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March 2012 Feature of the Month: Trojan War Month

A monthly discussion on varying themes guided by our members. (Book of the Month discussions through December 2011 can be found in this section too.)
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lauragill
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Post by lauragill » Sun March 4th, 2012, 7:44 pm

I checked out Memorial, and am quite intrigued. It's like the Catalogue of Ships, just with dead men, and her verse is very Homeric.
Last edited by lauragill on Mon March 5th, 2012, 8:13 am, edited 1 time in total.
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annis
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Post by annis » Mon March 5th, 2012, 6:08 pm

Has anyone tackled Christopher Logue's modernist poetic interpretation of the Iliad? The bits I've come across seem quite strikingly powerful in their imagery. I keep meaning to make the effort - maybe I'd better get on to it, or like Logue himself, I'll run out of time :)

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lauragill
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Post by lauragill » Mon March 5th, 2012, 7:09 pm

[quote=""annis""]Has anyone tackled Christopher Logue's modernist poetic interpretation of the Iliad? The bits I've come across seem quite strikingly powerful in their imagery. I keep meaning to make the effort - maybe I'd better get on to it, or like Logue himself, I'll run out of time :) [/quote]

I hadn't heard of Logue's work, but the bits excerpted in the article you linked are very tempting. I'm quite enjoying all the new works being added to my TBR list.

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The Czar
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Post by The Czar » Mon March 5th, 2012, 7:46 pm

[quote=""Ludmilla""]A few more books I can think of:

Finally, does anyone have a favorite scene from the Trojan War? I still think the most emotionally affecting scene in the epic is when Priam goes to Achilles to ask for Hector's body.[/quote]

I've always liked the duel of Hector and Achilles.

That "scene" is the only thing that even slightly redeems the Brad Pitt as Achilles movie version from a few years ago.


Funny story...

Once time, some friends and I went to see a movie. As we were lushes back then, we snuck a few "call a cab's" (a frozen concoction starring Pure Grain Alcohol) into the theatre from the place next door.

So our movie ended, and we were feeling no pain. Another movie, "Troy" as it turned out, ended at the same time.

So we're walking out of the theatre, and I overhear some guy saying "I wonder if that's where they got Trojan Horse from?"

"Yes, and achillies heel, beware of greeks bearing gifts, and a host of other sayings too. Oh, and I suspect the name of Trojan condoms is based on the impenetrable walls of Illium. Moron." I shout back, as my friends hustle me from the theatre before I get a beating.

A smartass book snob + alcohol + morons = a bad situation.
Whoever wishes to foresee the future must consult the past; for human events ever resemble those of preceding times. This arises from the fact that they are produced by men who ever have been, and ever shall be, animated by the same passions, and thus they necessarily have the same results.
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Nefret
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Post by Nefret » Mon March 5th, 2012, 9:06 pm

That's hilarious! :D


I don't remember exactly... but wasn't the horse mention not in Homer's works, but the Aenied? It seems to show up in most modern fiction.
Into battle we ride with Gods by our side
We are strong and not afraid to die
We have an urge to kill and our lust for blood has to be fulfilled
WE´LL FIGHT TILL THE END! And send our enemies straight to Hell!
- "Into Battle"
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annis
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Post by annis » Mon March 5th, 2012, 9:34 pm

It's first mentioned in Homer's Odyssey:
But come now, change thy theme, and sing of the building of the horse of wood, which Epeius made with Athena's help, the horse which once Odysseus led up into the citadel as a thing of guile, when he had filled it with the men who sacked Ilios.

The story of the Trojan Horse also appears in greater detail in Virgil's later Aeneid.
Last edited by annis on Mon March 5th, 2012, 9:49 pm, edited 5 times in total.

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Nefret
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Post by Nefret » Mon March 5th, 2012, 10:16 pm

Oh, thanks. I forgot the specifics. :o

I liked the duel between Hector and Achilles as well.
Into battle we ride with Gods by our side
We are strong and not afraid to die
We have an urge to kill and our lust for blood has to be fulfilled
WE´LL FIGHT TILL THE END! And send our enemies straight to Hell!
- "Into Battle"
{Ensiferum}

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Post by Carla » Tue March 6th, 2012, 12:07 pm

[quote=""Ludmilla""]
I can't think of too many books other than the bible that have had such an impact on western cultures as Homer's Iliad, which makes me wonder -- outside the well known example of Rome -- how many societies have incorporated descent from characters in the Iliad in their own founding myths (e.g., didn't the Franks?).

[/quote]

The early medieval Britons did too; one of the origin stories in Historia Brittonum (written probably in North Wales in the early ninth century) says that the Britons were descended from Brutus who was a descendant of Aeneas grandson of King Priam.

I really like Song of Troy by Colleen McCullough. It's written from multiple points of view, with each chapter narrated by a different person telling their story (some people get several chapters, some only one). I liked that, because you get to see events from different sides, and also get to see each character on their own terms. And she writes so well, with the same salty humour as in the earlier Masters of Rome books.
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Ludmilla
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Post by Ludmilla » Tue March 6th, 2012, 2:42 pm

[quote=""annis""]It's first mentioned in Homer's Odyssey:
But come now, change thy theme, and sing of the building of the horse of wood, which Epeius made with Athena's help, the horse which once Odysseus led up into the citadel as a thing of guile, when he had filled it with the men who sacked Ilios.

The story of the Trojan Horse also appears in greater detail in Virgil's later Aeneid.[/quote]

Baricco appends his retelling of the Iliad with the story of the wooden horse. One of the most chilling moments is when Helen circles the horse and starts speaking (or singing--can't remember which) in the voices of the wives of the Greeks hidden in the horse. This is excruciating for the men hidden in the horse. Odysseus has to cover the mouth of one of his men to keep him from crying out. The way that scene is told is very cinematic.
Last edited by Ludmilla on Thu March 8th, 2012, 6:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Fixed spelling of author's name.

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The Czar
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Post by The Czar » Tue March 6th, 2012, 9:20 pm

Didn't Julius Caesar claim to be descended from Aneas, through the line of the Kings of Alba Longa?
Whoever wishes to foresee the future must consult the past; for human events ever resemble those of preceding times. This arises from the fact that they are produced by men who ever have been, and ever shall be, animated by the same passions, and thus they necessarily have the same results.
_______________________________________________
Niccolò di Bernardo dei Machiavelli

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