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What Are You Reading? January 2012

For discussions of historical fiction. Threads that do not relate to historical fiction should be started in the Chat forum or elsewhere on the forum, depending on the topic.
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Tanzanite
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Location: Northern Virginia
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Post by Tanzanite » Wed January 4th, 2012, 10:47 pm

I've been reading Fortune Made His Sword by Martha Rofheart (an OOP about Henry V).

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TiciaRoma
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Location: Alexandria, VA

Post by TiciaRoma » Thu January 5th, 2012, 3:38 am

EC's The Scarlet Lion. The audible version. This is a re-read for me, but made good listening on our 1500 mile trip back from our Christmas vacation.

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Posts: 3562
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favourite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Thu January 5th, 2012, 4:50 am

a memoir, Flight of Passage by Rinker Buck. It's set in 1966, which I refuse to call historical. But good.

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emr
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Location: Castilla

Post by emr » Thu January 5th, 2012, 10:39 am

A Room Full of Bones by Elly Griffiths, the new Ruth Galloway mystery.
"So many books, so little time."
— Frank Zappa

annis
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Post by annis » Thu January 5th, 2012, 4:15 pm

I didn't now there was a new Elly Griffiths out- must hunt it down. I've enjoyed the others in the Ruth Galloway series.

Currently reading the latest in another of my favourite series- I Am Half-Sick of Shadows, the newest Flavia de Luce mystery from Alan Bradley. These are utterly eccentric but quite brilliant, with their precociously smart yet touchingly vulnerable young heroine.
Last edited by annis on Thu January 5th, 2012, 4:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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lauragill
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Post by lauragill » Thu January 5th, 2012, 6:05 pm

Russka by Edward Rutherford. It's not as good as Sarum or London.

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Madeleine
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Currently reading: "The Infirmary" by L J Ross
Preferred HF: Plantagenets, Victorian, crime
Location: Essex/London

Post by Madeleine » Fri January 6th, 2012, 9:46 am

[quote=""annis""]I didn't now there was a new Elly Griffiths out- must hunt it down. I've enjoyed the others in the Ruth Galloway series.

Currently reading the latest in another of my favourite series- I Am Half-Sick of Shadows, the newest Flavia de Luce mystery from Alan Bradley. These are utterly eccentric but quite brilliant, with their precociously smart yet touchingly vulnerable young heroine.[/quote]


I like Elly Griffiths's books, I think the new one has only just come out in hb.

I've also just bought the first two Flavia de Luce books, I've heard they're very good.
Currently reading: "The Infirmary" by L J Ross

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LoobyG
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Location: Derbyshire, UK

Post by LoobyG » Fri January 6th, 2012, 10:00 am

Now on 'Shadow of the Titanic - the extraordinary stories of those who survived' by Andrew Wilson :)

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Brenna
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Post by Brenna » Fri January 6th, 2012, 1:49 pm

So I finished Ian Mortimer's The Greatest Traitor and I have to ask those who know way more than I do about Edward II. Did he really "survive" during Roger's reign and then die by his son's hand? Is this commonly believed or did I. Mortimer go out on a limb? And is there really evidence that the Queen had a child by R. Mortimer? The evidence suggested in the book was not very convincing to me.
Brenna

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boswellbaxter
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Post by boswellbaxter » Fri January 6th, 2012, 3:08 pm

[quote=""Brenna""]So I finished Ian Mortimer's The Greatest Traitor and I have to ask those who know way more than I do about Edward II. Did he really "survive" during Roger's reign and then die by his son's hand? Is this commonly believed or did I. Mortimer go out on a limb? And is there really evidence that the Queen had a child by R. Mortimer? The evidence suggested in the book was not very convincing to me.[/quote]

Paul Doherty and Alison Weir have also argued for the survival theory but I'm not convinced of it. I'm not as current on Edward II scholarship as I used to be, but I think both Roy Haines and Seymour Phillips, Edward II's major biographers, believe that he died at Berkeley Castle. (On the other hand, a friend of mine who has studied Edward II's reign in depth believes that Mortimer makes a very good case.) As for the child, I don't believe there is any hard evidence of this.
Susan Higginbotham
Coming in October: The Woodvilles


http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/
http://www.susanhigginbotham.com/blog/

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