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Ticia's 2012 Reading Log

Keep track of what you read in 2012. One thread per member, please.
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TiciaRoma
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Ticia's 2012 Reading Log

Post by TiciaRoma » Thu January 5th, 2012, 11:35 pm

January

M.C. Beaton
  1. Minerva: First Volume of the Six Sisters, 256 pp.
  2. The Taming of Annabelle, 196 pp.
  3. Deirdre and Desire, 192 pp.
  4. Daphne, 176 pp.


These are fairly short and"lite." I very much enjoy Beaton's Agatha Raisin and Hamish MacBeth books. These are not of the same calibre, but were diverting for a while. I doubt I'll continue the series.
Last edited by TiciaRoma on Tue March 6th, 2012, 12:28 am, edited 7 times in total.

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TiciaRoma
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Post by TiciaRoma » Fri January 6th, 2012, 2:21 am

Elizabeth Chadwick

5. The Scarlet Lion, 592 pp.


This wonderful book is Chadwick's second book about William Marshall that covers, roughly, his life from the death of Richard I until his death. Chadwick makes the era and the people come alive. I loved the story of his relationship with his wife Isabella. This is a re-read for me, but this time I listened to an audible.com version on a very long car trip. The narrator, Christopher Scott is marvelous. He lends a mild Irish accent to Isabella and her motherr which reminded me of her Irish roots. This book caused me to want to re-read Morgan Llywellan's Strongbow (about Isabella's father) and Chadwick's A Time of Singing (about the Duke and Duchess of Norfolk whose heir married The Marshall's oldest daughter).
Last edited by TiciaRoma on Tue March 6th, 2012, 12:12 am, edited 6 times in total.

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Fri January 6th, 2012, 9:47 am

The Scarlet Lion is a great book, however I think the King was Richard I!
Currently reading: "The Infirmary" by L J Ross

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TiciaRoma
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Post by TiciaRoma » Sat January 7th, 2012, 2:15 am

[quote=""Madeleine""]The Scarlet Lion is a great book, however I think the King was Richard I![/quote]

Ooh, quite right. :o

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TiciaRoma
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Post by TiciaRoma » Sat January 21st, 2012, 5:27 pm

Elizabeth Chadwick

6. In the Time of Singing, 528 pp.

I wanted to re-read this one after having recently finished The Scarlet Lion. Roger Bigod and Ida were contemporaries of William Marshall and I like seeing events through different eyes. I've enjoyed EC's books since I first encountered them in the late 90's, but I think she's getting better and better. Her descriptions are quite good and really give a sense of place and time. She pays attention to detail of dress and her characters are well developed. I especially liked Henry II in this one. Very believable.
Last edited by TiciaRoma on Tue March 6th, 2012, 12:13 am, edited 2 times in total.

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TiciaRoma
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Post by TiciaRoma » Wed January 25th, 2012, 8:31 pm

Bernard Cornwell

7. The Last Kingdom, 368 pp.

This is the first in his Saxon Chronicles series. It takes place beginning at the end of the 9th C when the Danes sought to complete their conquest of the independent Anglo Saxon kingdoms, especially King Alfred's Wessex. It was good to compare this with Joan Wolf's, The Edge of Light, which I read a month ago, about the same subject, but with a different perspective.
Last edited by TiciaRoma on Tue March 6th, 2012, 12:16 am, edited 2 times in total.

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TiciaRoma
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Post by TiciaRoma » Thu January 26th, 2012, 7:58 pm

Geraldine Brooks

8. March, 304 pp.

Loved this one. Louisa May Alcott's Little Women takes place at the beginning of the Civil War. Brooks gives us the story of Mr. March and his experiences during that year. She took just a few liberties with the facts, but grounded this book on Little Women and on extensive primary source material about Bronson Alcott, Louisa's father and the model for March. She did a nice job interweaving bits of the LW story that we know, explaining, for instance, why the family was so poor and why Aunt March was so crochety.
Last edited by TiciaRoma on Tue March 6th, 2012, 12:18 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Post by TiciaRoma » Sat January 28th, 2012, 3:07 am

Bernard Cornwell

9. Pale Horseman. 337 pp.

Continuation of the Saxon Chronicles. Alfred has taken refuge in a swampy part of Wessex, but against great odds, calls forth the fyrd and defeats the Danes. We see his vision for a unified England.
Last edited by TiciaRoma on Tue March 6th, 2012, 12:16 am, edited 1 time in total.

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TiciaRoma
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Post by TiciaRoma » Mon January 30th, 2012, 9:00 pm

Joan Szechtman

10. Loyalty Binds Me, 216 pp.

A fun alternate HF--Richard III didn't die on Bosworth Field. Rather he was transported to the present. His problems aren't over, though. The FBI and MI5 have gotten wind of his true identity and want to charge him with the murder of his nephews and/or treason. Moreover, they want the technology, invented by his new wife, which enabled his time transfer.

Shades of Josephine Tey and Connie Willis. A fun read.

The kindle edition is still free on amazon as of this writing.
Last edited by TiciaRoma on Tue March 6th, 2012, 12:20 am, edited 1 time in total.

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TiciaRoma
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Post by TiciaRoma » Thu February 2nd, 2012, 1:01 pm

FEBRUARY

Bernard Cornwell

11. Lords of the North, 368 pp.

This is the third book in Cornwell's Saxon Chronicles. The Danish takeover of Wessex has been thwarted, but now the Saxons and the Danes, Christians and pagans, start to forge a way to co-exist in the land. Cornwell focuses on his fictional hero, Uthred, and weaves his tale around kings and warriors known only as names in ancient chronicles.
Last edited by TiciaRoma on Tue March 6th, 2012, 12:17 am, edited 1 time in total.

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