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Words We Don't Use

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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Thu November 15th, 2012, 6:15 pm

Fuffle is nice. I suppose it is the root of one of my favorite words, kerfuffle.

Hunter's mass reminded me of a priest the local church used to have. He said Packers' mass every week during football season.

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DianeL
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Post by DianeL » Fri November 16th, 2012, 11:10 pm

I wonder whether it's related to fuffery, too - "What's all this fuffery?" - :)
"To be the queen, she agreed to be the widow!"

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princess garnet
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Post by princess garnet » Sat November 17th, 2012, 4:25 pm

[quote=""LoveHistory""]
Hunter's mass reminded me of a priest the local church used to have. He said Packers' mass every week during football season.[/quote]
When I was in college, for the Super Bowl, the Sunday evening Mass would be in late morning instead of the 8 pm slot. (We had a small collegiate church on campus)

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Thu December 6th, 2012, 9:18 pm

buzz the bottle - This is a common expression at wine parties when the bottle does not contain sufficient [wine] to fill all the glasses. It means "equally divide what is left." The word "buzz" meant anciently "to empty." Perhaps the word "booze" comes from the same root. ~ Henry Reddall's Fact, Fancy and Fable, 1889

bludget - A female thief who decoys her victims into alley-ways or other dark places for the purpose of robbing them. ~ George Matsell's Vocabulum; or, The Rogue's Lexicon, 1859

incunabula - Books printed during the early period of the art, generally confined to those printed before the year 1500. ~ Joseph Worcester's Dictionary of the English Language, 1881

by trading - To live by trading, by prostitution. ~ R. E. G. Cole's Words Used in South-West Lincolnshire, 1886

moon-eyed - Having eyes affected by the moon. ~ Robert Hunter's Encyclopedic Dictionary, 1894

When folks are moon-eyed, they have to gleg at you (look askance) out of the corner of the eye. ~ R. E. G. Cole's Words Used in South-West Lincolnshire, 1886

lant - To put urine into [ale] to make it strong. ~ John Ray's Words Not Generally Used, 1691 GROSS!!!

bibliomaniac - One affected by bibliomania, book-madness, or the rage for possession; from Greek biblion, book, and mania, madness. ~ James Donald's Etymological Dictionary of the English Language, 1877

full chisel - At full speed; a modern New England vulgarism. ~ John Bartlett's Dictionary of Americanisms, 1849

With the greatest violence or impetuosity. ~ John Farmer's Slang and Its Analogues, 1890-1904

Full drive, rapid driving; full butt and full smack are synonymous. ~ Alfred Elwyn's Glossary of Supposed Americanisms, 1859

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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Fri December 7th, 2012, 2:34 am

I would imagine lanting evolved to hide the fact that the ale had been watered down by a greedy landlord/owner.

I think bludget should be bludgette, in the French style. Clearly related to bludgeon, as her victims would be most likely be bludgeoned.

Bibliomaniac. We don't have any of those here, do we? ;)

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Mon December 10th, 2012, 1:38 pm

mifflin - Useless. "I'm as mifflin as a newborn babe," I'm as useless as a baby. ~ Appleton Morgan's Study in the Warwickshire Dialect, 1900

croozle - To make a low, whispering noise, like an infant just on the point of waking. ~ Walter Skeat's Glossary of Devonshire Words, 1896

chowp - To prattle, chatter. Chowper, a prattler, a "little chowper." Said of a child. ~ Thomas Darlington's Folk-Speech of South Cheshire, 1887

writing-machine - Typewriter. ~ William Whitney's Century Dictionary, 1889

about East - In a proper manner. This curious slang expression originated in the West among New Englanders emigrated from the East. With them, naturally, all that is done in their native land is right, and hence, what they admire they simply call about East. Sylva Clapin's Dictionary of Americanisms, 1902

nadgers - An expression used when a coin, in tossing, falls upon its edge - neither head nor tail up. ~ R. Pearse Chope's Dialect of Hartland, Devonshire, 1891

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Tue December 11th, 2012, 1:46 pm

chamade - A signal by beat of drum or sound of trumpet inviting to a parley. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1893

opschelplooper - One who sponges upon his friends for his meals. From Dutch opscheppen, to serve up, and looper, a runner. ~ Charles Pettman's Africanderisms: A Glossary of South African Colloquial Words and Phrases, 1913

cit - An inhabitant of a city, in an ill sense. Contracted fromcitizen. ~ Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

lashigillavery - Plenty of meat and drink; probably from lavish. ~ John Brockett's Glossary of North Country Words, 1825

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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Tue December 11th, 2012, 10:28 pm

I see cit a lot in regency novels. Opschelplooper is a good one. I won't be using it, as I'll never remember the spelling, but I can think of some of those characters in various stories.

Chamade is interesting.

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DianeL
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Post by DianeL » Tue December 11th, 2012, 11:34 pm

... anyone else thinking of the publisher Houghton Mifflin ... ? Heh.
"To be the queen, she agreed to be the widow!"

***

The pre-modern world was willing to attribute charisma to women well before it was willing to attribute sustained rationality to them.
---Medieval Kingship, Henry A. Myers

***

http://dianelmajor.blogspot.com/
I'm a Twit: @DianeLMajor

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Thu December 13th, 2012, 3:44 pm

bluffer - A host, innkeeper, or victualler; to look bluff, to look big, or like bull-beef. Rum-bluffer, a jolly host, innkeeper or victualler. ~ B. E.'s Dictionary of the Canting Crew, 1699

free list - A list kept by theatrical managers of "men about town" - barristers, medical men, and others - who can be relied upon to "dress the house" at short notice when business is bad, and so to give it an air of prosperity . . . They render management a service, but being able to pay for seats at all times they are apt to be obnoxious in their demands when the entertainment really draws good houses. Hence the notice, "Free list entirely suspended," at such times. ~ Trench Johnson's Phrases and Names: Their Origins and Meanings, 1906

after-wit - Later knowledge; the knowledge of riper years or later times; after-witted, wise when too late. Recognition of former folly; practical repentance; a "coming to one's senses." ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1888

big jump - The cowman's reference to death. When one died, he was said to have taken the big jump. A good many cowmen were "weighted down with their boots." ~ Ramon Adams's Western Words: A Dictionary of the Range, Cow Camp, and Trail, 1944

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