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What Are You Reading? July 2013

For discussions of historical fiction. Threads that do not relate to historical fiction should be started in the Chat forum or elsewhere on the forum, depending on the topic.
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emr
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Post by emr » Thu July 11th, 2013, 12:26 am

[quote=""Misfit""]Sounds like a scene from The White Queen on Starz :p [/quote]

I was thinking Peter Greenway :D
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JenniferLovesRoxi
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Post by JenniferLovesRoxi » Thu July 11th, 2013, 3:30 am

I am about halfway through reading Ingeld's Daughter by Carla Nayland. I saw a thread on here a week or so ago talking about her Paths of Exile that sounds wonderful (I am currently on a major Dark Ages Britain reading run) and went to Carla's website/blog and she has got her earlier book Ingeld's Daughter available to download for free.

So I am reading that while I work on saving up points on Bing to get my next free Amazon giftcard, which I will be using to purchase Paths of Exile.

annis
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Post by annis » Thu July 11th, 2013, 5:27 am

Posted by emr
I was thinking Peter Greenway
Ohhh - love Greenaway. Hard to beat for sumptuous over-the-top-ness. The Draughtsman's Contract is one of my all-time favourite movies.

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sweetpotatoboy
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Post by sweetpotatoboy » Thu July 11th, 2013, 7:03 pm

Reading Jack Holmes and His Friend by Edmund White. I'm not reading as a historical novel but it is set in 1960s New York.

I was a bit thrown by the casual mention of a lead character's contact lens, this being the early 60s. The implication is that contacts were so common that it was not a remarkable thing. I wasn't aware that they were in mass use at that stage, even in the US. My first memory of someone with contact lenses here in the UK was probably in about 1979 and they were very rare.

I tried to read up about the history of contact lenses a bit. Were they in mass use in the early 60s in the US? From what I've read, they were very expensive at that stage and therefore not widespread. However, the author would have been around then so should know.

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Thu July 11th, 2013, 7:14 pm

Well, I got my pair in '69, and they weren't that unusual, and we were just middle-class. Hard little chips of plastic that floated around on you eyeball, you could only wear them for 10 hours or so and then they had to come out. Most of our high school athletes would get them because glasses and football don't go together.

And I do remember during my high school years ('66-'70) when somebody got knocked out in sports, the first thing you were supposed to do was check to make sure they weren't wearing contacts, because in those days of impermeable lenses, they would cut off tears/oxygen to the eye if the person was not blinking, causing permanent damage to the cornea.

Good heavens, I wonder now that anybody wore them at all! (But I confess to a teenager's vanity. Glasses were not cool.)

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sweetpotatoboy
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Post by sweetpotatoboy » Thu July 11th, 2013, 7:17 pm

[quote=""MLE""]Well, I got my pair in '69, and they weren't that unusual, and we were just middle-class. Hard little chips of plastic that floated around on you eyeball, you could only wear them for 10 hours or so and then they had to come out. Most of our high school athletes would get them because glasses and football don't go together.

And I do remember during my high school years ('66-'70) when somebody got knocked out in sports, the first thing you were supposed to do was check to make sure they weren't wearing contacts, because in those days of impermeable lenses, they would cut off tears/oxygen to the eye if the person was not blinking, causing permanent damage to the cornea.

Good heavens, I wonder now that anybody wore them at all! (But I confess to a teenager's vanity. Glasses were not cool.)[/quote]

OK, thanks for that! Interesting. I guess the UK took quite a long time to catch on. I had hard lenses from about 1987 till quite some time into the 90s when soft lenses became widely available.

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Fri July 12th, 2013, 12:02 am

[quote=""MLE""]Well, I got my pair in '69, and they weren't that unusual, and we were just middle-class. Hard little chips of plastic that floated around on you eyeball, you could only wear them for 10 hours or so and then they had to come out. Most of our high school athletes would get them because glasses and football don't go together.

And I do remember during my high school years ('66-'70) when somebody got knocked out in sports, the first thing you were supposed to do was check to make sure they weren't wearing contacts, because in those days of impermeable lenses, they would cut off tears/oxygen to the eye if the person was not blinking, causing permanent damage to the cornea.

Good heavens, I wonder now that anybody wore them at all! (But I confess to a teenager's vanity. Glasses were not cool.)[/quote]

I think I started wearing them in the late 70s and they were quite common and easy to obtain.
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Ash
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Post by Ash » Fri July 12th, 2013, 12:10 am

I got mine in the mid 70s and they were very common by that time. I don't remember hearing about them much before 1970, but I'd do suspect they were in the development stages for a long time prior.

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Post by annis » Fri July 12th, 2013, 3:05 am

I first got contacts about 1970 here in New Zealand and they were already common then. Reasonably expensive, but I hated my glasses (which I'd wore since I was about 10) with a dire hatred, and the contacts were my first major splurge when I started work. I seem to remember that the optician had a scheme whereby you could pay them off.

Unfortunately for those of us with astigmatism those little hard ones which cover the iris are still the only viable option, though at least the lenses are permeable these days. As I hit menopause and everything dried out (as it does including the lubrication in your eyes), I had to give them away and return to the glasses - now multi-focal. Luckily all vanity has dropped by the wayside in favour of comfort :)
Last edited by annis on Fri July 12th, 2013, 3:08 am, edited 1 time in total.

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sweetpotatoboy
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Post by sweetpotatoboy » Fri July 12th, 2013, 4:58 am

[quote=""annis""]I first got contacts about 1970 here in New Zealand and they were already common then. Reasonably expensive, but I hated my glasses (which I'd wore since I was about 10) with a dire hatred, and the contacts were my first major splurge when I started work. I seem to remember that the optician had a scheme whereby you could pay them off.

Unfortunately for those of us with astigmatism those little hard ones which cover the iris are still the only viable option, though at least the lenses are permeable these days. As I hit menopause and everything dried out (as it does including the lubrication in your eyes), I had to give them away and return to the glasses - now multi-focal. Luckily all vanity has dropped by the wayside in favour of comfort :) [/quote]

Gosh, it seems contacts appeared earlier everywhere than the UK! Does anyone in the UK remember them being current any earlier than my memory of about 1979?

I have astigmatisms and I've had soft lenses for years....

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