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Words We Don't Use

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Vanessa
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Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Post by Vanessa » Wed September 26th, 2012, 5:21 pm

I still use the word 'caboodle'! :rolleyes: :o :D
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

annis
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Post by annis » Thu September 27th, 2012, 4:28 am

Posted by Vanessa
I still use the word 'caboodle'!
Me too- as in "kit and caboodle" aka "the whole kit and caboodle" - still a common saying around here!

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Madeleine
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Currently reading: "Fear on the Phantom Special" by Edward Marston
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Post by Madeleine » Thu September 27th, 2012, 12:59 pm

And me, it's still in pretty common usage; I've seen it used in modern novels too.
Currently reading: "Fear on the Phantom Special" by Edward Marston.

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DianeL
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Post by DianeL » Mon October 1st, 2012, 11:20 pm

Caboodle was also used by this brand for a popular line of makeup cases inspired by the theater habit of using tackle or small toolboxes to organize and carry makeup.
"To be the queen, she agreed to be the widow!"

***

The pre-modern world was willing to attribute charisma to women well before it was willing to attribute sustained rationality to them.
---Medieval Kingship, Henry A. Myers

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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Wed October 3rd, 2012, 4:05 pm

I like hebetude and swacker. May use Cornish hug sometime.

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Alisha Marie Klapheke
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Post by Alisha Marie Klapheke » Sat October 6th, 2012, 1:49 pm

[quote=""DianeL""]Caboodle was also used by this brand for a popular line of makeup cases inspired by the theater habit of using tackle or small toolboxes to organize and carry makeup.[/quote]

My younger sister was obsessed with Caboodles! I never knew its origin. Ha!

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Rowan
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Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
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Post by Rowan » Mon October 8th, 2012, 3:25 am

My last Caboodle was stolen from my Dad's van at Christmas and my class ring was in it. I no longer have my high school class ring. :( :( :(

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DianeL
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Post by DianeL » Mon October 8th, 2012, 11:51 pm

Aww, Rowan - that stinks! I lost mine after a car accident on 495 outside of DC. I was in college, coming home with a friend, and we got everything out of the back of the car before it went to be junked ... except, somehow, my class ring. I often think of its fate, salvaged or cubed and melted down, made into a "new" car itself now probably long since gone (this happened in 1990), hopefully a couple of grams of ultrium on an endless recycling journey through the automotive industry ... :D
"To be the queen, she agreed to be the widow!"

***

The pre-modern world was willing to attribute charisma to women well before it was willing to attribute sustained rationality to them.
---Medieval Kingship, Henry A. Myers

***

http://dianelmajor.blogspot.com/
I'm a Twit: @DianeLMajor

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Rowan
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Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
Location: New Orleans
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Post by Rowan » Wed October 10th, 2012, 6:34 pm

stattis - An assemblage for the hiring of farm and domestic servants . . . regarded by the Sheffield people as one of the most important events of the year. ~ Sidney Addy's Sheffield Glossary of Words, 1888

[At hiring fairs] carters fasten to their hats a piece of whipcord, shepherds a lock of wool, grooms a piece of sponge, etc. ~ Ebenezer Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1898

beevers - A portion of bread and allowance of beer laid out in Winchester School Hall at beever-time. From French boire, Old French boivre [to drink]. From Italian bevere, whence our beverage. Beever-time, a quarter of an hour's relaxation allowed to the Winchester [School] boys in the middle of afternoon school in summer to give them an opportunity of disposing of beevers. ~ William Cope's Glossary of Hampsire Words and Phrases, 1883

bibliothecary - Keeper of a library. ~ Elisha Cole's English Dictionary, 1713

Bibliotaphe, one who shuts up his books as if in a sepulcher; from Greek biblion, a book, and taphos, a tomb. ~ Robert Hunter's Encyclopaedic Dictionary, 1895


niscal - The smallest of a brood. Formed like the old word nescook, from the Anglo-Saxon nesc . . . tender, delicate . . . Other derivatives of this word have a similar sense in other provincial dialects. Grose['s Provincial Glossary] has "Nestling, the smallest bird of the nest or clutch; called also the nestlecock and nestlebub." . . . In Devonshire . . . nestledraft is "the last and weakest child of the family" . . . The least pig of the litter is called a cadma or a whinnock in the southern counties and an anthony pig in Kent. ~ G. C. Lewis's Glossary of . . . Words Used in Herefordshire, 1839

flexanimous - Having power to change the disposition of the mind. ~ Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

king's stroke - The touch of the royal hand for kingsevil. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1901

This belief in the supernatural authority of monarchs . . . resulted from the conviction that they could trace their pedigrees back to the deities themselves. ~ Charles Hardwick's Traditions, Superstitions and Folklore, 1872

God's acre - A churchyard; "acre" in the sense of enclosed land. ~ Albert Hyamson's Dictionary of English Phrases, 1922

Properly, God's seed-field, in which the bodies of the departed are sown (1 Corinthians:15) in hope of the resurrection. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1901

jokesmith - A professional joker; one who manufactures jokes. ~ Daniel Lyon's Dictionary of the English Language, 1897

buggarty - Timid, skittish; of horses. ~ Thomas Darlington's Folk-Speech of South Cheshire, 1887

hung on wires - An American expression for one suffering from "nerves" - a nervous or fidgety person. ~ Trench Johnson's Phrases and Names: Their Origins and Meanings, 1906

draw-gloves - A sort of game . . . between lovers. ~ Robert Nares's Glossary of the Works of English Authors, 1859

brune - A dark girl or woman. The same as brunette, though properly a brune should be darker than a brunette. From French brun, brown. ~ C. A. M. Fennell's Stanford Dictionary of Anglicised Words and Phrases, 1892

inauration - The act [of] covering with gold. From Latin aurum, gold. ~ John Boag's Imperial Lexicon of the English Language, c. 1850

Among chymists, a rich cordial liquor with pieces of gold leaf in it. ~ Nathaniel Bailey's Etymological English Dictionary, 1749


* Note the highlighted entry this time is just a favourite of mine that stood out to me. :)

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DianeL
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Post by DianeL » Wed October 10th, 2012, 10:52 pm

Okay, loving flexanimous.
"To be the queen, she agreed to be the widow!"

***

The pre-modern world was willing to attribute charisma to women well before it was willing to attribute sustained rationality to them.
---Medieval Kingship, Henry A. Myers

***

http://dianelmajor.blogspot.com/
I'm a Twit: @DianeLMajor

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