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King Richard III's grave may be under parking lot

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Susan
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Post by Susan » Tue February 5th, 2013, 2:00 am

I posted a short article at Unofficial Royalty with some resource links including two from the University of Leicester that are quite interesting.
http://www.unofficialroyalty.com/remain ... chard-iii/
~Susan~
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rebecca
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Post by rebecca » Tue February 5th, 2013, 2:14 am

I found the facial reconstruction fascinating and so close to the portrait too!

Bec :)

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Susan
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Post by Susan » Tue February 5th, 2013, 2:28 am

[quote=""annis""]Fascinating - thanks, Misfit. It certainly resembles the portraits of him, doesn't it? He was a rather good-looking guy if this reconstruction is anything to go by.[/quote]

It's quite interesting that the facial reconstruction does resemble the portraits which were not contemporary portraits.

This one is dated c. 1520 and there was a lost original (no date)
Image

This one is from the late 16th century and many copies were made.
Image
~Susan~
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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Tue February 5th, 2013, 2:34 am

[quote=""rebecca""]I found the facial reconstruction fascinating and so close to the portrait too!

Bec :) [/quote]

There is a strong similarity between the two, isn't there?
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annis
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Post by annis » Tue February 5th, 2013, 6:52 am

Just had to share this one :)


Image

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Nefret
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Post by Nefret » Tue February 5th, 2013, 9:21 am

Hilarious! Except Baldrick was more cunning in that series.
Into battle we ride with Gods by our side
We are strong and not afraid to die
We have an urge to kill and our lust for blood has to be fulfilled
WE´LL FIGHT TILL THE END! And send our enemies straight to Hell!
- "Into Battle"
{Ensiferum}

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Vanessa
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Post by Vanessa » Tue February 5th, 2013, 9:23 am

I watched the programme about this last night - it was fascinating. The lady from the Richard III Society got quite tearful when she watched the bones being laid out. The facial reconstruction was great!

I live near Towton and the local historical society often find bones and other articles.
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Lisa
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Post by Lisa » Tue February 5th, 2013, 10:17 am

He's good looking, yes, but it's ruined for me because he really looks like my horrible ex (except my ex had short hair). So I'll only picture Richard III looking like that when reading stories that portray him as an evil villain!

annis
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Post by annis » Tue February 5th, 2013, 7:32 pm

Couldn't help chuckling at the gushy remark made by one of the RIII Society ladies:
"It doesn't look like the face of a tyrant. I'm sorry but it doesn't. He's very handsome".

I've no axe to grind about RIII one way or the other, but being handsome is no guarantee against villainy or even the basic degree of ruthlessness which was a job requirement for medieval kings.

Lots of people on Twitter having fun with quips like "Now is the winter of our disinterment" and "My kingdom for a hearse" :)
Last edited by annis on Wed February 6th, 2013, 2:41 am, edited 3 times in total.

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Wed February 6th, 2013, 12:46 am

I thought the programme was flawed. The scientific element was good, the 'Art Garfunkel' hair presenter was rather strange and didn't have the right sort of gravitas - I guess he was supposed to be some sort of everyman. The Richard III lady was loopy. When the body was uncovered with a spine like a question mark I thought she was going to collapse with the shock/horror. You could see her thinking (as the camera in full voyeuristic mode panned over her face - which it did constantly in the prog) 'Nooo, this is not how the script's supposed to go.'
When she saw the reconstruction at the end...if she could have taken that head home with her, she would have done, and probably had a relationship with it! I think the reco looks like Richard III at a glamour shoot for a magazine, having had a spot of photoshopping to smooth him out.

The programme I felt was dumbed-down and sensationalised when compared to the morning's announcements, but I guess it might have entertained the wider public.
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