Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

What Are You Reading? March 2012

For discussions of historical fiction. Threads that do not relate to historical fiction should be started in the Chat forum or elsewhere on the forum, depending on the topic.
annis
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4585
Joined: August 2008

Post by annis » Fri March 2nd, 2012, 8:00 pm

Just finished Mal Peet's Tamar, a story set around the Dutch underground resistance during the Second World, and the consequences of events which took place. A tense and powerful story- as Ludmilla said elsewhere, only YA by the skinniest margin. Only complaint- I worked out the answer to the central mystery very early on, but darn it, I'm used to that happening...

User avatar
Brenna
Bibliophile
Posts: 1358
Joined: June 2010
Location: Delaware

Post by Brenna » Sun March 4th, 2012, 10:41 pm

Edith Pargeter's A Bloody Field by Shrewsbury. Fihally finished Wainwright's Within the Fetterlock. Still one of my all time favorites which is what it took so long to read. I wanted to enjoy every second.
Brenna

User avatar
Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 9581
Joined: August 2008
Location: Seattle, WA

Post by Misfit » Sun March 4th, 2012, 11:14 pm

[quote=""Brenna""]Edith Pargeter's A Bloody Field by Shrewsbury. Fihally finished Wainwright's Within the Fetterlock. Still one of my all time favorites which is what it took so long to read. I wanted to enjoy every second.[/quote]

I need to reread Fetterlock one of these days. Finished off Angelique in Love and a good point in the series to take a break since it ends without any cliffhangers. Going to go sailing on the SS Kroonland with She Wore Only White by Dorthe Binkert. Apprently this was published in Germany in 2008 and is now translated in English.
Last edited by Misfit on Sun March 4th, 2012, 11:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be

User avatar
TiciaRoma
Reader
Posts: 149
Joined: October 2011
Location: Alexandria, VA

Post by TiciaRoma » Mon March 5th, 2012, 12:57 am

Queen of the Lightning by Kathleen Herbert.

and Believing the Lie by Elizabeth George

Both are set in Cumbria, though 1400 years apart.
Tish

"If you would tell me the heart of a man, tell me not what he reads but what he rereads." Nobel Laureate Francois Mauriac

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 2475
Joined: August 2008
Location: Arizona, USA

Post by Ash » Mon March 5th, 2012, 1:51 am

Queen of America by Luis Urrea, sequel to Hummingbird's Daughter.The first book takes place in the late 1800s, about a young girl living in Northern Mexico who is called a saint by the Yaqui Indians because of her healing. The second book focuses on her families migration to America and their life there. Fascinating story, based on the author's family, and interesting look at the country at the turn of the century.

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4260
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Post by Vanessa » Mon March 5th, 2012, 9:34 am

A Game of Sorrows by Shona MacLean, the second in the Alexander Seaton mystery series set in 1628.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
fljustice
Bibliophile
Posts: 1995
Joined: March 2010
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Contact:

Post by fljustice » Mon March 5th, 2012, 3:52 pm

Finished a SF/F/H collection of poems and short stories, by a friend of mine, that is up for the Bram Stoker Award this year: How to Recognize a Demon Has Become Your Friend by Linda Addison. Creepy, funny, imaginative!

Started The Children of Tantalus: Niobe and Pelops by Victoria Grossack; enjoying it so far.
Last edited by fljustice on Mon March 5th, 2012, 4:29 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Faith L. Justice, Author Website
Image

User avatar
Ludmilla
Bibliophile
Posts: 1346
Joined: September 2008
Location: Georgia USA

Post by Ludmilla » Mon March 5th, 2012, 5:52 pm

Finishing up Michael Crummey's River Thieves today which is about white settlers' encounters with the vanishing Beothuk tribe in Newfoundland circa early 19th century. I picked this up after reading Crummey's Galore which turned out to be one of the best novels I've read in a long time. Most of the characters in RT are known historical figures, including naval officer/Arctic explorer David Buchan. This was Crummey's debut novel, but it reads like a work of a seasoned author.

annis
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4585
Joined: August 2008

Post by annis » Mon March 5th, 2012, 6:17 pm

Posted by Ludmilla
Finishing up Michael Crummey's River Thieves today which is about white settlers' encounters with the vanishing Beothuk tribe in Newfoundland circa early 19th century.
I read this a few years ago and have never forgotten it- it's a most haunting story and parable about the tragedy of cultural misunderstanding.

Just about finished The Year-God's Daughter by Rebecca Lochlann, which I've enjoyed. It's set in Minoan Crete around the period just before its civilization is overwhelmed by the Mycenaeans, and is a vivid evocation of ritual kingship and the clash between the matrilinear culture of the old Goddess religions and the increasingly dominant patriarchal warrior societies represented by the masculine sun gods like Poseidon.

While checking out Lochlann's website for the timing of the next book (as it's clearly the first in a series), I discovered that she has an ambitious cycle in mind crossing the centuries. YGD is just the first of three in the Bronze Age section.

User avatar
princess garnet
Bibliophile
Posts: 1626
Joined: August 2008
Location: Maryland

Post by princess garnet » Mon March 5th, 2012, 9:28 pm

Started Royal Flush by Margaret Irwin
It's about Charles & Henrietta Maria's youngest daughter, Minette, as she was known

Post Reply

Return to “General Discussion”