dysfunction....whoa...

If the patient has some level of thought scattering and is taking non-AD meds for that...that would be a different story. Suppression of dopamine receptor (meds for psychosis or true bipolar mania) would suppress thoughts and therefore keep a writer from the flow of ideas.

Just my opinion...

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Post by Barbara Passaris » Mon October 27th, 2008, 12:36 am

Okay, thanks...I'm talking about situational depression. Thanks for the info and the insight. It's much appreciated.

Barb Passaris

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Mon October 27th, 2008, 1:29 am

When I'm in one of my "moods" as I call them then no I dont want to do anything. I lay about the house pondering things. Though my "dark days" have given me great insight into the world and has given me a lot of fuel.

Its a double edged sword in my opinion. I have never taken anything for them because I can still function
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Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Mon October 27th, 2008, 2:09 am

Re the question on antidepressants and libido, I am reminded of an article I read recently. It seems that the class of drugs known as 'serotonin re-uptake inhibitors' (prozac, zoloft and the like) suppress the body's ability to manufacture vasopressin and oxytocin, both known for helping in mate bonding and parent-child bonding. Sometimes they are called the 'romance hormones'.
What that has to do with writing is questionable. Maybe the romantic elements of your plot would be more wooden. Anyway, if you try it and find out one way or the other, let us know!
I can't help but think of the number of great writers who suffered from depression. Hemmingway, Poe, Faulkner, and Sylvia Plath come to mind. If Camus wasn't depressed, he sure depressed me!

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Post by Divia » Mon October 27th, 2008, 2:21 am

[quote=""MLE""] If Camus wasn't depressed, he sure depressed me![/quote]


:D

Yeah, I dunno what it is with depression and the arts. If someone would tell me I'd love to know. Even a lot of the great artists were depressed all the time. Whats up with that?
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Post by Barbara Passaris » Mon October 27th, 2008, 2:21 am

[quote=""Divia""]When I'm in one of my "moods" as I call them then no I dont want to do anything. I lay about the house pondering things. Though my "dark days" have given me great insight into the world and has given me a lot of fuel.

Its a double edged sword in my opinion. I have never taken anything for them because I can still function[/quote]

I'm still functioning...I mean that I can go to my job (very difficult teaching post--nevermind....In this economy, no job should be sneezed at.) BUt writing is difficult. It's hard for me to focus and be creative. I have lots going on in my head, but sitting down to actually write? Well, for some reason there's almost a fear about it. I have a really promising piece that I'm almost finished with. But sitting down to it is not always easy. Part of the reason for that is that some of it is very personal for me. You know that writers put so much of themselves into their work. I've been pondering so much lately, and there are so many things going on with us in our family, mostly having to do with extended family and aging parents.

Anyway, I was just wondering about the meds....As far as the sexual dysfunction thing--don't want to go there!!! Enough said about that part of the topic for me.... :p Though I do think that the scientific end of it is very interesting. The brain and how it works always fascinates me. ( I guess the other end does, too, to be honest. Okay, I'll behave myself!!!!)

~Barb
Last edited by Barbara Passaris on Mon October 27th, 2008, 2:24 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Volgadon » Mon October 27th, 2008, 1:13 pm

[quote=""MLE""]Re the question on antidepressants and libido, I am reminded of an article I read recently. It seems that the class of drugs known as 'serotonin re-uptake inhibitors' (prozac, zoloft and the like) suppress the body's ability to manufacture vasopressin and oxytocin, both known for helping in mate bonding and parent-child bonding. Sometimes they are called the 'romance hormones'.
What that has to do with writing is questionable. Maybe the romantic elements of your plot would be more wooden. Anyway, if you try it and find out one way or the other, let us know!
I can't help but think of the number of great writers who suffered from depression. Hemmingway, Poe, Faulkner, and Sylvia Plath come to mind. If Camus wasn't depressed, he sure depressed me![/quote]

Or maybe the romantic elements will be better, because they are less based in reality, if I'm making any sense.

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