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Ariadne
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Post by Ariadne » Sat October 11th, 2008, 12:26 am

Hmm - what about Sarah Dunant's In the Company of the Courtesan? Wish I could find my copy to check...

Alison Weir's Innocent Traitor is multiple POV first-person present.

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Sat October 11th, 2008, 12:38 am

[quote=""Ariadne""]Hmm - what about Sarah Dunant's In the Company of the Courtesan? Wish I could find my copy to check...

Alison Weir's Innocent Traitor is multiple POV first-person present.[/quote]


I'm pretty sure Courtesan was first person, and I know Zemindar by Valerie Fitzgerald is (although I guess since it's not so new it doesn't count in some books).

I'll have to go through my read list to see if there's others but I really have to get back to Devils Brood right now :p

quick edit:

Outlander
Mary Stewarts Merlin Trilogy
Margaret George's Henry VIII book -- wasn't that first person?
Last edited by Misfit on Sat October 11th, 2008, 12:41 am, edited 1 time in total.

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LCW
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Post by LCW » Sat October 11th, 2008, 12:56 am

[/quote]The question of Anne's incest is powerfully suggested by the historical record, she was found guilty of incest and adultery. Perhaps we think now that this was a show trial but people at the time were convinced of her guilt, and the novel is written from the point of view of her sister, who would probably have shared the general fear.[/quote]

What's up with this woman's obsession with incest? I find that very unsettling and it makes me stay away from any more of her novels!
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boswellbaxter
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Post by boswellbaxter » Sat October 11th, 2008, 1:08 am

I don't how common 1st person present was in historical fiction before Gregory, but she writes, "The literary technique I have pioneered of writing in the first person present tense gives a tremendous immediacy," which makes it sound as if she gives herself credit for pioneering the technique in any type of literature, not just historical fiction. :eek: That's a bit much for me, although I have enjoyed some of her novels.
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Ariadne
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Post by Ariadne » Sat October 11th, 2008, 1:37 am

[quote=""boswellbaxter""]I don't how common 1st person present was in historical fiction before Gregory, but she writes, "The literary technique I have pioneered of writing in the first person present tense gives a tremendous immediacy," which makes it sound as if she gives herself credit for pioneering the technique in any time of literature, not just historical fiction. :eek: That's a bit much for me, although I have enjoyed some of her novels.[/quote]

Yes, it's pretty clear that's an exaggeration. I suspect it's fairly common in literary fiction. Come to think of it, Audrey Niffenegger's The Time-Traveler's Wife is another good and very well-known example from a few years back.

Like we were talking about on another thread, very few things are truly groundbreaking anymore, although I did like her use of that technique in Boleyn Inheritance.

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Sat October 11th, 2008, 1:55 am

Like we were talking about on another thread, very few things are truly groundbreaking anymore, although I did like her use of that technique in Boleyn Inheritance.
It worked there and it worked for Weir but it's getting very very old now. From what I gather she used it in TOQ and the reviews are "underwhelming" (I'm quoting another member here).

What's up with this woman's obsession with incest? I find that very unsettling and it makes me stay away from any more of her novels!
Agreed. I passed on the Wideacre books because of that, and she left a very bad taste with her comments for Seton's Devil Water and I'm glad she hasn't commented (or been allowed to comment -who knows which - on any other of Seton's novels).

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Sat October 11th, 2008, 2:05 am

[quote=""Ariadne""]Her bio says she has a BA in history and a PhD in 18th-century literature.[/quote]
Gregory trained as a journalist, working for the BBC and other media outlets before turning to full-time novel writing.
**scratches head again***

I'm not educated enough to know what goes into a BA in history but I have to put a couple of two cents in on that one. After Oprah put her name on Follett's Pillars of the Earth someone came rolling in to the Oprah book discussions pooh-pooing anyone who dared to say it was historically inaccurate and she had the history degree -- albeit her "degree" (or whatever her aclaim to history fame was) -- was in WWII and no where near any expertise in medieval history.

Now here's a kicker on The Constant Princess (did Arthur and Katherine really do it??) take,
Conventional history books rather underplay the relationship between Katherine and Arthur because they like to believe Katherine's later denial that the marriage was consummated. But the historical record at the time makes it clear that they had a full physical marriage and since they were very young, and isolated in Ludlow Castle I think it very likely that they would have become close or even fallen in love. On a visit to Ludlow Castle I found a drawing which an architect had made when they renovated the royal bedroom, they found a little carving of two hearts and a royal crown: the sweetest thing, on the panelling near to the floor. It was destroyed but we have a drawing. I think it possible that Arthur carved it for Katherine.
I think it possible??????

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Post by boswellbaxter » Sat October 11th, 2008, 2:28 am

I was taken aback at this line:

But the historical record at the time makes it clear that they had a full physical marriage
My understanding is that this was very much in dispute, then and now.
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Ariadne
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Post by Ariadne » Sat October 11th, 2008, 2:48 am

[quote=""Misfit""]It worked there and it worked for Weir but it's getting very very old now. From what I gather she used it in TOQ and the reviews are "underwhelming" (I'm quoting another member here).[/quote]

I agree - even though it's not common, that style calls a lot of attention to itself, so it gets old fast. It is in TOQ also, and it contributed to the slow pacing because there isn't as much action as in TBI... which means you get to listen to the characters' inner thoughts as they occur to them, repeatedly.

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Post by Divia » Sat October 11th, 2008, 3:29 am

[quote=""1lila1""][/quote]What's up with this woman's obsession with incest? I find that very unsettling and it makes me stay away from any more of her novels![/QUOTE]
On the other MB I said she had too much of a facination with it in my opinion. Its almost as if she enjoys it. Maybe she has some sick twisted thoughts.


[quote=""boswellbaxter""]I don't how common 1st person present was in historical fiction before Gregory, but she writes, "The literary technique I have pioneered of writing in the first person present tense gives a tremendous immediacy," which makes it sound as if she gives herself credit for pioneering the technique in any type of literature, not just historical fiction. :eek: That's a bit much for me, although I have enjoyed some of her novels.[/quote]

Ya know. Maybe its just me but Ms. Gregory sure does like to pat herself on the back and toot her own horn. I've read a few interviews where her ego seems bigger than the room. I'm starting to get displeased and she is quickly turning me off to her work.

Also Falling Angels used multipe points of view, first person and that was written before BI, though someone may want to check about TOBG.

[quote=""Misfit""]**scratches head again***

I'm not educated enough to know what goes into a BA in history but I have to put a couple of two cents in on that one.
Now here's a kicker on The Constant Princess (did Arthur and Katherine really do it??) I think it possible??????[/quote]

I have a BA in history. I've forgotten how many credits it was. I could look but I'm too lazy. Most of my classes were American History. Early American, slavery, and women. The thing with historians is you cannot debate that joan of arc died in 1431 however you can argue what motivated her. There are some aspects of history that are up to debate because people interpert them differently. Each historian has their own slant on the events.

Here's the thing about Arthur and Katherine....who knows? I don't think it can be proven or disproven. Much like Anne's incest with her brother. If your king is saying yes it happened then are you gonna say "no it didn't." everyone will nod their heads and say "See I told you so! Yes that makes so much sense! I knew it all along!" If the thing to do at the time was hate Anne then you hated Anne. I think she is simplfying things far too much when she says "well everyone agreed so it must be so."
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