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any historical personages you wish had fiction composed about them

For discussions of historical fiction. Threads that do not relate to historical fiction should be started in the Chat forum or elsewhere on the forum, depending on the topic.
annis
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Post by annis » Tue May 19th, 2009, 12:46 am

King Manfred of Sicily, a son of Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II. This tragic hero took my fancy after I read Martin Davies' novel "Unicorn Road". He's another one of the many fascinating figures from medieval Sicily who seem to have become lost in time.

Chatterbox
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Post by Chatterbox » Wed May 20th, 2009, 10:46 pm

Interestingly... Just got Vanora Bennett's latest about Catherine de Valois. Skimming through the pages it seems as if Christine de Pisan (aka de Pizan) plays a role in it -- I seem to remember she was one of the characters a few people had mentioned wishing to see in a book.

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emr
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Post by emr » Thu May 21st, 2009, 8:18 am

Eleanor of England, daughter of Henry II, married to Alfonso VIII of Castilla.
I have Raquel, the Jewess of Toledo by Lion Feuchtwanger in my TBR pile forever but I'd like to see something more personal about her, not only about her husband's mistress. She died only one month after him which in my book counts for a loving and grieving wife.

Chatterbox
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Post by Chatterbox » Thu May 21st, 2009, 8:05 pm

Speaking of English princesses marrying Iberian kings...

How about something focusing on Philippa, daughter of John of Gaunt, who married the king of Portugal and was the mother of (along with many other children) Henry the Navigator? She lived in fascinating times in England and Henry would make a great additional character.

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rex icelingas
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Post by rex icelingas » Thu May 28th, 2009, 6:03 am

Vortigern is a major one,given his influence on post Roman Britain Im very suprised not more has been done individually about him

The Lord Rhys/Rhys ap Gruffudd,Prince of Deheubarth has a very interesting story especially his involvemnt with Henry II,would love perhaps EC or Sharon Penman to have a go here!

Shapur I,a novel written from the Sassanid point of view,there are a few books dealing with Roman incursions into Persia perhaps one from the other side?

Gwenllian ferch Gruffudd ap Cynan could be turned into a very capable romantic adventure

Maelgwn Hir,second only to Arthur in the number of times hes mentioned in Welsh Historical texts but yet no books about one of the most interesting characters of the period of late antiquity

Zenobia of Palmyra
Cadwallon of Gwynedd
Magnus Maximus
Anthemius
plenty more..

Carla
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Post by Carla » Thu May 28th, 2009, 5:56 pm

In the historical note in Twilight of Avalon, author Anna Elliott says that her secondary character Madoc of Gwynedd is loosely based on Maelgwn. (I haven't read the rest of the book yet - I always start with the historical note.)

Zenobia of Palmyra features in Judith Weingarten's novel The Rebel Queen (review here: http://www.carlanayland.org/reviews/zen ... _queen.htm), although she doesn't appear until halfway through.

Gwenllian ferch Gruffuyd ab Cynan - is she the one who was killed at Kidwelly around the time of the Stephen/Matilda civil war? You're right, it does seem extraordinary that she hasn't become as well established a literary figure as Boudica.
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Lauryn
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Post by Lauryn » Fri May 29th, 2009, 4:36 am

[quote=""zsigandr""]I personally would be interested in something written from the point of view of Louis XI of France. Everyone, I am sure, has heard of the "spider king", but I would like to see something written from his point of view and how it must have been for his 3 wives (Margaret of Scotland, Charlotte of Savoy, and Catherine D'Mailly) to live with such a man.[/quote]

I have an older book on my shelf, The Spider King, by Lawrence Schoonover, copyright 1954. A little pedantic, but interesting, especially when read back-to-back with material dealing with Charles the Bold, of Burgundy. I don't know how available it is though - I know nothing at all about Schoonover.
Even the mighty oak was once just a nut that held its ground.

Chatterbox
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Post by Chatterbox » Sun June 14th, 2009, 11:14 pm

And one more to throw out there -- came across this woman in my research into the Mowbray family. In all the centuries that there has been an "Earl Marshal" in the English nobility, there was one period (abt 20 years) where the office was discharged by a woman! She was the daughter of Thomas of Brotherton, half-brother to Edward II. Her brother predeceased her, and so the Norfolk title was passed through her, to her daughter and the latter's husband, a Mowbray. But for about 20 years, until 1377, I seem to recall, Margaret herself held the office of Marshal of England. Quite amazing! She seems also to have led a lively private life; she fled to Europe in pursuit of her lover; she (or her husband) was trying to get a divorce when he conveniently died. She later married her lover. None of her sons survived; only daughters.

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Mon June 15th, 2009, 2:09 am

[quote=""Chatterbox""]And one more to throw out there -- came across this woman in my research into the Mowbray family. In all the centuries that there has been an "Earl Marshal" in the English nobility, there was one period (abt 20 years) where the office was discharged by a woman! She was the daughter of Thomas of Brotherton, half-brother to Edward II. Her brother predeceased her, and so the Norfolk title was passed through her, to her daughter and the latter's husband, a Mowbray. But for about 20 years, until 1377, I seem to recall, Margaret herself held the office of Marshal of England. Quite amazing! She seems also to have led a lively private life; she fled to Europe in pursuit of her lover; she (or her husband) was trying to get a divorce when he conveniently died. She later married her lover. None of her sons survived; only daughters.[/quote]

She wasn't the first female Earl Marshal of England though. Mahelt(Matilda) Marshal (about whose earlier life I am writing), was Marshal of England for two years from 1246-1248. When her last brother died, Mahelt inherited the Marshal's rod and passed it on to her son Roger Bigod III when she died....
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

Chatterbox
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Post by Chatterbox » Mon June 15th, 2009, 3:49 am

Cool! For some reason, her name didn't come up on whatever piece of research threw up the tidbit on Margaret. Will look forward to your book! I'm always fascinated by evidence that comes up, again and again, of strong women exerting power in this era. It certainly wouldn't have been the norm, and it may have provoked wrath on the part of many (Eleanor of Aquitaine, Isabel of Valois, wife to Edward II), but it happened...

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