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Cromarty fisherfolk dialect's last native speaker dies

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Rowan
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Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
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Cromarty fisherfolk dialect's last native speaker dies

Post by Rowan » Wed October 3rd, 2012, 1:17 pm

Not exactly "history" per se, but isn't history really made up of many parts, including speech? *shrugs* Just my opinion.
Retired engineer Bobby Hogg, 92, was the last person who was still fluent in the dialect used in parts of the Black Isle, near Inverness.

His younger brother Gordon was also a native speaker. He died in April last year aged 86.

The dialect is believed to have arrived in the area with fishing families that moved north from the Firth of Forth in 15th and 16th centuries.
You can listen to Bobby and his brother speaking this dialect on the story's page.

princess
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Location: Scotland

Post by princess » Thu October 18th, 2012, 9:41 pm

[quote=""Rowan""]Not exactly "history" per se, but isn't history really made up of many parts, including speech? *shrugs* Just my opinion.[/quote]

Very true and now sadly it looks as though this dialect will be consigned to history. I have to confess that I live in the same part of the country as Cromarty but have never heard/heard of this dialect until recently :o
Currently reading: The Poisoned Pilgrim: A Hangman's Daughter Tale by Oliver Potzsch

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