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What Are You Reading? November 2012

For discussions of historical fiction. Threads that do not relate to historical fiction should be started in the Chat forum or elsewhere on the forum, depending on the topic.
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Brenna
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Post by Brenna » Thu November 8th, 2012, 4:08 pm

[quote=""Tanzanite""]Voice of the Falconer by David Blixt (follow up to The Master of Verona). Really liking it so far.[/quote]

I really enjoyed that one too! I haven't read the third one in the series yet but it's on my list.

I'm currently reading Jack Whyte's The Lance Thrower, the second to last book in his King Arthur series.
Brenna

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Berengaria
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Post by Berengaria » Fri November 9th, 2012, 2:12 am

[quote=""Susan""]I am enjoying it also. I've been getting some extra reading done because I still don't have school due to Hurricane Sandy. Too many people (and schools) do not have power where I teach. We will have to make up all the days lost.[/quote]
I have read the book twice...have her latest downloaded and awaiting my perusal. My best wishes go out to you; I hope you are soon back in school with your students! (I'm a fellow teacher)

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boswellbaxter
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Post by boswellbaxter » Fri November 9th, 2012, 4:03 am

I'm reading God Save the King by Laura Purcell. It's a novel about Queen Charlotte (George III's wife) and her daughters, and the effect the king's madness has on them. I'm enjoying it; the scenes where the king loses his mind are very emotionally intense.
Susan Higginbotham
Coming in October: The Woodvilles


http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/
http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/blog/

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Brenna
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Post by Brenna » Fri November 9th, 2012, 2:57 pm

[quote=""boswellbaxter""]I'm reading God Save the King by Laura Purcell. It's a novel about Queen Charlotte (George III's wife) and her daughters, and the effect the king's madness has on them. I'm enjoying it; the scenes where the king loses his mind are very emotionally intense.[/quote]

I just added that to my TBR wishlist. I'll be interested in your final thoughts!
Brenna

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princess garnet
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Post by princess garnet » Fri November 9th, 2012, 7:37 pm

Lost Memoirs of Jane Austen by Syrie James
The Pope's Jews by Gordon Thomas (NF)

J.D. Oswald
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Post by J.D. Oswald » Sat November 10th, 2012, 5:43 pm

As Remembrance Sunday approaches, I've been re-reading The Great Silence by Juliet Nicolson and researching the terrible facial wounds that many soldiers in World War I suffered. Some relied upon painted copper masks to cover their injuries. However, 'the masks were as alive as the effigies on tombs in churches up and down the country.' [p 67]
Thousands of men were prepared to put up with sometimes excruciating pain to get a new face. The pioneering surgeon Harold Gillies established a special hospital near Sidcup in Kent, specialising in the treatment of facial wounds using new fangled plastic surgery techniques. Results were often remarkable. [http://www.gilliesarchives.org.uk/index.htm]

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Amanda
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Post by Amanda » Sat November 10th, 2012, 11:18 pm

[quote=""J.D. Oswald""]As Remembrance Sunday approaches, I've been re-reading The Great Silence by Juliet Nicolson and researching the terrible facial wounds that many soldiers in World War I suffered. Some relied upon painted copper masks to cover their injuries. However, 'the masks were as alive as the effigies on tombs in churches up and down the country.' [p 67]
Thousands of men were prepared to put up with sometimes excruciating pain to get a new face. The pioneering surgeon Harold Gillies established a special hospital near Sidcup in Kent, specialising in the treatment of facial wounds using new fangled plastic surgery techniques. Results were often remarkable. [http://www.gilliesarchives.org.uk/index.htm][/quote]

I have seen the work of Gillies on a couple of doco's. Utterly fascinating, and remarkable work. Many great leaps forward in medicine have come about at times of war.
Have marked that book on the wishlist now.
Thanks for the recommendation.

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Brenna
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Post by Brenna » Sun November 11th, 2012, 6:28 pm

In addition to Jack Whyte's The Lance Thrower, I've also started reading Manda Scott's Dreaming the Bull (the second in her Boudica series).
Brenna

Ash
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Post by Ash » Mon November 12th, 2012, 2:07 am

Reading The Illuminations, a novel about Hildegard of Bergen. Very very good - also listening to the CD Feather on the Breath of God, which is a collection of her music.

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sweetpotatoboy
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Post by sweetpotatoboy » Mon November 12th, 2012, 10:01 am

I've just started A Time To Die by Wilbur Smith.

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