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Which Bruce Trilogy?

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Manda Scott
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Bruce Trilogy: Rob Low Kingdom Series

Post by Manda Scott » Fri July 27th, 2012, 4:20 pm

Isn't it amazing how differently we read things? I read Rob Low's 'The Lion Wakes' and thought it was some of the best writing I'd read, easily comparable with Hilary Mantel's 'Wolf Hall' and with the added bonus that, as a Scot, it showed me what felt like a genuine history of my nation.

It's not that I don't like Nigel Tranter - I grew up reading him; my Dad was an ardent Scots nationalist and had ever NT book on his shelves - but the books haven't aged well to my mind while Rob's was fresh and sharp and wonderful - his love scene in that book is the best I have ever read anywhere, period...

manda
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annis
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Post by annis » Sat July 28th, 2012, 12:13 am

I loved Lion Wakes. Not long ago I read the sequel, Lion at Bay, and thought it even better, though I wouldn't have supposed that possible. Rob has really hit a nice balance here for readers not so familiar with Scottish history and dialect, without losing the distinctive Scottish voice which made Lion Wakes such a treat. There's plenty more bloody violence and treachery, great action and suspense, yet ongoing character development as familar friends and foes grow older and wearier of the endless struggle adds depth and pyschological understanding to the mix. Brilliant.
Last edited by annis on Sat July 28th, 2012, 7:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

rebecca
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Post by rebecca » Sat July 28th, 2012, 3:00 am

[quote=""annis""]I loved Lion Wakes. Not long ago I read the sequel, Lion at Bay, and thought it even better, though I wouldn't have supposed that possible. Rob has really hit a nice balance here for readers not so familiar with Scottish history and dialect, without losing the distinctive Scottish voice which made Lion Wakes such a treat. There's plenty more bloody violence and treachery, great action and suspense, yet ongoing character development as familar friends and foes come to terms with growing older and weary of the endless struggle adds depth and pyschological understanding to the mix. Brilliant.[/quote]

I have both books but haven't read them yet. My grandfather was born in Scotland and till the day he died I never understood a word he said :eek: except when he ended his sentences with 'an wot ye thunk of tat wee lassie?' I would love to visit Scotland one day *sigh*. But I will have to start reading the books I have on Bruce....I also have Youngs first book and will buy the second in her trilogy in a few weeks.

I did try & read Tranter's Wallace book but I couldn't finish it.

Bec :)

Carla
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Post by Carla » Mon August 6th, 2012, 8:46 pm

I'd second the recommendations of Robert Low's Lion Wakes (and on current showing also Lion At Bay, though I'm only a couple of chapters in so can't really comment yet). I didn't have any problem with the dialect, though I know one or two people who did - there's a glossary in the back of the book that's worth bookmarking for anyone who does find the dialect words puzzling.

I still like Tranter's Bruce trilogy, having re-read it a few months ago. I noticed Robert Low's author's note said 'I hope Nigel Tranter is not birling in his grave too much', or words to that effect, which was a nice touch :-)
PATHS OF EXILE - love, war, honour and betrayal in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria
Editor's Choice, Historical Novels Review, August 2009
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