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British Theatre

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Rowan
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British Theatre

Post by Rowan » Mon March 19th, 2012, 1:04 pm

Over the weekend I worked at our local theatre for the opening weekend of The Lion King. On Saturday afternoon, before the show started, there was a woman who mentioned how she and her daughter saw it in London and their seating sections are called different names than here.

Ours are:

orchestra (nearest the stage)
parquet (slightly elevated above and behind the orchestra seating)
lower and upper balcony

What's different across the pond?

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Mon March 19th, 2012, 2:17 pm

I think over here the upper and lower balcony are called the upper and lower circle, although I think I have seen balcony used as well, it might depend on the size of the theatre. We also have the dress circle - not quite sure what that is, I'm not that much of a theatre-goer - and the downstairs auditorium is called the stalls.

Edited to say that I've just looked at a couple of the larger London theatres and, whilst they both have an upper circle, what you call the lower balcony is, in one theatre, the Dress Circle, and in another the Grand Circle, although it's the same seating area on their plans. The Theatre Royal Drury Lane - one of the largest - does have a Balcony above the Upper Circle; I would hate to see how high those seats are. That higher area is often referred to as "up in the gods".
Last edited by Madeleine on Mon March 19th, 2012, 2:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Mon March 19th, 2012, 5:15 pm

[quote=""Madeleine""] That higher area is often referred to as "up in the gods".[/quote]

One of the house managers here calls both balcony areas "heaven". LOL

Thanks for the info!

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Post by SGM » Mon March 19th, 2012, 6:51 pm

[quote=""Rowan""]One of the house managers here calls both balcony areas "heaven". LOL

Thanks for the info!
[/quote]

That's probably what we call the "Gods" -- right at the top of the theatre.

I saw the Lion King in London but that is not surprising as that's where I live. I must admit that on my way to see it, I wondered why on earth I had agreed to go. But it came as real surprise to be and I really enjoyed it. The spectacle, particularly at the beginning was great. There were some really cheesy bits to it but they didn't spoil my enjoyment.

PS: The BBC recently had a programmed called "The Story of Musicals". It should really have been called "Story of British Musicals". I watched the first two out of four programmes but the last two seem to have disappeared from the schedule. I am now very frustrated but I did discover that Lionel Bart who wrote Oliver neither read nor wrote music. Just goes to show. Unfortunately, he died in poverty.
Last edited by SGM on Mon March 19th, 2012, 6:54 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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