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Daughter of York, by Anne Easter Smith

Carla
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Daughter of York, by Anne Easter Smith

Post by Carla » Wed October 1st, 2008, 12:45 pm

Edition reviewed: Touchstone 2008, ISBN 978-0-7432-7731-0. 557 pages.

Set in England and the Burgundian Low Countries (approximately modern Belgium, the Netherlands and parts of northern France) in 1461–1480, Daughter of York tells part of the story of Margaret of York, sister of Edward IV and Richard III. Most of the main characters are historical. Margaret’s ladies-in-waiting are fictional, including her close confidante the Italian dwarf Fortunata, who is quite an important secondary character, and there’s a walk-on part for Kate Haute, heroine of the author’s previous novel A Rose for the Crown.

Since the deaths of her father and brother in the struggle between the House of York and the House of Lancaster for the English throne, known to history as the Wars of the Roses, Margaret of York has understood that family prestige comes before all else, however high its price. As a woman, she knows that her contribution to the power of the York family will be to make a political marriage. When the time comes, Margaret embarks on the glittering match her family has chosen for her, determined to do her duty to her family, her new husband, and her new country. But Margaret has a dangerous secret; she has fallen hopelessly in love with another man, the handsome and cultured Sir Anthony Woodville. Can Margaret keep her secret, and will she ever know happiness in love?

I admit the first few chapters of Daughter of York nearly put me off, as our tall, striking and intelligent heroine establishes her ‘relevance’ to modern readers by dreading the prospect of being “used as a pawn” in an arranged marriage, despising her maids in waiting as “simpering” girls, and ogling handsome heralds. Fortunately, these warning signals turned out to be largely false alarms, and during the rest of the book most of Margaret’s behaviour was more or less plausible for a medieval lady. Indeed, the defining characteristic of the novel turned out to be a plethora of historical detail. In the Question and Answer interview at the back of the book, the author says, “….if we had them, almost all the pages of my book would have a surprising number of footnotes,” and I can well believe it. Sometimes the sheer weight of research information got a little tedious for my taste, and I found myself skimming descriptions of Margaret’s costumes and lists of dishes served at feasts. But readers who want to know what the well-dressed duchess was wearing in 1470, the menu for a coronation banquet, or the method for making blue pigment for illuminated manuscripts, will love Daughter of York. Sometimes there was a wry little aside to leaven the mix, such as a comment about the unflattering effect of the fashionable ultra-short men’s coat [http://susandhigginbotham.blogspot.com/ ... ters.html] on a middle-aged courtier of ample girth, or the tendency of a two-foot steeple hennin [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hennin] (those tall cone-shaped head-dresses worn by great ladies at the time) to poke people in the eye.

Margaret is the central character, and although the novel is narrated in third person almost everything is seen from Margaret’s point of view. Luckily she is a fairly sympathetic narrator, intelligent, sensible and interested in the world around her. The role of a great lady involved much more than looking decorative and doing tapestry. For a start, managing an aristocratic household of well over a hundred people, all with different ranks and responsibilities, was far from an easy job. A modern analogy might be the Managing Director of a five-star hotel, or, in Margaret’s case with well over a dozen ducal residences, a chain of five-star hotels. Watching Margaret establish her authority over her staff, using a mixture of charm, tact and – when all else fails – blackmail, demonstrates her evident talent for what would today be called personnel management. As her husband spends most of his time away at war, leaving Margaret to run his dukedom in his absence, her role also has large components of Ambassador and Prime Minister thrown in. I found Margaret’s political ability much more interesting than her rather tepid – and, it seemed to me, rather one-sided – romance with Anthony Woodville, and was disappointed that the novel ended in 1480. By finishing then it misses out the years in which Margaret was effectively ruler of Burgundy and made Henry Tudor’s life a misery by funding successive attempts to unseat him, leading him to call her “this Diabolicall Duchess”. Still, Perkin Warbeck appears in a cameo role, with sufficient detail of his identity and history to suggest that he may be going to be the central character in a sequel, so perhaps this part of Margaret’s life will be explored then.

I didn’t find the (fictional) romance between Margaret and Anthony Woodville at all convincing. The author is candid that the relationship is fictional, based on a visit by Margaret to Anthony’s estate in Kent on her way to Dover and on their shared love of books. I don’t have a problem with that – we don’t know that they didn’t have a romance, so it’s fair game to imagine one – but Anthony’s behaviour in the novel was hard to reconcile with a genuine love for Margaret. The author says in her Author’s Note, “…men have a hard time facing conflict in a romantic relationship, and I imagined he was no different,” which to me seems decidedly lame.

Among the secondary characters, it was good to meet William Caxton, famous for having introduced the printing press to England. In the novel he is a gruff, canny, competent merchant adventurer, on whom Margaret can rely when she needs discreet help with mildly nefarious activities. Margaret’s husband, Charles le Temeraire (Charles the Bold), whom I had previously encountered as the defeated adversary of a local French heroine called Joan the Hatchet [http://carlanayland.blogspot.com/2006/1 ... anne.html], is scarcely developed beyond a self-important bully. No doubt this helps to justify Margaret’s romantic yearnings elsewhere, but I got no sense of how Charles had managed to build up Burgundy into a rich and powerful, if short-lived, military empire.

The novel is mainly written in modern English, with no expletives that I noticed. A lot of archaic words and phrases are used, and readers who aren’t experts in the terminology of the European Middle Ages will probably find it helpful to bookmark the glossary at the back of the book where most of them are explained. There’s a list of characters at the front of the book, with notes identifying which are fictional and which historical, and a helpful family tree showing the inter-relationships of the Houses of York and Lancaster. There’s also a map showing the locations mentioned in the novel, very helpful for following Margaret’s journeys around Burgundy. At the back of the book, an Author’s Note and an interview with the author in the form of a question-and-answer session help to separate historical fact from fiction.

Detailed description of life in fifteenth-century Burgundy as seen by Margaret of York, Duchess of Burgundy and sister of Edward IV and Richard III.
Last edited by Carla on Wed October 1st, 2008, 1:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
PATHS OF EXILE - love, war, honour and betrayal in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria
Editor's Choice, Historical Novels Review, August 2009
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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Wed October 1st, 2008, 9:30 pm

I was so excited when I got my copy of this book...and still haven't read it!
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boswellbaxter
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Post by boswellbaxter » Fri October 3rd, 2008, 12:28 pm

What did you think of the Fortunata character? She didn't quite work for me--at times, Smith seemed to be trying to seriously explore what it must have been like to be so markedly physically different from others in medieval times, but at most times the portrayal of her reminded me of one of those cute talking animal sidekicks in Disney movies.

I did like this novel a lot better than its predecessor. I found the heroine in A Rose for a Crown to be very Mary Sue-ish.
Susan Higginbotham
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Post by Carla » Tue October 7th, 2008, 12:45 pm

I didn't really 'get' Fortunata. I found her too cutesy, especially the broken English, and I couldn't fathom how someone as noticeable as her would have been able to act as an unobtrusive go-between for delivering Margaret's secret letters. I can understand the need to give Margaret a confidante - both in real life and in fiction - but I never could figure out why the author chose to make her a dwarf. Nor could I figure out why the author chose to write her out of the story so suddenly and in such a bizarre way. Baffled.

I haven't read the earlier novel, so I can't compare. Is it as detail heavy? I would guess not, given that it seems to be much more romantic.
PATHS OF EXILE - love, war, honour and betrayal in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria
Editor's Choice, Historical Novels Review, August 2009
Now available as e-book on Amazon Kindleand in Kindle, Epub (Nook, Sony Reader), Palm and other formats on Smashwords
Website: http://www.carlanayland.org
Blog: http://carlanayland.blogspot.com

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boswellbaxter
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Post by boswellbaxter » Tue October 7th, 2008, 1:01 pm

I didn't finish A Rose for the Crown (though I did peek to see what happened to the Princes in the Tower), but the part that I read was heavy on detail. The scene in Daughter of York where Kate makes her cameo appearance and everyone duly notes her great beauty and wonderful musicianship is a fairly restrained version of her portrayal in Crown.
Susan Higginbotham
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Carla
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Post by Carla » Tue October 7th, 2008, 2:02 pm

[quote=""boswellbaxter""]I didn't finish A Rose for the Crown (though I did peek to see what happened to the Princes in the Tower), but the part that I read was heavy on detail. The scene in Daughter of York where Kate makes her cameo appearance and everyone duly notes her great beauty and wonderful musicianship is a fairly restrained version of her portrayal in Crown.[/quote]

Oh, dear. I thought it was a sort of trailer for the other book and so the portrayal had to be laid on with a trowel to make sure the reader got the point. If it's restrained, I can see why Mary Sue comes to mind :-)
PATHS OF EXILE - love, war, honour and betrayal in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria
Editor's Choice, Historical Novels Review, August 2009
Now available as e-book on Amazon Kindleand in Kindle, Epub (Nook, Sony Reader), Palm and other formats on Smashwords
Website: http://www.carlanayland.org
Blog: http://carlanayland.blogspot.com

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boswellbaxter
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Post by boswellbaxter » Tue October 7th, 2008, 6:04 pm

[quote=""Carla""]Nor could I figure out why the author chose to write her out of the story so suddenly and in such a bizarre way. Baffled.

[/quote]


I figured it was to tie up her romance with Caxton. He was someone I would have liked to have seen more of in the story, in his role as printer and bookseller rather than as an intermediary in Margaret's love affair and as Fortunata's love interest.
Susan Higginbotham
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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Tue October 7th, 2008, 7:49 pm

Will Caxton is a secondary character in Figure of Silk by Vanora Bennett as well.

In fact, I only ever seem to read about him as a secondary character.
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Amanda
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Post by Amanda » Tue October 7th, 2008, 10:27 pm

He was briefly in "To the Tower Born" by Robin Maxwell too. She had his daughter as the central character and best friend to Elizabeth of York.

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boswellbaxter
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Post by boswellbaxter » Tue October 7th, 2008, 10:32 pm

[quote=""diamondlil""]Will Caxton is a secondary character in Figure of Silk by Vanora Bennett as well.

In fact, I only ever seem to read about him as a secondary character.[/quote]

I'm eagerly awaiting your review!
Susan Higginbotham
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