Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Words We Don't Use

annis
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4585
Joined: August 2008

Post by annis » Mon September 10th, 2012, 8:18 pm

Reading about someone described as being in an brown study is not that rare, though you're more likely to come across the term in literature rather than in conversation.

User avatar
LoveHistory
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3751
Joined: September 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Contact:

Post by LoveHistory » Tue September 11th, 2012, 4:47 pm

I quite like amaritude. I shall endeavor to use it in a story.

User avatar
Rowan
Bibliophile
Posts: 1462
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
Location: New Orleans
Contact:

Post by Rowan » Tue September 11th, 2012, 4:58 pm

If brun means 'sad or melancholy', what does that say about brunettes? Are we all a sad, depressed lot? :p

User avatar
LoveHistory
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3751
Joined: September 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Contact:

Post by LoveHistory » Wed September 12th, 2012, 3:06 pm

I thought brun meant brown. I could see how there would be a connotation of sadness when used in another way though. Brown is not a color associated with cheerfulness. For the record I am a brunette and naturally melancholy. :D

User avatar
Rowan
Bibliophile
Posts: 1462
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
Location: New Orleans
Contact:

Post by Rowan » Wed September 12th, 2012, 3:07 pm

No, you're funny. :p

User avatar
LoveHistory
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3751
Joined: September 2008
Location: Wisconsin, USA
Contact:

Post by LoveHistory » Wed September 12th, 2012, 8:20 pm

I'm both melancholy and funny. I multi-task. ;)

User avatar
DianeL
Bibliophile
Posts: 1029
Joined: May 2011
Location: Midatlantic east coast, United States
Contact:

Post by DianeL » Wed September 12th, 2012, 11:33 pm

I've been acquainted with brown study most of my life, but don't recall ever seeing it rendered as a single word.

Bleezed is a new one - I've always liked squiffed and spifflicated for this state, but bleezed is nice!
"To be the queen, she agreed to be the widow!"

***

The pre-modern world was willing to attribute charisma to women well before it was willing to attribute sustained rationality to them.
---Medieval Kingship, Henry A. Myers

***

http://dianelmajor.blogspot.com/
I'm a Twit: @DianeLMajor

User avatar
Rowan
Bibliophile
Posts: 1462
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
Location: New Orleans
Contact:

Post by Rowan » Tue September 25th, 2012, 4:05 pm

Cornish hug - The Cornish men were famous wrestlers, and tried to throttle their antagonists with a particular lock called the Cornish hug. ~ Henry Reddall's Fact, Fancy, and Fable, 1889

Figuratively, a treacherous "throw," or injury, done by a pretended friend. ~ Robert Hunter's Encyclopaedic Dictionary, 1895

squareman - A carpenter, stone-cutter, or other workman who regularly uses a square for adjusting or testing his work; [late 1700s-1800s] ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1919

encrampish - To cramp, hamper; after words like impoverish. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1901

boutefeu - Literally "to set fire." An incendiary, firebrand, agitator; from French. ~ C. A. M. Fennell's Stanford Dictionary of Anglicised Words and Phrases, 1892

swacker - Something huge; a bulky and robust person. Figuratively, a great lie. ~ Rev. Robert Forby's Vocabulary of East Anglia, 1830

cold coffee - Misfortune; sometimes varied to "cold gruel." Sea [slang]. ~ John Hotten's Slang Dictionary, 1887

A hoax, a trumpery affair; Oxford University. . . An unpleasant return or snub for a proffered kindness. ~ John Farmer's Slang and Its Analogues, 1891

mought - This old [past tense] of "may," now obsolete in England, has been retained in the South, and is very common in all parts of the Union. Until of late years, its use was mainly confined to . . . people in the interior of the New England states. Latterly, however, a spirit of change appears to have revived the popularity of this form. In North Carolina, "perhaps" is almost invariably rendered "it mought be." ~ John Farmer's Americanisms Old and New, 1889

Frequently heard in the South, where the negroes use it almost exclusively. Derived from the ancient verb mowe - the ancestor of may and corresponding to the German mochte - it was once correct. ~ M. Schele de Vere's Americanisms, 1872

byblow - An illegitimate child. ~ John Hotten's Slang Dictionary, 1887

nose-swelling - To make a person's nose swell, to make him jealous of a rival; [found in John Ray's 1678 collection of proverbs]. ~ James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

To offer or pretend to do kindnesses to one, and then pass him by and do it to another. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1908

hebetude - Dullness; bluntness; obtuseness; want of discernment. Hebetate, to dull, to blunt; to stupify. "The eye is hebetated." ~ Daniel Fenning's Royal English Dictionary, 1775

Hebetudinous, inclined to hebetude. Hence hebetudinosity, dullness, obtuseness. Hebetize, to make dull. [From] hebete, dull, stupid, obtuse. Adapted from Latin hebes, hebet, blunt, dull. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1901

livercolour - Dark red. ~ Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

leatherdick - A leathern pinafore such as is used by shoemakers. The acquisition of one used to be a great object of ambition with Almondbury lads. They regarded it as a kind of toga virilis. ~ Alfred Easther's Dialect of Almondbury and Huddersfield, 1883

caboodle - A noisy, rowdy place or crowd. ~ John Wilkinson's Leed's Dialect Glossary and Lore, 1924

The whole caboodle, the whole lot; supposed to be a corruption of the phrase kit and caboodle. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1893

User avatar
Madeleine
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 5706
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: "Longstone" by L J Ross
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Post by Madeleine » Wed September 26th, 2012, 4:13 pm

I've come across "byblow", I'm sure it was in one of Catherine Cookson's Mallen books. The time period is correct, I think, according to the source you give.
Currently reading: "Longstone" by L J Ross

User avatar
Rowan
Bibliophile
Posts: 1462
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
Location: New Orleans
Contact:

Post by Rowan » Wed September 26th, 2012, 4:17 pm

Yes byblow is one I've seen countless times. :) Livercolour is familiar as well.

Post Reply

Return to “Chat”