Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Good Historical Atlas

Post Reply
User avatar
TiciaRoma
Reader
Posts: 149
Joined: October 2011
Location: Alexandria, VA

Good Historical Atlas

Post by TiciaRoma » Tue November 15th, 2011, 3:17 am

Can someone recommend a decent historical atlas that covers the British Isles from the time of the Roman invasion through at least the Tudors? I find myself having to search back through maps in various other books I've read in order to keep up with things if the author hasn't included a map.

I sometimes get a bit hazy with locations of tribes, Roman cities and roads, various invasions, cities, and districts.

Carla
Compulsive Reader
Posts: 965
Joined: August 2008
Contact:

Post by Carla » Tue November 15th, 2011, 7:03 pm

The Ordnance Survey (national mapping agency) publishes various historical maps - their website is here: http://www.shop.ordnancesurveyleisure.c ... rical-maps. I have a copy of the Roman Britain map, which has the tribes, Roman roads, villas, forts and cities marked on it, and also shows relief (height above modern sea level) by colour shading so you can see the mountains, valleys and plains. It's the whole of the British Isles on one large double-sided folded sheet, so it gives a good at-a-glance overview. The Roman sites are marked as an overlay on a modern map, so the underlying map shows the modern coastline (not the Roman coastline) and modern built-up areas like the London conurbation. This is good for locating modern place names in relation to Roman ones (e.g. Leicester is marked both as 'Leicester' and 'Ratae Corieltavorvm' in different fonts), and for novels that use modern place names, but it could be confusing if you want to know e.g. about the Roman coastline.

Hope this helps.
PATHS OF EXILE - love, war, honour and betrayal in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria
Editor's Choice, Historical Novels Review, August 2009
Now available as e-book on Amazon Kindleand in Kindle, Epub (Nook, Sony Reader), Palm and other formats on Smashwords
Website: http://www.carlanayland.org
Blog: http://carlanayland.blogspot.com

User avatar
TiciaRoma
Reader
Posts: 149
Joined: October 2011
Location: Alexandria, VA

Post by TiciaRoma » Tue November 15th, 2011, 8:19 pm

Thanks for your advice, Carla. I looked on the OS website and decided on two of their maps. Ancient Britain and Roman Britain. I found them at a reasonable price on amazon. I took the $17.95 new copies, the next lowest price was $194 which makes me feel like I got a bargain.

Carla
Compulsive Reader
Posts: 965
Joined: August 2008
Contact:

Post by Carla » Wed November 16th, 2011, 1:38 pm

Glad to be of help, and I hope you find the maps useful. $194! - one wonders what on earth the seller is thinking of....
PATHS OF EXILE - love, war, honour and betrayal in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria
Editor's Choice, Historical Novels Review, August 2009
Now available as e-book on Amazon Kindleand in Kindle, Epub (Nook, Sony Reader), Palm and other formats on Smashwords
Website: http://www.carlanayland.org
Blog: http://carlanayland.blogspot.com

SGM
Compulsive Reader
Posts: 699
Joined: March 2010

Post by SGM » Wed November 16th, 2011, 6:53 pm

I have quite a few historical atlases but I actually really just enjoy looking at them but also naturally find them invaluable sources of information because I don't believe you can understand a country's history unless you understand their geography and the geography of what is around them.

Having said that, I don't actually own one that is specifically of Britain. But although small in size, the Penquin Historical Atlas which is in paperback form in two volumes (and sized about A5) is my desert island book and is jammed packed with stuff. I also have several large "coffee-table-book sized" historical atlases - The Times Historical Atlas is good (I bought mine from a remaindered bookshop so it was not too expensive). The Cassells Historical Atlas, again, in two volumes is good. The only one I am not fond of is the Dorling Kindersley (or whatever they are called) one but I bought it to cut up and use to make my own maps from so I wasn't all that bothered.

You will find on Archive.org (and probably Gutenberg) a School Atlas of Britain (which wil be free) and is quite useful, assuming you are not actually interested in 20th century maps because you won't find anything after the 19th century.

I hope that helps.
Currently reading - Emergence of a Nation State by Alan Smith

User avatar
TiciaRoma
Reader
Posts: 149
Joined: October 2011
Location: Alexandria, VA

Post by TiciaRoma » Thu November 17th, 2011, 3:09 am

Thank you SGM! I've been enjoying "thumbing through" the School Atlas you mentioned. I think I'd prefer a book format for easy reference while I'm reading. I'll check out some of the other atlases you mentioned.

Post Reply

Return to “Questions and Research”