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Words We Don't Use

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Thu December 13th, 2012, 3:57 pm

The "free list" is interesting - up until quite recently cinema listings used to say "free list suspended" for certain films, presumably the popular films like the Bonds, Potters etc that they knew would be a sell-out.
Currently reading: "Tidelands" by Philippa Gregory

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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Thu December 13th, 2012, 6:14 pm

[quote=""DianeL""]... anyone else thinking of the publisher Houghton Mifflin ... ? Heh.[/quote]

No but if it weren't for this darned allergy medication I might have. :D

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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Thu December 13th, 2012, 6:16 pm

I would give after-wit a rather wider definition. Such as "the thing you should have said twenty minutes ago that would have been a perfect comeback, possibly a funny one as well, but alas you didn't think of it until now." I suffer from that ailment rather frequently.

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Tue December 18th, 2012, 8:25 pm

Marblehead turkey - A Massachusetts term for a cod fish; also called Cape Cod turkey. There are many instances of fish being spoken of as meat; for example, the sturgeon is known in America as Albany beef, while in England, herrings are nicknamed . . .Billingsgate pheasants when fresh, and a Yarmouth bloater rejoices in the euphonious name of "two-eyed steak." ~ John Farmer's Americanisms, Old and New, 1889

to-year - This year, after the fashion of to-day, to-night, and to-morrow. "It's very serious for farmers to-year." [Also to-month.] ~ R.E.G. Cole's Words Used in South-West Lincolnshire, 1886

dunnekin - A privy, ordural. ~ Appleton Morgan's Study in the Warwickshire Dialect, 1900

Maryland end - A curious name given to the hock end of a ham, the thick end being called the Virginia end. These colloquialisms are current in both the states concerned, and are thought by some to allude to a supposed rough resemblance between the contour line of these states and a ham. Ordinary people, however, will scarcely be able thus to impose upon their imagination. ~ John Farmer's Americanisms, Old and New, 1889

flurn - To think little of, to disparage . . . Neither of the two great . . . lexicographers, Johnson and . . . Webster, seem to have been cognizant of the word. ~ Charles Mackay's Lost Beauties of the English Language, 1874

frigerifick - Causing cold; a word used in science. [From] figorificus, frigus, and facio, Latin. "Frigorific atoms or particles mean those nitrous salts which float in the air in cold weather, and occasion freezing." ~ Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

patterer - Men who cry last dying speeches, &c., in the street, and those who [sell] their wares by long harangues in the public thoroughfares. These men, to use their own term, are the "haristocracy of the street sellers" . . . boasting that they live by their intellect. ~ John Hotten's Slang Dictionary, 1887

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DianeL
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Post by DianeL » Tue December 18th, 2012, 11:50 pm

Frigerifick sounds almost like a late 1950s marketing term for kitchen applicances: "Buy the NEW Frigidaire! It's fridge-errific!" I kind of love it. :)
"To be the queen, she agreed to be the widow!"

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The pre-modern world was willing to attribute charisma to women well before it was willing to attribute sustained rationality to them.
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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Wed December 19th, 2012, 2:01 am

I rather like flurn. Sounds like a cousin to spurn.

annis
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Post by annis » Wed December 19th, 2012, 2:18 am

Dunny - a diminutive of "dunnekin" - is still commonly used in Australia and New Zealand as an alternative name for a toilet- as in, "just off to the dunny, won't be long". "Loo" is also a common term here for a toilet (from the French l'eau =water). Americans tend to ask for "the bathroom" which confuses NZers as bathrooms are pretty uncommon in public buildings and don't necessarily contain a toilet anyway!
Last edited by annis on Wed December 19th, 2012, 2:21 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Wed December 26th, 2012, 2:14 pm

While this isn't on my calendar, I did want to share it since it's in the same vein of this thread. An article from the Daily Mail Online about forgotten Christmas language.

Dear Santa, thanks for the fewtrils and fattrels! (Or cheapo presents in other words, as revealed in our fantabulous guide to the forgotten language of Christmas)

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Thu December 27th, 2012, 4:01 pm

Hull cheese - A strong ale for which the town of Hull was at one time famous. To "eat Hull cheese" was to get incontinently drunk. ~ Trench Johnson's Phrases and Names: Their Origins and Meanings, 1906

placeparted - Set out of the world in peace. ~ Noah Webster's Compendious Dictionary of the English Language, 1806

blarge - To kick a ball vigorously. ~ Michael Traynor's English Dialect of Donegal, 1953

yule-boys - Boys who ramble the country during the Christmas holidays. They are dressed in white, all but one - the "Beelzebub" of the corps. They have a foolish rhyme they [repeat] and so receive bawbees and pieces [two types of coins]. ~ John Mactaggart's Scottish Gallovidian Encyclopedia, 1824

Christmas-book - A book in which people were accustomed to keep an account of the Christmas presents received. ~ Robert Nare's Glossary of the Works of English Authors, 1859

thomassing - It is still the custom for children to go about on that day. At Woodsome Hall, a sack of wheat stood at the door, with a pint measure. All comers who chose to take it were served with a pint of wheat, supposed to be for frumenty. ~ Alfred Easther's Dialects of Almondsbury and Huddersfield, 1883

sheep's-eye - A modest, diffident or sly look, such as lovers cast at their mistresses. ~ Richard Coxe's Pronouncing Dictionary, 1813

To make sheep's eyes, to cast amorous glances towards one on the sly. ~ John Hotten's Slang Dictionary, 1887

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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Sat January 5th, 2013, 7:58 pm

Sheep's eyes is still in use in at least some communities in the US.

I rather like placeparted. Similar to "a place apart."

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