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Words We Don't Use

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Tue January 24th, 2012, 2:09 pm

dunch - Deaf... I have no doubt that dunch is Anglo-Saxon... It ought not to be forgotten that many words are... being arrested by our etymologists in the present advancing age of investigation. ~ James Jenning's Dialect of Somersetshire, 1869


To answer your question, Kveto, no I don't.

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Wed January 25th, 2012, 2:26 pm

dowsabell - A common name in sixteenth-century powetry for a sweetheart, especially for an unsophisticated country girl. ~ Ebenezer Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1898

The name means "sweet and beautiful," from French douce et belle. ~ John Phin's Shakespeare Cyclopœdia and New Glossary, 1902

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fljustice
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Post by fljustice » Wed January 25th, 2012, 4:21 pm

[quote=""Kveto from Prague""]that reminds me. Does anybody know another word for thesaurus?[/quote]

Made me laugh!
Faith L. Justice, Author Website
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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Thu January 26th, 2012, 1:55 pm

wamble - To rumble, as when the intestines are distented with wind; generally spoken of the stomach. ~ William Toone's Etymological Dictionary of Obsolete Words, 1832

To turn and twist the body, roll or wriggle about, roll over and over; also with about, over, [and] through. To roll about in walking; to go with an unsteady gait. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1928

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Thu January 26th, 2012, 4:18 pm

I like wamble, I'll remember that next time my stomach rumbles when it's quiet in the office!
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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Thu January 26th, 2012, 4:19 pm

Yeah I think wamble is something most everyone experiences. :)

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TiciaRoma
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Post by TiciaRoma » Thu January 26th, 2012, 7:41 pm

Perhaps related to wame?

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Mon January 30th, 2012, 1:44 pm

gizzen - To grin audibly. ~ C. Clough Robinson's Dialect of Mid-Yorkshire, 1876

Gizzum - the mouth. ~ Thomas Darlington's Folk-Speech of South Cheshire, 1887

stale drunk - a man is said to be stale drunk when he has been drunk overnight and has doctored himself with stimulants a little too much in the morning [and] tried too many of the "hairs of the dog that bit him." If this state of things is long continued, it is often called "same old drunk." ~ John Hotten's Slang Dictionary, 1887

anabrochismus - An operation for removing the eyelashes by means of a hair knotted around them. ~ Robley Dunglison's Dictionary of Medical Science, 1844
Last edited by Rowan on Mon January 30th, 2012, 2:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Mon January 30th, 2012, 2:41 pm

anabrochismus - An operation for removing the eyelashes by means of a hair knotted around them. ~ Robley Dunglison's Dictionary of Medical Science, 1844[/QUOTE]

Sounds painful :eek: :eek:
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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Mon January 30th, 2012, 2:46 pm

I can't imagine why you'd need or even want all of your eyelashes plucked out. *rubs eyes*

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