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Brainstorming words for...

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Alisha Marie Klapheke
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Brainstorming words for...

Post by Alisha Marie Klapheke » Tue July 26th, 2011, 8:09 pm

Okay, let's have some fun, please? I need some brainstorming help.

1. What would be a medieval English word (or what we can use that will suit) for a wine amphora?

2. Give me your favorite word that can used to mean "grow".

3. What do you look like when you're surprised?

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lauragill
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Post by lauragill » Tue July 26th, 2011, 8:22 pm

In medieval England, wine was kept in barrels and served in jugs/pitchers.

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MLE (Emily Cotton)
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Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Tue July 26th, 2011, 11:08 pm

Wineskins are a very ancient method of storing alcoholic beverages. I believe mead was made using skins. Most things English would use commonly available materials: wood, pottery, leather, and tin.

my favorite word for grow, if it is an animal, is to 'rear'. perhaps because when I was young, my Dad got good results from applying the 'board of education to the seat of all learning'. Not popular nowadays, but worked well for me. :p If it is a plant, I raise it. Speaking of dung, I pile it; and for a pile of cash, it's called increase. All of them together is husbandry.

When I'm really surprised, I'm gob-smacked. 'Gob' is old English for mouth; the word implies raising a hand suddenly to cover it. Another term with the same effect is drop-jawed.

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Post by Michy » Wed July 27th, 2011, 2:29 pm

There are endless synonyms for "grow" so, without knowing your context, it's hard to know which to suggest. I like the words "flourish" and "thrive."

I really don't know what I look like when I'm surprised, since I've never pulled out a mirror and checked. :) I do think my eyes open wider, though, and my eyebrows probably go up.

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Alisha Marie Klapheke
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Post by Alisha Marie Klapheke » Wed July 27th, 2011, 2:32 pm

Lauragill--yes, thank you. I have been using "pitcher" (thinking of a nice green glazed or more plain versions) quite a bit. Jug. That is one I need. Thank you. Basic and clean.

MLE--I knew they used wine skins, but would they have used such an item at an inn? So far, I've stuck with barrels and pottery.

Thanks for the good words. I do like the hand to mouth movement. For grow, I was actually meaning to use it metaphorically as in "the prickly argument grew/matured/blossomed into a small rebellion as..."

Michy--flourish and thrive are great, thanks! I'm with you on the brows and eyes wide. It's just that I feel that I've had too many widening eyes and flapping brows in my WIP...I was looking for something different. Thanks again, everyone!
Last edited by Alisha Marie Klapheke on Wed July 27th, 2011, 2:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: addition for Michy

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Michy
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Post by Michy » Wed July 27th, 2011, 7:51 pm

For the context in which you are using "grow", I think a metaphor likening their disagreement to a river, which gets larger as it flows and also picks up debris along the way. Or perhaps a tornado. Something that is negative (because a disagreement is negative) but which grows larger as it progresses and also picks up "stuff" along the way.

Of course, that would require more than one word. But if you're looking for a single word, how about "swell." It signifies growth, but not necessarily in a good way.

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Post by LoveHistory » Wed July 27th, 2011, 9:11 pm

I've seen jar of wine used. A large earthenware jar would hold quite a bit of it, I would think. Also cask. Don't know that they are Middle English but I've read them. Barrels are probably a better bet.

Grew: amplified, increased, ballooned (probably won't work for the time period), exploded, expanded, heightened.

For surprise there's the blank stare, a glazed over look, a hand pressed to the heart area, fainting, disbelief sometimes indicated by asking for something to be repeated, suddenly needing to sit down. A pleasant surprise can bring a huge smile or a hug. An unpleasant surprise can cause a narrowing of eyes and maybe searching for a blunt object to use, swinging fists, flying small objects. Either type can cause in increase of pulse or a rapid indrawing of breath. Here's one more reaction: laughter. No matter the surprise anyone can crack up, especially at inopportune moments. Also don't forget blinking. I'm pretty sure I blink a few times in rapid succession when I'm surprised by something.

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Post by SGM » Wed July 27th, 2011, 9:24 pm

[quote=""Alisha Marie Klapheke""]MLE--I knew they used wine skins, but would they have used such an item at an inn? So far, I've stuck with barrels and pottery.
[/quote]

Goblets for wine and tankards for ale in taverns, inns and alehouses. I enjoy references to "sack" which I think is a fortified wine and common enough in late middle ages and early modern times.
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Post by Michy » Wed July 27th, 2011, 10:19 pm

I just read a small NF book about England circa 1000, and it said that mead was a far more common drink at that time than wine (I think this was due to the fact that the English climate is not all that conducive to grape-growing. I can double-check this when I get home if you want). Mead -- which is made from fermented honey -- was more common and far more potent.

I'm not sure exactly what time frame you're working with, but you might want to keep that in mind.

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Post by annis » Thu July 28th, 2011, 3:38 am

Plus ale and beer- wine was generally imported so expensive.

The Regia Anglorum website is a good resource for all things Anglo-Saxon. This is the link to the article on food and drink. See under Fruit and Vegetables for info on beverages. There's even an article on how beer was brewed in the Crafts and Everyday Life section.

Index of articles on various subjects here:
http://www.regia.org/listings.htm

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