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any historical personages you wish had fiction composed about them

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Amanda
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Post by Amanda » Sun March 14th, 2010, 11:35 am

[quote=""Jemidar""]Anne Easter Smith's Daughter of York is about Margaret of York and whetted my appetite for more about her. So yes, more would be good :) .

On another thread (sorry can't remember which one offhand :o ) there's been mention of at least one book about Margaret of Austria...something about an improper relationship with a Bishop or Cardinal, I believe.

And I agree entirely, Margaret Douglas would be very good. I'd also like to see more about her, definitely :D .
[/quote]

I'd forgotten about Daughter of York...it is on a shelf somewhere as yet unread.

I do have a book about Margaret Douglas but the title is escaping me atm. I only picked it up fairly recently...... :o

ETA: It is Green Salamander by Pamela Hill.
Last edited by Amanda on Sun March 14th, 2010, 11:39 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Jemidar
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Post by Jemidar » Sun March 14th, 2010, 1:37 pm

[quote=""Amanda""]I'd forgotten about Daughter of York...it is on a shelf somewhere as yet unread.

I do have a book about Margaret Douglas but the title is escaping me atm. I only picked it up fairly recently...... :o

ETA: It is Green Salamander by Pamela Hill.[/quote]


Thanks Amanda :) .

I liked Daughter of York but I came to it without any prior knowledge of her (other than her existence) so found it really interesting, new and fresh. I believe accuracy wise, it's not too bad, with only a couple of deviations. There certainly wasn't anything that jumped out at me as totally outrageous except maybe that her fictional dwarf/fool married William Caxton.

ETA: The book about Margaret of Austria is The Cardinal & the Queen by Evelyn Anthony. It's mentioned on the 'Book Shopping' thread.
Last edited by Jemidar on Sun March 14th, 2010, 1:47 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Jenny

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Kveto from Prague
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Post by Kveto from Prague » Sun March 14th, 2010, 5:41 pm

[quote=""annis""]Posted by Princess


Just recently read Elisabeth McNeill's novel, "Flodden Field" which is the story of James IV's disastrous campaign against England during the reign of Henry VIII. (Sorry, those Henries just keep sneaking in!) The Scottish king managed to get himself and half the Scottish nobility killed instead of gaining the military glory he longed for. James IV was an interesting person- physically imposing, handsome, fiercely intelligent and cultured- a Renaissance monarch, but he had this blind need to prove himself in battle. It destroyed him, and pretty much Scotland as well.

The novel does quite a good job of showing the difficutlies of achieving dominant central leadership in a country ruled by clan loyalties, and in dealing with the Scottish chieftains and English nobility on the Anglo-Scottish border- they had more in common with each other than with kings of either country.

][/quote]

Nigel Tranter (of course) wrote a book about the aftermath of Flodden Field. I cant really recommend it when the premise of the basis of the book is built on goes against the history. The book is about one of the scottish survivors who is captured and held for ransome by an english lord. But henry VIII gave orders that the English were to take no prisoners in that battle. all defeated scots were executed on the spot (pretty much a war crime by any standards. but all henry gets blamed for is killing wives. still, what a brutal bastard.)

I always dislike when a book is built around a premise that goes against the historical record. dont remember much about the book other than that. your milage may vary.

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Gabriele Campbell
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Post by Gabriele Campbell » Sun March 14th, 2010, 6:16 pm

Maybe that English lord didn't tell Henry. :p

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Kveto from Prague
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Post by Kveto from Prague » Sun March 14th, 2010, 6:37 pm

[quote=""Gabriele Campbell""]Maybe that English lord didn't tell Henry. :p [/quote]

possible. but would any ransome be worth double-crossing a guy who had just said "kill all prisoners." :-)

annis
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Post by annis » Sun March 14th, 2010, 6:38 pm

Posted by Jemidar
ETA: The book about Margaret of Austria is The Cardinal & the Queen by Evelyn Anthony. It's mentioned on the 'Book Shopping' thread.
Sorry to disappoint, but "The Cardinal and the Queen" is about Margaret's daughter, Anne of Austria (mother of Louis XIV of France) and Richelieu.
Last edited by annis on Sun March 14th, 2010, 6:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Gabriele Campbell
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Post by Gabriele Campbell » Sun March 14th, 2010, 6:58 pm

[quote=""keny from prague""]possible. but would any ransome be worth double-crossing a guy who had just said "kill all prisoners." :-) [/quote]

Double crossing kings was pretty much a sport. Sure, sometimes it left you a head shorter, but that didn't prevent the nobles from playing all sort of intrigues. :)

Do you remember the title of the novel?

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Kveto from Prague
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Post by Kveto from Prague » Sun March 14th, 2010, 7:21 pm

[quote=""Gabriele Campbell""]Double crossing kings was pretty much a sport. Sure, sometimes it left you a head shorter, but that didn't prevent the nobles from playing all sort of intrigues. :)

Do you remember the title of the novel?[/quote]


oh, sorry. its called "balefire" .

oh the "historical miscue" thing is just a pet peeve of mine. It sometimes impedes my enjoyment of a book, other times i overlook it easily.

for example, i remember a short story about a Templar who was spared by Saladin after the battle of Hattin and sent on a mission of some sort. but i shut out the rest of the story because both crusader and islamic records agree, Saladin beheaded every single Templar prisoner after that battle, except the Master of the temple. There were no other Tempars spared. So when the whole book is built around something that is considered a "fact" (as far as these things go) it just turns me off.

but thats me.

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Jemidar
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Post by Jemidar » Sun March 14th, 2010, 8:04 pm

[quote=""keny from prague""]The book is about one of the scottish survivors who is captured and held for ransome by an english lord. But henry VIII gave orders that the English were to take no prisoners in that battle. all defeated scots were executed on the spot (pretty much a war crime by any standards. but all henry gets blamed for is killing wives. still, what a brutal bastard.)[/quote]


I think you'll find that this is one atrocity that Henry Vlll didn't commit. He was away waging war on the French at the time and Katherine of Aragon, left at home as Regent, was the one who ultimately gave the orders at Flodden. When she was told that James' body had been found among the battle dead, she also gave orders that his head was to be cut off
(remember that this is her brother-in-law we're talking about) and sent to Henry in France, but was advised that this wasn't quite the done thing in England, so she settled for sending his bloodied clothes to Henry instead. Apparently Henry wasn't all that impressed by her gift, mostly because Katherine was having much more success at home against the Scots than he was in France.

ETA: The Duke of Norfolk was Katherine's General so if it wasn't on her orders, then it would've been on his.


Last edited by Jemidar on Mon March 15th, 2010, 6:53 am, edited 2 times in total.
Jenny

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Laurel Thatcher Ulrich

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Margaret
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Post by Margaret » Sun March 14th, 2010, 11:52 pm

Plotbunnies are cute looking little critters, but the moment you stop to look at them or worse, pet them, they'll display razor sharp teeth and stick to your ankle or hand, and then you have to write their story. Usually, they breed, and often they bring their family and friends and turn trilogy on you. Or they are very enticing but you'll have to hunt down their warren to get the whole story.
Aha! Thanks, Gabrielle. I think I have a few of these hanging onto me already. :D
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