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Was Jane Austen poisoned?

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annis
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Was Jane Austen poisoned?

Post by annis » Mon November 14th, 2011, 6:04 pm

Crime writer Lindsay Ashford has been studying records relating to Jane Austen's illness and claims that her early death may have been caused by arsenic poisoning. A sensational interpretation would be murder, but arsenic-based medication, commonly used at the time, seems a more likely culprit.

Article here:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/no ... -poisoning

SGM
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Post by SGM » Mon November 14th, 2011, 6:53 pm

[quote=""annis""]Crime writer Lindsay Ashford has been studying records relating to Jane Austen's illness and claims that her early death may have been caused by arsenic poisoning. A sensational interpretation would be murder, but arsenic-based medication, commonly used at the time, seems a more likely culprit.

Article here:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/no ... -poisoning[/quote]

Wallpaper used to contain it, but probably in late Victorian times and if a room was damp, the wallpaper oozed arsenic. But that would probably not be true in Jane Austen's time.
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lauragill
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Post by lauragill » Mon November 14th, 2011, 7:29 pm

[quote=""annis""]Crime writer Lindsay Ashford has been studying records relating to Jane Austen's illness and claims that her early death may have been caused by arsenic poisoning. A sensational interpretation would be murder, but arsenic-based medication, commonly used at the time, seems a more likely culprit.

Article here:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/no ... -poisoning[/quote]

Who would want to kill Jane Austen?

annis
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Post by annis » Tue November 15th, 2011, 12:10 am

The "M' word is clearly just an attention-grabber on Ashford's part - she is trying to promote her book, after all - but more credibly, she goes on to say to the Guardian:

"Fowler's Solution [was used] as a treatment for everything from rheumatism – something Austen complained of in her letters – to syphilis.

After all my research I think it's highly likely she [Austen] was given a medicine containing arsenic. When you look at her list of symptoms and compare them to the list of arsenic symptoms, there is an amazing correlation"
Last edited by annis on Tue November 15th, 2011, 12:13 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Divia
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Post by Divia » Tue November 15th, 2011, 1:51 am

[quote=""SGM""]Wallpaper used to contain it, but probably in late Victorian times and if a room was damp, the wallpaper oozed arsenic. But that would probably not be true in Jane Austen's time.[/quote]

Oh, I did not know. Interesting.

The author of the article is obviously a genius. :rolleyes: Nice way to grab attention for your book. *yawn*
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LoveHistory
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Post by LoveHistory » Tue November 15th, 2011, 5:09 pm

There's a bit more in there. The author of the book also mentioned some murder motives within Austen's family. I got the impression that the book is about the possible murder. Should be an interesting read.

I can believe she died of arsenic poisoning, but I doubt it was intentional.

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