Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Who are your favorite romance authors??

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Wed August 27th, 2008, 6:18 am

Penelope Williamson's "Keeper of the Dream" is an old favorite, also Amanda Quick's historical romances, like "Scandal" and "Mystique"; sexy and fun. Unfortunately over the years her novels have become fairly perfunctory, with little character development and no sign of her earlier sparkling repartee.

In recent times I've been quite taken with Helen Kirkman's novels set in Dark Age England- good stuff!

User avatar
CarolASpradling
Newbie
Location: Ormond Beach, FL

Question

Postby CarolASpradling » Wed August 27th, 2008, 10:23 am

It is great to see such a varied list. I'm curious. What is it about these authors that make them a favorite?

Carol

User avatar
diamondlil
Bibliomaniac

Postby diamondlil » Wed August 27th, 2008, 10:47 am

For me it the ability to be drawn into the story, but it is also a lot about the consistently good quality of the writing from book to book!

User avatar
EC2
Bibliomaniac
Location: Nottingham UK
Contact:

Postby EC2 » Wed August 27th, 2008, 11:08 am

"Leyland" wrote:One of my favorite romance authors who has been published since the 60's is Jane Aiken Hodge. My top picks are The Winding Stair, Watch the Wall My Darling, Greek Wedding, The Adventurers, Wide is the Water, Marry in Haste, and Escapade.



Leyland, Jane Aiken Hodge was one of the first 'adult' historical authors I bought and Watch the Wall My Darling was the first book. I still have it somewhere among my keepers in the loft I think. I actually prefer her to Georgette Heyer -she's much less twittery to my reader's ear.

Misfit - sorry about messing up your TBR - Not! :p :p :p :D
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

User avatar
Leyland
Bibliophile
Location: Travelers Rest SC

Postby Leyland » Wed August 27th, 2008, 11:54 am

"EC2" wrote:Leyland, Jane Aiken Hodge was one of the first 'adult' historical authors I bought and Watch the Wall My Darling was the first book. I still have it somewhere among my keepers in the loft I think.


There are a handful of 70's paperbacks that are forever keepers (the kind you'd race back into your burning house to rescue) and Watch the Wall is definitely one for me! My Mary Stewart collection would be worth risking fire for as well. I love the hero in Watch the Wall the way I love Red Adam and also Nick Sabine in Brent's Moonraker's Bride. I just love all those 70's romantic suspense novels.

On the Night of the Seventh Moon by Victoria Holt is another. OK, I'll stop now!
We are the music makers, And we are the dreamers of dreams ~ Arthur O'Shaughnessy, Ode

User avatar
Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Wed August 27th, 2008, 1:42 pm

"diamondlil" wrote:For me it the ability to be drawn into the story, but it is also a lot about the consistently good quality of the writing from book to book!



Ditto. I do like to luxuriate in a romance but if the writing and story stinks it's just not worth it.

User avatar
LCW
Compulsive Reader
Location: Southern California

Postby LCW » Wed August 27th, 2008, 3:46 pm

"annis" wrote:Penelope Williamson's "Keeper of the Dream" is an old favorite


I thought it was a good book but I couldn't stand the hero. He was just too mean. The rest of it was great, esp. his magical (??) squire. He needs his own book!!
Books to the ceiling,
Books to the sky,
My pile of books is a mile high.
How I love them! How I need them!
I'll have a long beard by the time I read them. --Arnold Lobel

User avatar
Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Location: Seattle, WA

Postby Misfit » Wed August 27th, 2008, 3:55 pm

"1lila1" wrote:I thought it was a good book but I couldn't stand the hero. He was just too mean. The rest of it was great, esp. his magical (??) squire. He needs his own book!!



I agree, the squire was the character who really elevated the book for me. It got an extra star just for him.

User avatar
LCW
Compulsive Reader
Location: Southern California

Postby LCW » Wed August 27th, 2008, 4:03 pm

I agree. And the epilogue with the squire in the future was my favorite part of the whole book!
Books to the ceiling,

Books to the sky,

My pile of books is a mile high.

How I love them! How I need them!

I'll have a long beard by the time I read them. --Arnold Lobel

annis
Bibliomaniac

Postby annis » Wed August 27th, 2008, 6:13 pm

I really enjoyed Penelope Williamson's Old West novel "The Outsider" too - the unlikely romance between a gunslinger and a woman of the Plain religion. It did work, though, and there were a lot of well drawn secondary characters like the people in the Plain community, and also the conflict between the sheep farmers and the cattle ranchers added interest and tension. I've never found a copy of her "Heart of the West", but I know a lot of people loved that one as well.

I guess that the hero of "Keeper of the Dream" was a hard man because he'd had such a hard and lonely childhood, and we did see him grow in emotional warmth as the story went on.

I'd sort of forgotten about Cathy Cash Spellman until EC mentioned her, but yes, "Paint the Wind" was very good, and I also remember a family saga she wrote which started and ended in Ireland, but was set largely in America. The period was late C19th and early C20th -"So Many Partings" was the title.


Return to “Historical Romance”