Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

What are you reading June 2012?

For discussions of historical fiction. Threads that do not relate to historical fiction should be started in the Chat forum or elsewhere on the forum, depending on the topic.
Post Reply
User avatar
Susan
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3746
Joined: August 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA

Post by Susan » Sun June 10th, 2012, 7:46 pm

Her Highness, The Traitor by Susan Higginbotham
~Susan~
~Unofficial Royalty~
Royal news updated daily, information and discussion about royalty past and present
http://www.unofficialroyalty.com/

User avatar
Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 9581
Joined: August 2008
Location: Seattle, WA

Post by Misfit » Sun June 10th, 2012, 11:46 pm

Took a sideline to read the infamous Fifty Shades of Grey (via library, I did not line anyone's pockets). What an interesting mess, but had a gas at Goodreads yesterday sharing comments and updates. Back to Stone Hill by William Lavender. American revolution, Carolina setting.
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 2475
Joined: August 2008
Location: Arizona, USA

Post by Ash » Mon June 11th, 2012, 12:05 am

[quote=""MLE""]I need to finish the Dove-keepers for a book group. I was told it was fantastic, but 50 pages in it's not feeling so compelling.[/quote]

I found it very tiresome after a while.

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 2475
Joined: August 2008
Location: Arizona, USA

Post by Ash » Mon June 11th, 2012, 12:08 am

[quote=""Brenna""]I am enjoying it so far, but I'm only 50 or pages in. I hadn't realized that Anne and Mary's mother portrayed in PG's book and "The Other Boelyn" movie wasn't her real mom. Interesting...[/quote]

Readers of her work usually need to expect that. She's not as historically accurate as I expect HF to be, but thats just me.

Shes not the central character, but probably the best look at Anne that I have ever read is in Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall and in Bring Up The Bodies where she obviously has a more central role. All that background can't help but give you a sense of her, even if she isn't on the page at every moment.

Now reading the Autobiography of Mark Twain Vol 1, just released in paperback. Im on page 50 and have scared the cats off my chair several times with my sudden laughter.
Last edited by Ash on Mon June 11th, 2012, 12:11 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Tanzanite
Bibliophile
Posts: 1963
Joined: August 2008
Location: Northern Virginia
Contact:

Post by Tanzanite » Mon June 11th, 2012, 1:11 am

Pulled another OOP from my stack - Alice by Sandra Wilson (one of the main characters is Piers Gaveston)

User avatar
Brenna
Bibliophile
Posts: 1358
Joined: June 2010
Location: Delaware

Post by Brenna » Mon June 11th, 2012, 12:25 pm

[quote=""Ash""]Readers of her work usually need to expect that. She's not as historically accurate as I expect HF to be, but thats just me.

Shes not the central character, but probably the best look at Anne that I have ever read is in Hilary Mantel's Wolf Hall and in Bring Up The Bodies where she obviously has a more central role. All that background can't help but give you a sense of her, even if she isn't on the page at every moment.

Now reading the Autobiography of Mark Twain Vol 1, just released in paperback. Im on page 50 and have scared the cats off my chair several times with my sudden laughter.[/quote]

I finished the Concubine last night and I have to say I was a bit disappointed, but perhaps unfairly so. When I first bought this book, I thought it would tell Anne's story from her perspective. Instead, it was more of a retelling of Henry and his "issues" regarding Catherine, himself, Jane, etc. The parts I truly enjoyed were when Anne made an appearance which wasn't as much as I would have liked. I think another reason I didn't enjoy this one as much is because it's like the 5th book I've read about the Tudors since April. I think I should start spacing these books out a bit more.
Brenna

User avatar
sweetpotatoboy
Bibliophile
Posts: 1641
Joined: August 2008
Location: London, UK

Post by sweetpotatoboy » Mon June 11th, 2012, 1:24 pm

Not HF, but just started "The Perks of Being a Wallflower" by Stephen Chbosky.

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4233
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Post by Vanessa » Mon June 11th, 2012, 5:33 pm

I'm just about to start The Art of the Engine Driver by Steven Carroll.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 2475
Joined: August 2008
Location: Arizona, USA

Post by Ash » Tue June 12th, 2012, 2:30 am

When I first bought this book, I thought it would tell Anne's story from her perspective. Instead, it was more of a retelling of Henry and his "issues" regarding Catherine, himself, Jane, etc.
I understand that, but I find that knowing how other people around her felt or acted is often a way of knowing her in a round about way. Another Loft book is a good example of that - For the King's Pleasure is about Katherine of Aragon. While Henry and Anne say nary a word, you get a sense of both of them through her eyes and her story. The scene where Anne comes to take the queen's jewels from Katherine had me in tears, and any sympathy I ever had for Anne went out the window. I never cared much about Katherine until I read this book. She was sorely used and abused.

J.D. Oswald
Reader
Posts: 84
Joined: May 2012

Post by J.D. Oswald » Tue June 12th, 2012, 8:53 am

[quote=""Madeleine""]I'll let you know JD! I can see what you mean about the writing style but it doesn't feel as "dated" as I thought it would.[/quote]
There's quite a clever continuation of the Sherlock Holmes stories by Michael Chabon, The Final Solution. It's short but I enjoyed it.

Post Reply

Return to “General Discussion”