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Words We Don't Use

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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Fri August 10th, 2012, 3:00 am

Wish I were cerulifick.

I surmise that stable came from stabulation then.

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DianeL
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Post by DianeL » Fri August 10th, 2012, 8:59 pm

I would have thought stabulation came from stable (well, or that both forms have a shared root).

Dew-drink is charmingly evocative. (Not sure about dew-droppings, though!)
"To be the queen, she agreed to be the widow!"

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Thu August 16th, 2012, 1:42 pm

still hunting - Walking noiselessly through woods . . . and searching for game. ~ James Bartlett's Dictionary of Americanisms, 1884

tarantismus - An epidemic dancing mania prevalent in Italy in the 16th and 17th centuries, originating in an exagerated dread of . . . the bite of a tarantula . . . the sufferer being attacked with extreme somnolency [drowsiness] which could only be overcome by music and dancing. ~ Robert Hunter's Encyclopaedic Dictionary, 1894

few broth - I cannot help observing one application of the word few, peculiar to the northern counties, for which there seems to be no justifiable reason. When speaking of broth, the common people always say, "Will you have a few broth?" and in commending the broth will add, "They are very good." This is also an appropriation so rigidly confined to broth that they do not say a few ale, a few punch, nor a few milk, a few fermenty, nor a few of any other liquid. I would rather suppose that they hereby mean, elliptically, a few spoonfuls of broth, for broth cannot be considered as one of those hermaphroditical words which are both singular and plural, such as sheep and deer. ~ Samuel Pegge's Anecdotes of the English Language, 1803

Englifier - One who renders a work into English; a translator. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1901

myropolist - One who sells unguents. ~ Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

cock on hoop - At the height of mirth and jollity, the cock, or spigot, being [removed and] aid on the hoop, and the barrel of ale stumed, as they say in Staffordshire; that is, drunk out without intermission. ~ Elisha Cole's English Dictionary, 1713

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DianeL
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Post by DianeL » Thu August 16th, 2012, 11:04 pm

You are scaring me - I was reading about the dancing mania and Tarantella less than two hours ago, and just last night I was streaming up some entertaining David Starkey in which he was explicating the several meanings of "cock" in terms of a pun on its spigot meaning and the one that makes teenagers chortle.
"To be the queen, she agreed to be the widow!"

***

The pre-modern world was willing to attribute charisma to women well before it was willing to attribute sustained rationality to them.
---Medieval Kingship, Henry A. Myers

***

http://dianelmajor.blogspot.com/
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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Tue September 4th, 2012, 3:36 pm

This is going to be a long list owing to the fact that we had an unwelcome visitor here in New Orleans last week. :(

harringay - Harringay expresses a neighbourhood or district abounding in hares. ~ Trench Johnson's Phrase and Names: Their Origins and Meanings, 1906

In modern times, "buying the rabbit" means asking or looking for trouble or doing something that will inevitably earn a rebuff. The phrase owes its origin to the fact that one of the old-fashioned meanings of the word rabbit is curse or bother. ~ J.B. Lippincott's Lost Beauties of the English Language, 1874

back and edge - Completely, entirely; the back and edge being nearly the whole of some instruments. ~ Robert Nare's Glossary of the Works of English Authors, 1859

ground bridge - The "courduroy road" on the bottom of a stream to facilitate fording. ~ Gilbert Tucker's American English, 1921

infangthef - Infangthef is compounded of three Saxon words - the preposition in, fang or fong, to take or catch, and thef. It signifies a privilege or liberty granted unto lords of certain manors to judge any thief taken within their fee [c. 1020]. ~ John Cowell's Interpreter, Containing the Genuine Signification of Such Obscure Words and Terms Used . . . in the Lawes of This Realm, 1607

summerfolds - Summer freckles. ~ J. Drummond Robertson's Glossary of Dialect and Archaic Words Used in the County of Gloucester, 1890

attitudinize - To strike an "attitude"; to pose. ~ Gilbert Tucker's American English, 1921

downhaggered - Disconsolate. ~ Edward Slow's Words Used by the Peasantry in the Neighbourhood of Salisbury, c. 1900

jampher - A male jilt; an idler; a scoffer. From jamph, to make a game of; to mock, jeer, sneer; to act the part of a male jilt; to trifle, spend time idly, lounge. ~ Alexander Warrack's Scots Dialect Dictionary, 1808

Jamph, to tire, to fatigue. It is frequently used to denote the fatigue caused by continued motion of a shaking kind, as that of riding, especially if the horse be hard in the seat. ~ John Jamieson's Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language, 1808

Jamphing, making false pretenses of courtship, applied to a male. ~ Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1898-1905

bewivvered - Lost to one's self; bewildered; confounded; bewrayed; Exmoor. ~ Francis Grose's Provincial Glossary, 1811

autum - A church. Autum-bawler, a parson. Autumed, married. Autum-cove, a married man. Autum-cockler, a married woman. ~ George Matsell's Vocabulum; or. The Rogue's Lexicon, 1859

Autem-divers, pickpockets who practise in churches; also church-wardens and overseers of the poor. Autem-mort, a married woman. ~ Francis Grose's Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue, 1796

amerciament - In law, a fine imposed on an offender, against the king or other lord, who is convicted and therefore stands at the mercy of either. From amerce. ~ Daniel Fenning's Royal English Dictionary, 1775

The infliction of a penalty left to the "mercy" of the inflicter. Refashioned from amercement. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1888

backgone - Having declined in health. ~ Michael Traynor's English Dialect of Donegal, 1953

Sickly, pining away; usually applied to a so-called "changeling." Ireland. ~ Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1896-1905

blackberry baby - An illegitimate child; also blackberry patch baby; Missouri, Arkansas; 1907. ~ Harold Wentworth's American Dialect Dictionary, 1944

two strings to one's bow - The possession of two things [by which bets are hedged] as in the case of a girl who encourages two suitors, or a man who works at two businesses. ~ J.B. Lippincott's Everyday Phrases Explained, 1913

nocent - Guilty; the opposite of innocent; from Latin nocens. ~ William Toone's Etymological Dictionary of Obsolete Terms, 1832

knight of the grammar - A schoolmaster. ~ Albert Hyamson's Dictionary of English Phrases, 1922

Grammaticaster, a pedantic, trifling grammarian. From Latin grammaticus. ~ C.A.M. Fennell's Stanford Dictionary of Anglicised Words and Phrases, 1892

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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Tue September 4th, 2012, 4:51 pm

So much to like in that post! I'm particularly fond of jampher, nocent, and knight of the grammar. Bewivvered is quite nice as well.

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Wed September 5th, 2012, 8:50 am

I like downhaggerd and bewivvered - must remember those!

There's a London borough called Haringey, although I doubt there are any hares there now!
Currently reading: The Warrior's Princess by Barbara Erskine & "A Noel Killing" by M L Longworth

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Mon September 10th, 2012, 2:14 pm

wangery - Soft and flabby. . . This is the regular word used by butchers to express the condition of meat which will not get solid, a very common fault in warm weather, or if the animal was out of condition when slaughtered. ~ Henry Sweet's History of English Sounds, 1876

Flaccid, soft; generally used of meat; Berkshire. Languid, limp, tired; Somerset. Tough; northwest Devonshire. [Related to] wang, to bend; to yield under a weight, as a plank when walked on; West Somerset. Hence wanged, exhausted, wearied, drowned. ~ Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1898-1905

brownstudy - Gloomy meditation. ~ Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

Absence of mind; apparent though, but real vacuity. The corresponding French expression explains it - sombre réverie. Sombre and brun both mean sad, melancholy, gloomy, dull. ~ Ebenezer Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1898

Serious reverie; thoughtful absent-mindedness. ~ Noah Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language, 1828

Very common, even in educated society, but hardly admissible in writing. It is derived . . . from "brow study" [and] Old German braun, or aug-braun, an eyebrow. ~ John Hotten's Slang Dictionary, 1887

bleezed - Signifies the state of one on whom intoxicating liquor begins to operate. It especially denotes the change produced in the expression of the countenance. ~ John Jamieson's Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language, 1808

gamp - Bulging (of an umbrella); after Sarah Gamp, a nurse in Dicken's Martin Chuzzlewit, represented as always carrying a large umbrella. ~ Robert Hunter's Encyclopaedic Dictionary, 1895

amaritude - Bitterness. ~ John Boag's Imperial Lexicon of the English Language, c. 1850

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fljustice
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Post by fljustice » Mon September 10th, 2012, 2:57 pm

I've seen "brownstudy" used more than once in my reading, but not recently. Love "bleezed" and "amaritude."
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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Mon September 10th, 2012, 2:58 pm

I can't say I've ever seen any of these words used. Maybe I'm just not paying close enough attention.

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