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any historical personages you wish had fiction composed about them

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chuck
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Stilicho and Magnus Maximum

Post by chuck » Sat October 11th, 2008, 2:30 pm

[quote=""annis""]Stilicho appears in the first part of William Napier's book "Attila" aka "The Scourge of God" (the first in a trilogy). It uses the old premise that Attlila was in his youth a hostage at the Western Roman Empire's capital of Ravenna under the guardianship of Stilicho.

Whether Attila ever was a hostage or not is open to debate as there is no extant evidence to prove he was, but it an old story which has been repeated often enough to become accepted as fact.
Certainly Attila's adversary Aetius was a hostage with the Huns.

Stilicho is a fscinating man who certainly deserves his own novel.[/quote]

Stilicho had a brief and important passage in a early novel of Jack Whyte's Camulod Novels...I too; concur add a novel about Stilicho and I'll add another about the tragic Magnus Maximus....a favorite era of mine......
Last edited by chuck on Sat October 11th, 2008, 2:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: spelling

annis
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Post by annis » Sat October 11th, 2008, 10:21 pm

If you Google Jan Safarik, you will find a list of all aces of all wars on his web site, and the section on the USSR's fighter aces has info and photos of Litvak and other women. She flew a modern fighter, a Yak, I believe.
Wow, an amazing amount of info on Jan Safarik's site. He must be the ultimate train ( make that plane) spotter!

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donroc
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Post by donroc » Sat October 11th, 2008, 11:21 pm

Yes, Safarak has a great site, and he cites many sources.

Aside from the Soviet women, I have been interested in the Jewish fighter aces of WWI&II. The awardee of the Blue Max in WWI is covered and aces of the Battle of Britain including "Lucky" Tuck.


The late historian for the U.S. Fighter Aces Association, Col. Ray Toliver, was a dear friend who wrote books about the U.S. and Luftwaffe aces of WWII. I met many at his home including Tuck, Adolf Galland, and Jim Brooks who wed the singer "Liltin'" Martha Tilton.
Image

Bodo the Apostate, a novel set during the reign of Louis the Pious and end of the Carolingian Empire.

http://www.donaldmichaelplatt.com
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXZthhY6 ... annel_page

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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Mon October 13th, 2008, 6:34 am

[quote=""eclecticreader10""]I think someone should write about Anne Boleyn because no one ever writes about her.[/quote]


Or her daughter. What's her name again? You know the one!
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There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

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diamondlil
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Post by diamondlil » Mon October 13th, 2008, 6:35 am

[quote=""donroc""]Lidia Litvak would be a good one. I know a play had been written about her in the USSR. I know of no novel.

Who was she?

She was and is the all time top female fighter ace of all wars with 15 aerial victories for the USSR during WWII and known as The White Rose of Stalingrad.

Another novel might be written about the "Night Witches", which is what the Germans called the Soviet female fliers during WWII.

No computerized guns in those days.[/quote]


I would totally love to read about this person!
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There are two ways of spreading light: to be the candle or the mirror that reflects it.

Edith Wharton

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donroc
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Post by donroc » Mon October 13th, 2008, 11:47 am

[quote=""diamondlil""]I would totally love to read about this person![/quote]

Aside from the Jan Safarik site, if you Google Lydia Litvak, you will find plenty of information about her, even in Wikipedia.

Our ladies who wanted to fly during WWII were fortunate to make it into the WASPS.

Budnova was another female Soviet fighter ace with 11 victories.
Image

Bodo the Apostate, a novel set during the reign of Louis the Pious and end of the Carolingian Empire.

http://www.donaldmichaelplatt.com
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RXZthhY6 ... annel_page

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Volgadon
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Post by Volgadon » Mon October 13th, 2008, 2:53 pm

[quote=""donroc""]Yes, Safarak has a great site, and he cites many sources.

Aside from the Soviet women, I have been interested in the Jewish fighter aces of WWI&II. The awardee of the Blue Max in WWI is covered and aces of the Battle of Britain including "Lucky" Tuck.


The late historian for the U.S. Fighter Aces Association, Col. Ray Toliver, was a dear friend who wrote books about the U.S. and Luftwaffe aces of WWII. I met many at his home including Tuck, Adolf Galland, and Jim Brooks who wed the singer "Liltin'" Martha Tilton.[/quote]

There was an interesting documentary aired on Israel's Channel 1 about female Jewish veterans from WW2. The 1st episode was about veterans of the Red Army and one of them would pick up lend-lease planes in Alaska and fly them over to Russia.

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Volgadon
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Post by Volgadon » Mon October 13th, 2008, 3:05 pm

Here are some pics of Litvak and friends.

Image


Image

She did fly yaks. This site is in Russian, but shows her aircraft. http://www.airwar.ru/history/aces/ace2w ... itvak.html

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Kveto from Prague
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pilots

Post by Kveto from Prague » Mon October 13th, 2008, 4:59 pm

[quote=""donroc""]Annis, thank you.

If you Google Jan Safarik, you will find a list of all aces of all wars on his web site, and the section on the USSR's fighter aces has info and photos of Litvak and other women. She flew a modern fighter, a Yak, I believe.[/quote]

heres the site.
http://aces.safarikovi.org/

thanks Donroc, for pointing out this interesting and informative site. made by my fellow countryman im proud to notice.

i think there are a lot of interesting stories about ariel aces to be told. the czechoslovak pilots who flew for the RAF during the war are a popular topic here. also tragic stories, as their familes left here were tossed in concentration camps. then when they came home and the communists came to power, these pilots were often imprisoned as they had visited the "evil" west.

im sure a lot of good stories to be told.

but im guessing you arent writing a book on Litvakova, otherwise you'd be letting us in on one of your secrets :-)

annis
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Post by annis » Mon October 13th, 2008, 9:34 pm

In England Giles Whittell recently published an interesting book, called
"Spitfire Women" telling the forgotten story of the women who ferried Spitfires around the country, freeing up the RAF pilots for combat.
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/artic ... sions.html

http://www.forum.militaryltd.com/world- ... -women.htm

This book led to a campaign to have these women recognised for their work during the war:
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/u ... 404061.ece

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