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Words We Don't Use

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sweetpotatoboy
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Post by sweetpotatoboy » Thu February 2nd, 2012, 11:01 pm

[quote=""Madeleine""]We still have syllabub but it sounds a bit more appetising now! A traditional English dessert made with sherry or white wine, whipped cream and sugar and sometimes infused with lemon.[/quote]

We had syllabub a lot when we were younger (though without the alcohol, I guess). Think my mum still makes it for guests sometimes.

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sweetpotatoboy
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Post by sweetpotatoboy » Thu February 2nd, 2012, 11:03 pm

[quote=""Brenna""]This is more of a phrase we may not use anymore, but does anyone use "our (insert name here)." I'm reading Daughters of Witching Hill and everytime they say a name, the characters always say "our Bess" or "our Jamie." Why?[/quote]

My Mum still refers to her children when talking to others as "my [Justin]" and so on. It's like the extra syllable is part of our names, but we just leave it out when talking amongst ourselves.

annis
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Post by annis » Fri February 3rd, 2012, 8:00 am

In some parts of England our + personal name is an affectionate way of referring to someone, particularly a family member - pretty common in the north and parts of the Midlands.

e.g "our Dorothy, she lives at Watergate, not far away"
Last edited by annis on Fri February 3rd, 2012, 8:02 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Fri February 3rd, 2012, 10:09 am

Yes I always thought it was a more "northern" tradition to say "our Jane" etc.
Currently reading: "Longstone" by L J Ross

annis
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Post by annis » Fri February 3rd, 2012, 5:05 pm

It seems to be a way of claiming someone as part of your clan :)

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DianeL
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Post by DianeL » Sun February 5th, 2012, 5:21 pm

And yet, even Hyacinth Bucket gets the "our" treatment. Ahh the power of family bonds!
"To be the queen, she agreed to be the widow!"

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Mon February 6th, 2012, 2:31 pm

twistin'-in - A term applied by the Luddites [in] 1812 in Lancashire to the swearing-in of a new member of their secret society. ~ Francis Taylor's Folk-Speech of South Lancashire, 1901

chirology - The art of conversing with the hands and fingers. ~ Joseph Worcester's Dictionary of the English Language, 1881

odds fish - A corruption of "God's flesh," or body of Christ. A favorite expression of Charles II. ~ Trench Johnson's Phrases and Names: Their Origins and Meanings, 1906

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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Mon February 6th, 2012, 8:40 pm

Odds fish is also a favorite expression of Sir Charles Blakeney. :D

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Tue February 7th, 2012, 2:00 pm

criticaster - A petty or inferior critic; used in contempt. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1893

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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Wed February 8th, 2012, 4:07 pm

I like that one.

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