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Words We Don't Use

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DianeL
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Post by DianeL » Tue April 10th, 2012, 11:27 pm

Triskadekaphobia isn't really out of use, is it? With another Friday the 13th on the way this very week, I expect it's getting its usual fluff journalism mileage ...
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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Thu April 12th, 2012, 12:46 pm

You are right Diane, that word is still very much in use.

medicinal days - The sixth, eighth, tenth, twelfth, sixteenth, eighteenth, etc. days of a disease, so called because, according to Hippocrates, no crisis occurs on these days, and medicine may be safely administered. ~ Ebenezer Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1898

medicinal hour, medicinal month, times when the administration of medicine was deemed proper. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1908

crotch-trolling - A method of . . . angling for pike, used in the broads and rivers in Norfolk. The fisherman has no rod, but has the usual reel and, by the help of a crotch-stick, throws his bait a considerable distance from him into the water, and then draws it gently towards him. It is much practised by poachers, as there is no rod or pole to betray their intention. ~ Rev. Robert Forby's Vocabulary of East Anglia, 1830

Piscarie . . . signifieth in our common lawe a libertie of fishing in another man's waters. ~ John Cowell's Interpreter of Signification of Words, 1607

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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Thu April 12th, 2012, 6:35 pm

I'd imagine that using the term crotch-trolling these days would have interesting repercussions.

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Thu April 12th, 2012, 6:37 pm

[quote=""LoveHistory""]I'd imagine that using the term crotch-trolling these days would have interesting repercussions.[/quote]

Ya think? :D :D :D

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Fri April 13th, 2012, 11:18 am

Yes I was thinking it could be taken two ways!
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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Tue April 24th, 2012, 4:39 pm

anparsy - Boys, in repeating their alphabet, would say ". . . X, Y, Z, anparsy." They did not know what it meant, but pointed in their spelling books to the character [&], also termed parsy-and. ~ M.C.F. Morris' Yorkshire Folk-Talk, 1892

Anpasty, another name for ampersand. It means and past y. ~ Rev. Robert Forby's Vocabulary of East Anglia, 1830

catchpoule - Literally, "chase-fowl," one who hunts or chases fowl. A tax-gatherer, an exactor of taxes or imposts [c. 1050-1650] . . . Since the 16th century, at least, a word of contempt. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1893

pantofles - Slippers; to be upon one's pantofles, to stand upon one's dignity. ~ A.V. Judges's Elizabethan Underworld, 1930

Welsh ambassador - The cuckoo. [John] Logan [1748-1788], in his poem To the Cuckoo, calls it the "messenger of spring" . . . Welsh ambassador means that the bird announces the migration of Welsh labourers into England for summer employment. ~ Ebenezer Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, 1898

If, when you hear the cuckoo for the first time, you are standing on grass or any green leaves, you will certainly live to hear the bird next season. But if you are standing on a roadway or the earth, or even upon stone, you will not live to hear the cuckoo when it comes next. ~ Marie Trevelyan's Folk-Lore and Folk-Stories of Wales, 1909

quisby - To say that a man is without money, or in poverty, some persons remark that he is . . . quisby, done up. ~ Charles Dickens's Household Words, 1853

An idler; doing quisby, not working; queer, not right; bankrupt. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1853

cross-reading - A reading across the page instead of down the oclumn of a newspaper, etc. producing a ludicrous connexion of subjects. Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1853

superannuate - To esteem, reckon, or admit a person into the number of those whose age entitles them to be eased in some service . . . upon account of their great age and natural (at least supposed) inability. ~ Thomas Dyche's New General English Dictionary, 1740

Superannuated, obsolete customs or words, such as are . . . out of use. ~ B. E.'s Dictionary of the Canting Crew, 1699

circudrie - Arrogance, conceit; Anglo-Norman. ~ James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

overmirth - Insult. ~ Herbert Coleridge's Oldest Words in the English Language, 1863

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Post by annis » Tue April 24th, 2012, 6:35 pm

The word "superannuated" is still in common usage here - meaning something or someone past their use-by date.

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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Wed April 25th, 2012, 8:50 pm

Pantofle is also spelled pantoufle. The French word for slipper, or according to some sources a specific kind of slipper.

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Rowan
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Post by Rowan » Tue May 1st, 2012, 8:08 pm

gommacks - Tricks; mischief; foolery. From Gaelic guaineach, giddy, sportive, frolicking. ~ John Nall's Glossary of the Dialect of East Anglia, 1866

To cut up didoes, to play mischief. ~ Richard Thornton's American Glossary, 1912

rubbage - Rubbish. Whether the form here given, or rubbige, be the better, it is neither worth contesting, nor possible to ascertain. Both are Old English and used even by very eminent bishops . . . Mr. Todd has taken the pains to vindicate both from the charge of corruption, facetiously but unfortunately made by Mr. Pegge. If there be any corruption at all, it is rubbish itself. ~ Rev. Robert Forby's Vocabulary of East Anglia, 1830

From rub, as perhaps meaning, at first, dust made by rubbing. ~ Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

Provincial English; rubbrish was used in the exact sense of what we now usually call rubble, and the two words rubbish and rubble are closely connected. William Horman in his Vulgaria [1519] says that ". . . great rubbrysshe serveth to fyl up the myddell of the wall." ~ Walter Skeat's Etymological Dictionary of the English Language, 1879

lifelode - The leading of one's life; Middle English. ~ Ernest Weekley's English Language, 1929

Obsolete form of livelihood. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1908

nabble - To gnaw. A stronger word than nibble by change of vowel. Mice nibble and rats nabble our victuals. ~ Rev. Robert Forby's Vocabulary of East Anglia, 1830

To chatter; to gossip; to idle about; nabbler, a gossip, an argumentative captious person; Kent, Surrey, Sussex, and Hampshire. Hence nabble-trap, the mouth. ~ Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1898-1905

pythonic - Pretending to foretell future events; from pythoness, the female or priestess who gave oracular answers at Delphi. ~ John Boag's Imperial Lexicon of the English Language, c. 1850

warling - One who is despised or disliked; apparently formed arbitrarily to rhyme with darling. The resemblance to Scottish wirling ["a wretch; a dwarfish or puny creature"] seems to be accidental. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1908

A word of doubtful origin, occurring in the proverb, "Better be an old man's darling than a young man's warling." Perhaps coined fromwar, in imitation of darling, and meaning one often quarreled with. ~ Robert Hunter's Encyclopaedic Dictionary, 1894
Last edited by Rowan on Tue May 1st, 2012, 8:27 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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fljustice
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Post by fljustice » Wed May 2nd, 2012, 4:25 pm

Like the word nabble...quite descriptive.
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