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Trip to Europe

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Susan
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Post by Susan » Sat April 25th, 2009, 5:04 pm

[quote=""EC2""]It is a fine castle though. I haven't been in a while (isn't that always the case with things local).[/quote]

I was born in New York City and have lived within 50 miles of it for my entire life and yet I have never been to the Statue of Liberty!
~Susan~
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Tanzanite
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Post by Tanzanite » Sat April 25th, 2009, 5:48 pm

Wow - what a bunch of great ideas! Makes me wish we were going for a couple of weeks. Since I've never seen a castle before (the Midwest is not really known for its castles - then again, neither is the US in general :D ) so I don't think I"ll get tired of them on this trip.

Chatterbox
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Post by Chatterbox » Sat April 25th, 2009, 6:08 pm

I think the only castles we have here are those that were dismantled in Europe and shipped in pieces over here during the 'Gilded Age' by all those robber barrons! :rolleyes: So they're either European castles or replicas...

Greenwich is also a good trip. You could easily get to Dover, for the white cliffs and the castle there. It's a good place for picnics on a nice day.

A walking trip itinerary for a weekday: start at the Museum of London in the City (the Square Mile, the heart of the financial district that was once ringed by walls). Walk through the City toward St. Paul's. Then down Ludgate Hill and onto Fleet Street to have a lunch at the Cheshire Cheese (It's on your right as you have St. Paul's at your back, past the big Goldman Sachs building and the McDonalds; go early, right at noon, or around 1:30 to avoid lunchtime crowds.) Then you can walk up Fleet Street to where it becomes the Strand and the Inns of the Court, and prowl around there. From there, keep walking along the Strand (you will pass the main shop of Twining's teas on your left) and you will come to Charing Cross station (stop and admire Edward I's tribute to his 'chere reine', shielded by netting to protect it from birds...). Drop in at St. Martin's in the Fields Church, and then visit either the National Gallery or the National Portrait Gallery. End the day with a short wander up Charing Cross Road (onetime center of the book retailing industry, now a shadow of itself. Duck down a little passage to the right, called Cecil Court, and check out some of the surviving antiquarian booksellers. When your feet give out, you are only steps from Leceister Square tube. If it's not too late, hop on the Piccadilly Line for Piccadilly Circus, and go to Fortnum and Mason for afternoon tea in their ground floor restaurant, behind the food court.

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Sat April 25th, 2009, 6:26 pm

Speaking of American Castles-- when you get home, pop down to Colorado Springs and check out Glen Eyrie -- a railroad baron's castle replica set in the most amazing scenery (pure western jaw-drop) right next to the Garden of the Gods national monument.

A genuine collection of imported European castleness, complete with a quite inventive nineteenth-century fire-prevention system born of the owner seeing his hotel go up in flames.

And it you get to California, don't miss Hearst Castle!

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Lauryn
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Post by Lauryn » Sat April 25th, 2009, 7:41 pm

[quote=""MLE""]Speaking of American Castles-- when you get home, pop down to Colorado Springs and check out Glen Eyrie -- a railroad baron's castle replica set in the most amazing scenery (pure western jaw-drop) right next to the Garden of the Gods national monument.

A genuine collection of imported European castleness, complete with a quite inventive nineteenth-century fire-prevention system born of the owner seeing his hotel go up in flames.

And it you get to California, don't miss Hearst Castle![/quote]

LOL, I worked at Casa Loma in Toronto during university. While it was great fun, my absolute favourite tourists were the Europeans who knew how crazy that castle was. I told one woman to imagine the castle that too much money & imagination, and not enough architectural knowledge, would build, then appreciate the property as a monument to that imagination. There's the Scottish Tower, the Norman Tower, Peacock Alley, a replica of the Stone of Scone (in its throne), a secret tunnel, a secret staircase, WWII spy stories, and one of the earliest elevators ever installed in a private residence. Sir Henry Pellatt's Folly, indeed! :D
Even the mighty oak was once just a nut that held its ground.

Chatterbox
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Post by Chatterbox » Sat April 25th, 2009, 11:25 pm

OT -- Lauryn, my parents had their wedding reception at Casa Loma in 1959...

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Lauryn
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Post by Lauryn » Sun April 26th, 2009, 7:52 am

[quote=""Chatterbox""]OT -- Lauryn, my parents had their wedding reception at Casa Loma in 1959...[/quote]

And what a fairy-tale place to do it! I worked a number of weddings there, and loved every one. (The medieval Christmas wedding was gorgeous - all the guests and the wedding party were apparently in the local Creative anachronisms group! :D )
Even the mighty oak was once just a nut that held its ground.

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Tanzanite
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Post by Tanzanite » Sun April 26th, 2009, 7:41 pm

I really wish I had month to spend in England. But since I don't, my husband decided he really, really wanted to go to Wales to see a couple of castles so we decided to spend a night there and make it a day and a half trip. We're planning on taking the very early train to Cardiff and from there seeing Caerphilly Castle, Cardiff Castle, Tintern Abbey and Chepstow Castle. I'm sure it will be a very long day and a half, but at this point we are planning on being seriously sleep deprived while we are there. I'm taking two days off work after we get back to recouperate!

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Sun April 26th, 2009, 8:50 pm

I've never been to Caerphilly and Cardiff castles Tanzanite. Chepstow has William Marshal's door in the exhibit room. The tree ring dating puts them at the early 1190's when he was first lord there and he would have commissioned them - and then seen them whenever he was in residence. It gave me a real frisson to see them. Tintern, when we went had a kind of romantic, melancholy air. Sort of reminded me of the music of Lord of the Rings in Lothlorien.
Fingers crossed that you have a wonderful time!
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

Ash
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Post by Ash » Mon April 27th, 2009, 3:54 am

My memory of Cardiff castle is the wonderful stone animals on the outer walls.

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