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Divia
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Post by Divia » Thu February 6th, 2014, 2:03 am

[quote=""Nefret""]True. Though I still might read the whole series, or attempt to anyway.[/quote]

You are a braver person than I!

I haven't been able to read her stuff since the joan of arc book...
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.
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Nefret
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Favourite HF book: Welsh Princes trilogy
Preferred HF: The Middle Ages (England), New Kingdom Egypt, Medieval France
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Post by Nefret » Thu February 6th, 2014, 2:14 am

[quote=""Divia""]You are a braver person than I!

I haven't been able to read her stuff since the joan of arc book...[/quote]

Which one was the Joan of Arc book?
Into battle we ride with Gods by our side
We are strong and not afraid to die
We have an urge to kill and our lust for blood has to be fulfilled
WE´LL FIGHT TILL THE END! And send our enemies straight to Hell!
- "Into Battle"
{Ensiferum}

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Lisa
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Favourite HF book: Here Be Dragons by Sharon Kay Penman
Preferred HF: Any time period/location. Timeslip, usually prefer female POV. Also love Gothic melodrama.
Location: Northeast Scotland

Post by Lisa » Thu February 6th, 2014, 12:01 pm

[quote=""Nefret""]Probably. And there was a Moorish dancing outfit?[/quote]

Yeah, unfortunately there's a scene soon after Arthur and Katherine reach Ludlow Castle. Arthur has been ignoring Katherine, so she decides to 'seduce' him one night by wearing a see-through Moorish outfit that she brought with her from the Alhambra, and telling him stories of Spain. That's what I recall anyway, I think it's been six or seven years since I read it.

Oh and Joan of Arc book will be The Red Queen I think, Margaret Beaufort is obsessed in that novel. That's also when I stopped reading PG.

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princess garnet
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Post by princess garnet » Thu February 6th, 2014, 11:26 pm

[quote=""Nefret""]Which one was the Joan of Arc book?[/quote]
She appears briefly in Lady of the Rivers.

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Thu February 6th, 2014, 11:41 pm

[quote=""princess garnet""]She appears briefly in Lady of the Rivers.[/quote]

yes I think thats it and the lady kept saying she was Joan of Arc every other page.
News, views, and reviews on books and graphic novels for young adult.
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Nefret
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Post by Nefret » Mon February 10th, 2014, 5:07 am

[quote=""Divia""]yes I think thats it and the lady kept saying she was Joan of Arc every other page.[/quote]

Some besides Joan of Arc was claiming to be her all the time?



Oh, and I read on the Historical Novel Society site that Sharon Kay Penman will have a new book in her mystery series, but I forgot to get the title.
Into battle we ride with Gods by our side
We are strong and not afraid to die
We have an urge to kill and our lust for blood has to be fulfilled
WE´LL FIGHT TILL THE END! And send our enemies straight to Hell!
- "Into Battle"
{Ensiferum}

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Mythica
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Preferred HF: European and American (mostly pre-20th century)
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Post by Mythica » Sun March 9th, 2014, 8:36 pm

Let me know if I repeat myself, I'm starting to forget what I already posted!

The Tiger Queens: The Women of Genghis Khan by Stephanie Thornton
November 4, 2014

In the late twelfth century, across the sweeping Mongolian grasslands, brilliant, charismatic Temujin ascends to power, declaring himself the Great, or Genghis, Khan. But it is the women who stand beside him who ensure his triumph....

After her mother foretells an ominous future for her, gifted Borte becomes an outsider within her clan. When she seeks comfort in the arms of aristocratic traveler Jamuka, she discovers he is the blood brother of Temujin, the man who agreed to marry her and then abandoned her long before they could wed.

Temujin will return and make Borte his queen, yet it will take many women to safeguard his fragile new kingdom. Their daughter, the fierce Alaqai, will ride and shoot an arrow as well as any man. Fatima, an elegant Persian captive, will transform her desire for revenge into an unbreakable loyalty. And Sorkhokhtani, a demure widow, will position her sons to inherit the empire when it begins to fracture from within.

In a world lit by fire and ruled by the sword, the tiger queens of Genghis Khan come to depend on one another as they fight and love, scheme and sacrifice, all for the good of their family...and the greatness of the People of the Felt Walls.

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Last edited by Mythica on Sun March 9th, 2014, 8:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Mythica
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Post by Mythica » Sun March 9th, 2014, 8:47 pm

Bitter Greens: A Novel by Kate Forsyth
US Release September 23, 2014
(Previously published in the UK)

Charlotte-Rose de la Force has been banished from the court of Versailles by the Sun King, Louis XIV, after a series of scandalous love affairs. She is comforted by an old nun, Sœur Seraphina, who tells her the tale of a young girl who, a hundred years earlier, is sold by her parents for a handful of bitter greens...

After Margherita's father steals from the walled garden of the courtesan Selena Leonelli, he is threatened with having both hands cut off, unless he and his wife give away their little girl. Selena is the famous red-haired muse of the artist Tiziano, first painted by him in 1512 and still inspiring him at the time of his death. Selena is at the center of Renaissance life in Venice, a world of beauty and danger, seduction and betrayal, love and superstition.

Locked away in a tower, Margherita sings in the hope that someone will hear her. One day, a young man does.

This sumptuous novel holds the stories of three women, braided together to create a compelling tale of desire, black magic and the redemptive power of love. A finalist for three awards, Bitter Greens is an impressive feat of storytelling.

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Mythica
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Post by Mythica » Sun March 9th, 2014, 8:55 pm

The Miniaturist: A Novel by Jessie Burton
UK: July 3, 2014
US: August 26, 2014

Set in seventeenth century Amsterdam—a city ruled by glittering wealth and oppressive religion—a masterful debut steeped in atmosphere and shimmering with mystery, in the tradition of Emma Donoghue, Sarah Waters, and Sarah Dunant.

”There is nothing hidden that will not be revealed . . .“

On a brisk autumn day in 1686, eighteen-year-old Nella Oortman arrives in Amsterdam to begin a new life as the wife of illustrious merchant trader Johannes Brandt. But her new home, while splendorous, is not welcoming. Johannes is kind yet distant, always locked in his study or at his warehouse office—leaving Nella alone with his sister, the sharp-tongued and forbidding Marin.

But Nella’s world changes when Johannes presents her with an extraordinary wedding gift: a cabinet-sized replica of their home. To furnish her gift, Nella engages the services of a miniaturist—an elusive and enigmatic artist whose tiny creations mirror their real-life counterparts in eerie and unexpected ways . . .

Johannes’ gift helps Nella to pierce the closed world of the Brandt household. But as she uncovers its unusual secrets, she begins to understand—and fear—the escalating dangers that await them all. In this repressively pious society where gold is worshipped second only to God, to be different is a threat to the moral fabric of society, and not even a man as rich as Johannes is safe. Only one person seems to see the fate that awaits them. Is the miniaturist the key to their salvation . . . or the architect of their destruction?

Enchanting, beautiful, and exquisitely suspenseful, The Miniaturist is a magnificent story of love and obsession, betrayal and retribution, appearance and truth.

UK / US Covers
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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Mon March 10th, 2014, 12:09 am

I think this is NF, and forgive me if it's been posted before (I don't recall it). Came across this when trolling the library's digital catalog. I'm in position 13 out of 37, so I'll report back later on how it is.

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In 1810, John Jacob Astor sent out two advance parties to settle the wild, unclaimed western coast of North America. More than half of his men died violent deaths. The others survived starvation, madness, and greed to shape the destiny of a continent.

At a time when the edge of American settlement barely reached beyond the Appalachian Mountains, two visionaries, President Thomas Jefferson and millionaire John Jacob Astor, foresaw that one day the Pacific would dominate world trade as much as the Atlantic did in their day. Just two years after the Lewis and Clark expedition concluded in 1806, Jefferson and Astor turned their sights westward once again. Thus began one of history's dramatic but largely forgotten turning points in the conquest of the North American continent.

Astoria is the harrowing tale of the quest to settle a Jamestown-like colony on the Pacific coast. Astor set out to establish a global trade network based at the mouth of the Columbia River in what is now Oregon, while Jefferson envisioned a separate democracy on the western coast that would spread eastward to meet the young United States.

Astor backed this ambitious enterprise with the vast for-tune he'd made in the fur trade and in New York real estate since arriving in the United States as a near-penniless immigrant soon after the Revolutionary War. He dispatched two groups of men west: one by sea around the southern tip of South America and one by land over the Rockies. The Overland Party, led by the gentlemanly American businessman Wilson Price Hunt, combined French-Canadian voyageurs, Scottish fur traders, American woodsmen, and an extraordinary Native American woman with two toddlers. The Seagoing Party, sailing aboard the ship Tonquin, likewise was a volatile microcosm of contemporary North America. Under the bitter eye of Captain Jonathan Thorn, a young U.S. naval hero whose unyielding, belligerent nature was better suited to battle than to negotiating cultural differences, the Tonquin made tumultuous progress toward its violent end.

Unfolding from 1810 to 1813, Astoria is a tale of high adventure and incredible hardship, drawing extensively on firsthand accounts of those who made the journey. Though the colony itself would be short-lived, its founders opened provincial American eyes to the remarkable potential of the western coast, discovered the route that became the Oregon Trail, and permanently altered the nation's landscape and global standing.
At home with a good book and the cat...
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