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Words We Don't Use

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Rowan
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Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
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Post by Rowan » Tue April 3rd, 2012, 3:34 pm

quizzification - A hoax. ~ T. Lewis Davies's Supplementary English Glossary, 1881

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Rowan
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Posts: 1462
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
Location: New Orleans
Contact:

Post by Rowan » Wed April 4th, 2012, 3:29 pm

limotherapy - The treatment of disease by abstinence; from Greek limos, hunger. ~ Richard Hoblyn's Dictionary of Medicine, 1859

The "hunger cure." ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1908

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Alisha Marie Klapheke
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Location: Franklin, TN
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Post by Alisha Marie Klapheke » Wed April 4th, 2012, 3:31 pm

I should try limotherapy with regards to cheeseburgers and my family's history with heart problems!

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Posts: 3562
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favourite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Wed April 4th, 2012, 4:29 pm

40 pounds worth of limotherapy would cure my knees and ankles. :D

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Rowan
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Posts: 1462
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
Location: New Orleans
Contact:

Post by Rowan » Thu April 5th, 2012, 1:26 pm

You ladies are so funny. lol

Here's another word for those of us who are writers:

escritoir - A box with all implements necessary for writing. ~ Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

In early use, often one of a portable size; more recently, chiefly applied to a larger piece of furniture; a bureau or secretary. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1897

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Madeleine
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Currently reading: "Longstone" by L J Ross
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Post by Madeleine » Thu April 5th, 2012, 1:34 pm

[quote=""Rowan""]You ladies are so funny. lol

Here's another word for those of us who are writers:

escritoir - A box with all implements necessary for writing. ~ Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755

In early use, often one of a portable size; more recently, chiefly applied to a larger piece of furniture; a bureau or secretary. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1897[/quote]

They still use that word a lot, I think it's lovely as it really conjures up the image of a writer and all their tools. It does still apply more to antique, or reproduction, furniture - I'd love one of these if I had a study :)
Currently reading: "Longstone" by L J Ross

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DianeL
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Post by DianeL » Mon April 9th, 2012, 11:44 pm

Am I right in thinking there is also a variation with another e? Escritoire seems more familiar to me for some reason.
"To be the queen, she agreed to be the widow!"

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annis
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Post by annis » Tue April 10th, 2012, 7:51 am

Yep, it was originally a French word, and definitely has an "e" on the end - I've only ever seen it spelt "escritoire". Of course spelling was more variable in the past, though good ol' Dr Johnson had quite a bit to do with standardizing it :)
Last edited by annis on Tue April 10th, 2012, 7:56 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Rowan
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Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: I love history, but it's boring in school. Historical fiction brings it alive for me.
Preferred HF: Iron-Age Britain, Roman Britain, Medieval Britain
Location: New Orleans
Contact:

Post by Rowan » Tue April 10th, 2012, 2:52 pm

triskadekaphobia - Fear of the number thirteen. Also triskephobia. ~ Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1919

Easter-sermons - Sermons supposed to be suitable for delivery at Easter. Strange to tell, in the 16th century, these were replete with ludicrous stories and jests designed to provoke "Easter laughter." ~ Robert Hunter's Encyclopædic Dictionary, 1895

clanjamphry - A company of people, especially a disorderly or vulgar crowed; a mob, rabble; "Such a clamjamphry of theivin' drunken miscreants," from Jane Barlow's Lisconnel (1895). Rubbish; trumpery; odds and ends. Nonsensical talk. Scotland, Ireland, Northumberland. ~ Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1898-1905

The "whole clanjamphrey," the mob; the rabble. Scotland. ~ Albert Hyamson's Dictionary of English Phrases, 1922.

cruckle - To sink down. "He cruckled to the floor." ~ Ammon Wrigley's Lancashire Words and Sayings, 1940

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Madeleine
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Posts: 5706
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: "Longstone" by L J Ross
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Post by Madeleine » Tue April 10th, 2012, 3:23 pm

I love cruckle - I wonder if it's a mixture of crumple and buckle.
Currently reading: "Longstone" by L J Ross

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