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Questions for EC about specific books, characters etc

Ash
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Questions for EC about specific books, characters etc

Post by Ash » Sat September 27th, 2008, 11:59 pm

SPOILER ALERT SPOILER ALERT SPOILER ALERT



EC, I have a question about Marion. In your author notes you mention that her character was based on history. Was the story of her treason as well? Wow, I just can't imagine in that day and age a young woman doing that to her own family - tho she was a bit deranged by that time.

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nona
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Post by nona » Sun October 5th, 2008, 6:54 pm

EC, my husband and I both love your books as you might guess, we were wondering if you ever do any book signings here in the US or ever plan to. If not how can find a schedule to plan a vacation around it, he's really smitten with your William Marshall books and would love to have you sign them for him and I've always dreamed of visiting England, might as well kill to birds with one stone, eh? lol.

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Sun October 5th, 2008, 9:04 pm

[quote=""nona""]EC, my husband and I both love your books as you might guess, we were wondering if you ever do any book signings here in the US or ever plan to. If not how can find a schedule to plan a vacation around it, he's really smitten with your William Marshall books and would love to have you sign them for him and I've always dreamed of visiting England, might as well kill to birds with one stone, eh? lol.[/quote]

LOL Nona!
Well The Greatest Knight and Lords of the White Castle have been bought by a USA publisher for Fall 2009. I don't have a passport at the moment,(old one expired) but I'm planning on getting one again. It's a future plan, and if the novels take off it's a definite, but still way in the distance.
If you come to the UK, I can always fix to meet up somewhere in your itinerary. I've met quite a few USA friends from different e-lists that way.
Failing that I can just send you some bookplates :)
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Sun October 5th, 2008, 9:09 pm

[quote=""Ash""]SPOILER ALERT SPOILER ALERT SPOILER ALERT



EC, I have a question about Marion. In your author notes you mention that her character was based on history. Was the story of her treason as well? Wow, I just can't imagine in that day and age a young woman doing that to her own family - tho she was a bit deranged by that time.[/quote]

Ash, I've only just seen this - I sometimes miss posts if they've gone off the top. Sorry. I wasn't being ignorant, I just hadn't noticed. I think I've answered it elsewhere now.The original chronicle does mention her treason and what happened to her afterwards, but there's nothing in historical sources which are very patchy about what happened. The end result was the same - what happened to Ludlow - but how it came about is not certain. There's the chronicle's version of events, but they may well have been souped up to make a good round the fire tale. Who knows now?
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

Ash
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Post by Ash » Sat August 8th, 2009, 8:35 pm

EC, I am very much enjoying Falcons of Montebard but I have a question. When the king was beseiged by Balak (cant remember the castle's name, begins with a K) why did his men not try to shoot the men who were mining the walls? It seemed like everybody was just waiting for something to happen. Or did I miss something?

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EC2
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Post by EC2 » Sat August 8th, 2009, 8:48 pm

[quote=""Ash""]EC, I am very much enjoying Falcons of Montebard but I have a question. When the king was beseiged by Balak (cant remember the castle's name, begins with a K) why did his men not try to shoot the men who were mining the walls? It seemed like everybody was just waiting for something to happen. Or did I miss something?[/quote]

Ash, once I've written a book, it's out there for the readers and I don't often revisit it myself - which means I sometimes give a blank look and say 'I don't remember!' :o
From what I recall of the research (and yes, a wall was undermined and that was how they got in), there was no mention of shooting from the walls. I guess it would depend what kind of supplies were available in the keep, and no arrow would equal no covering fire. (my excuse and I'm sticking to it :) ) Kharpurt was the name I think, without going away from my PC to look. If I'd not been following the VP of the people in the castle, I'd love to have gone with Joscelin of Edessa as he crossed the river with his goatskin 'waterwings'!
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

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Margaret
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Post by Margaret » Sun August 9th, 2009, 3:23 am

There's a scene in Bernard Cornwell's Agincourt which involves mining under the city walls, and the besiegers built timber shelters to get under when they were near the walls. It wasn't foolproof, because they still got shot at while building the shelters and dashing into them, but it meant they weren't constantly exposed the whole time they were next to the walls.
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annis
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Post by annis » Sun August 9th, 2009, 3:48 am

Margaret's right. Miners were protected by temporary shelters as they worked- though I imagine the odd one copped an arrow if he wasn't careful! Mining was one of the best ways to breach a wall, though it was a slow process. A tunnel was dug from the besieger’s lines to under the wall to be breached, once under the foundation, the tunnel was extended laterally along the wall front. The chamber was supported by timbers and once it was of a sufficient size, it was filled with combustible material and then set alight. Once the wooden props had burned away the section of wall above was thus unsupported and gave way falling into the cavity created by the mining, producing the required breach.

Mining could be obstructed by making the base of the walls wider (eg. spurs, talus, etc.) making the wall more stable. The only active counter measure to mining was counter mining. A mine was excavated from inside the castle to intercept the incoming mine. The combat which occurred when the two mines met in those dark, cramped conditions was on of the most horrific aspects of early siege warfare.

There was also a good example of counter-mining in BC's "Azincourt", with the resulting underground encounter described pretty graphically.

I kept thinking those shelters had a name, then I remembered that they were called "sows". They were mobile shelters which were used throughout the medieval period, and allowed workers to fill in moats with protection from the defenders (thus levelling the ground for the siege towers to be moved to the walls), and for protection when digging mines.
Last edited by annis on Sun August 9th, 2009, 5:16 am, edited 6 times in total.

Ash
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Post by Ash » Sun August 9th, 2009, 4:40 am

Thanks guys, that answered my question! And EC, I just finished the book. Just when I thought the story was over, you throw in the final chase. OMG I had my heart in my throat reading it. Excellent book - I think its one of your best, imo, up there with the Marshall books and Shadows and Strongholds. Eager for more!

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nona
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Post by nona » Sun August 9th, 2009, 2:37 pm

EC I noticed a few of your titles are being rereleased with new covers but I noticed that The Wid Hunt, The Leopard Unleashed and The Running Vixen is not among them, can we expect them to come at a later date then?

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