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erechwydd
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Post by erechwydd » Sat November 19th, 2011, 9:42 pm

the characters may believe in it, and it shapes their actions and decisions, but the reader can decide whether to share the belief.
I do like it when it's done like that. Not that I dislike various manifestations that might be termed 'magic' of sorts (the first novel I wrote was historical fantasy, and there's more in that genre I want to write), but in this sort of setting, where the novel seems to be leaning more towards realism, it's nice to be given that choice as a reader. I noticed that in the 'Historical Novels Review' it was suggested that there was quite a bit of 'fantasy' in Moon in Leo - would you say it's more prominent in this novel as compared to the trilogy?
Gah, talking about these books...I want to read all three now, and I still have eight set texts to get through. :eek: However, I do now have an extra reason to read Moon in Leo as soon as I can, as a holiday in Cumbria has been mooted for next year - it would be nice to get an idea of the story in the landscape before we go. :)
Last edited by erechwydd on Tue November 22nd, 2011, 8:19 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Carla
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Post by Carla » Sun November 20th, 2011, 6:00 pm

Yes, I thought fantasy was more prominent in Moon In Leo than in the trilogy (even more so than Ghost in the Sunlight, which shares some of the same magical themes, and definitely more than the other two). Not so much the goddess worship, which is a belief held by the characters, but the scrying/out-of-body travel, which is very close to actual magic that works.

If you're going to south Cumbria and particularly to the Furness peninsula, do read Moon In Leo first, or take it with you (or, indeed, both). The landscape is so beautifully described that it's almost a character in its own right. In the areas I know - mainly in the Coniston Fells - I could follow every inch of the landscape (even down to tracing Rosamond's exact route over the Walna Scar Road and the tarn she gets lost at), and in the areas I don't know I could trace pretty much every place in the book on a large scale map. The Trifolium blog has some photographs of some of the locations here (http://trifoliumbooks.blogspot.com/2011 ... aries.html) and here (http://trifoliumbooks.blogspot.com/2011 ... rness.html).
PATHS OF EXILE - love, war, honour and betrayal in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria
Editor's Choice, Historical Novels Review, August 2009
Now available as e-book on Amazon Kindleand in Kindle, Epub (Nook, Sony Reader), Palm and other formats on Smashwords
Website: http://www.carlanayland.org
Blog: http://carlanayland.blogspot.com

erechwydd
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Post by erechwydd » Tue November 22nd, 2011, 8:18 pm

Thanks for those links, Carla; there are some lovely locations there. I get the impression that perhaps stone circles play an important role! The Walna Scar Road and surrounds I looked up on Google, and I have to say it's an amazing landscape. I'm not sure how many places I'll manage to see, but I'll definitely take the book.

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wendy
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Post by wendy » Wed November 23rd, 2011, 1:16 pm

I've been absent doing research, but a belated welcome to you Beth!
Wendy K. Perriman
Fire on Dark Water (Penguin, 2011)
http://www.wendyperriman.com
http://www.FireOnDarkWater.com

Carla
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Post by Carla » Wed November 23rd, 2011, 5:46 pm

[quote=""erechwydd""]Thanks for those links, Carla; there are some lovely locations there. I get the impression that perhaps stone circles play an important role! The Walna Scar Road and surrounds I looked up on Google, and I have to say it's an amazing landscape. I'm not sure how many places I'll manage to see, but I'll definitely take the book.[/quote]

There's a nice scene of a summer fair at the stone circle on Birkrigg Common. Sorry, of course you said you hadn't been to Cumbria (apart from Tebay), so I should have looked up some links of Walna Scar for you! I like fell-walking (when I get the chance), so that was the area that was most familiar to me - and I was most gratified that I worked out the coded message before Rosamund did :-) (That will make sense to you after you've read Moon In Leo).
PATHS OF EXILE - love, war, honour and betrayal in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria
Editor's Choice, Historical Novels Review, August 2009
Now available as e-book on Amazon Kindleand in Kindle, Epub (Nook, Sony Reader), Palm and other formats on Smashwords
Website: http://www.carlanayland.org
Blog: http://carlanayland.blogspot.com

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Thu November 24th, 2011, 10:16 am

Castlerigg is another stone circle worth visiting in Cumbria, it's only small too so it can be easily done as a side visit from somewhere else.
Currently reading: "The Comforts of Home" by Susan Hill

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Post by Carla » Thu November 24th, 2011, 4:19 pm

I do like Castlerigg. It has a wonderful position in the middle of a ring of fells, and it's a pleasant short walk from Keswick; one nice route is to combine it with a walk along the old railway line.
PATHS OF EXILE - love, war, honour and betrayal in Anglo-Saxon Northumbria
Editor's Choice, Historical Novels Review, August 2009
Now available as e-book on Amazon Kindleand in Kindle, Epub (Nook, Sony Reader), Palm and other formats on Smashwords
Website: http://www.carlanayland.org
Blog: http://carlanayland.blogspot.com

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Thu November 24th, 2011, 5:06 pm

[quote=""Carla""]I do like Castlerigg. It has a wonderful position in the middle of a ring of fells, and it's a pleasant short walk from Keswick; one nice route is to combine it with a walk along the old railway line.[/quote]

Yup,it would make a nice side trip from Keswick - I can never remember if it's near Keswick or Kendal :o - we went there after visiting Keswick and I agree, the setting is very dramatic. Just avoid the sheep poo! :rolleyes:
Currently reading: "The Comforts of Home" by Susan Hill

erechwydd
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Post by erechwydd » Thu November 24th, 2011, 5:31 pm

Thanks for the welcome, Wendy! Nice to meet you. :)

erechwydd
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Post by erechwydd » Thu November 24th, 2011, 6:05 pm

Somehow I reckon that once I've finished Sword at Sunset I'll be reading Moon in Leo next. ;) Alas, I've never done any fell-walking, though I'd like to. Most of my walking has been over the Wiltshire Downs, which are somewhat tamer, to say the least!

I've always thought Castlerigg looks fantastic (even if it isn't as big as Avebury... :p ), both the circle and its surrounding landscape, so it's a must as far as I'm concerned. :)
Just avoid the sheep poo! :rolleyes:
Oh well, even sheep poo has its uses - you can make paper from it, after all. Now there's a good sustainable source for all the paper involved in submission letters! Or maybe not.

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