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I've never been a PETA fan, but this tops it all

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Catherine Delors
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Post by Catherine Delors » Fri September 26th, 2008, 6:34 pm

Well, I have driven many, many times past the dairy farms of the Central Valley of California, and believe me, that will turn you off from non-organic milk.

I do believe it is torture to keep animals in such conditions, parked in 100 degree heat, stuck thigh deep in their own excrement for their entire lives. You can smell those operations from miles away and the stench is enough to make you sick. So that ad campaign about happy California cows frolicking in green pastures was totally shameful. I believe the California Dairy Farmers Association was sued for deceptive advertising, and got away with it.

The only way cows can survive under those conditions without rotting alive is by receiving mega-doses of antibiotics. After ingesting their milk, kids develop immunity to those life-saving medications. I am no PETA activist, but I draw the line there. I refuse to buy any dairy product that is not organic and antibiotic-free.

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Misfit
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Post by Misfit » Fri September 26th, 2008, 6:58 pm

[quote=""amyb""]I'll pass thanks. Suddenly I feel lactose intolerant.[/quote]


LOL. I am so glad I am not a dairy person. I hate milk and much as I love ice cream I've got enough on my hips as it is so I skip it. Calcium tabs work just fine.

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LCW
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Post by LCW » Fri September 26th, 2008, 7:07 pm

[quote=""Catherine Delors""]Well, I have driven many, many times past the dairy farms of the Central Valley of California, and believe me, that will turn you off from non-organic milk.

I do believe it is torture to keep animals in such conditions, parked in 100 degree heat, stuck thigh deep in their own excrement for their entire lives. You can smell those operations from miles away and the stench is enough to make you sick. So that ad campaign about happy California cows frolicking in green pastures was totally shameful. I believe the California Dairy Farmers Association was sued for deceptive advertising, and got away with it.

The only way cows can survive under those conditions without rotting alive is by receiving mega-doses of antibiotics. After ingesting their milk, kids develop immunity to those life-saving medications. I am no PETA activist, but I draw the line there. I refuse to buy any dairy product that is not organic and antibiotic-free.[/quote]

You are so right!! And if you go up the I-5 somewhere in Central CA there's a huge feed lot for beef cattle that stretches as far as the eye can see. You can smell for miles before and and after it. It's really pathetic to see!

Also the corn based diet most cows are fed makes them sick also. Corn is not a natural food for cows so it irritates their digestive system and causes illness, which of course they treat with massive amounts of antibiotics leading to resistant bugs and so on!

I wonder if the industrialized agriculture is a phenomenon specific to the USA or if it's a problem in other developed countries as well!
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Post by SonjaMarie » Fri September 26th, 2008, 7:12 pm

I don't drink a lot of milk, but my mom does like it's going out of style. I was at the store yesterday and saw that a gallon of organic milk was $6.29! I can't afford that even if I wanted to drink it! I'm bulking at paying over $3.30 for regular 2% gallon's for mom to mainly consume!

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Catherine Delors
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Post by Catherine Delors » Fri September 26th, 2008, 7:43 pm

Lila - I do believe, with globalization, industrial agriculture is a worldwide phenomenon. Maybe more prevalent in California and the UK, though. See the impact of mad cow and hoof-and-mouth cases there.

SonjaMarie - I am with you about the cost issue. Everytime I come back to the US, I am shocked by the price of basic groceries. When it comes to dairy products, I think we, as adults, can make the informed choice of ingesting antibiotics and growth hormones, but for kids the health consequences are far more worrisome. At the very least that's a public health issue that should be more discussed in the media.

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Post by Misfit » Fri September 26th, 2008, 8:35 pm

I've done some googling on this and found a story that has the original letter from PETA to B&J's. Just look where they got the idea from :eek:

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Catherine Delors
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Post by Catherine Delors » Fri September 26th, 2008, 8:41 pm

Thanks, Misfit, I'll stay away from those Swiss restaurants! ;)

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Post by Telynor » Fri September 26th, 2008, 11:33 pm

I find the PETA people to have entirely too much time on their hands, and are truly out there as far as reality is concerned. As someone who grew up having to cope with livestock -- a milk cow, chickens (who had the prosaic names of Stew, Enchilada, and Roast (to name a few), along with a big herd of sheep), I don't have a problem at all with eating meat. The human being has evolved from eating it, and domesticated animals to provide for that need. Yes, if a cow is not milk regularly and she is lactating, she gets mighty uncomfortable and she lets you know it. If you're clumsy or startle the cow she might kick, but most of the time talking softly and carefully will keep those hooves away from tender body parts.

I do know that the majority of farmers don't let their animals get overrun with excrement if they are smart. I was out shoveling various sorts of manure when I was growing up, and learning the smart way of taking care of animals, which meant doing a lot of cleanup and never skipping a day.

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Post by michellemoran » Sat September 27th, 2008, 12:46 am

As a strict vegetarian myself (and often vegan), I find that revolting.
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Catherine Delors
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Post by Catherine Delors » Sat September 27th, 2008, 7:55 am

Telynor - I grew up on my grandparents' farm in Normandy, and cows were indeed out to pasture in the fields. I have no problem with traditional farming, which does require hygienic conditions and careful animal husbandry.

But routine doses of antibios and growth hormones (which are, by the way, banned by European regulations) have changed the deal for agribusiness. Now apparently it makes economic sense to keep dairy cows tightly packed in feedlots, mired in dung. I wish schools organized field trips there for kids (and parents) to learn where the milk they drink comes from.

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