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Game of Thrones: Books

rebecca
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Post by rebecca » Tue September 6th, 2011, 3:58 am

I really liked the first book, GOT but in succeeding books I do tend to get confused with all the new characters some of whom simply disappear and the reader is left wondering why bother introducing them in the first place?(but that is probably my problem).

I am now halfway through DWD and I still have a problem with Dany..I don't like the character and find her tedious...But it is interesting that now the 'red lady or the witch lady' has her own chapters.

I have to admit as I read these books, I thank God that Martin conjured up Tyrion from his extraordinary imagination. I love Tyrion's black humour and the book really does need some humour. That said, I do miss reading Jaime and I am still waiting for Cersei to get her comuppance. :D

Susan--"reference (unless I missed it) to how similar this is the to Wars of the Roses.."

The books do have similarites with the War of the Roses and I do wonder if the author had that in mind when he first began this series? Also with a dash of Tudor(all those beheadings). But I don't want to give the plot away.
Susan gird yourself for the 3rd book...I think that's the one I threw across the room! You'll understand why when you get there. Good luck with school.

Brenna, how is your husband doing? What book is he on now?

Mythica--Finished the third book. Holy crap.

*nods head knowingly* a humdinger wasn't it?

I do hope that Martin now hurries himself up a bit. I do not want to wait 6 years for the next installment.

Bec :)

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Tue September 6th, 2011, 9:03 am

Don't know if it's the same in the US but in the UK Book 3 is split into 2 separate books, so I'd like to ask - whereabouts in the book (s) does the OMG stuff happen - in the early part (which would make it part 1) or the later part (which would make it part 2), or is it the middle, which would of course make it both parts!
Currently reading: "Longstone" by L J Ross

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Brenna
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Post by Brenna » Tue September 6th, 2011, 1:35 pm

The last part of your second part of book 3. So the end.

Bec-my husband is about halfway through book 3. He is being awfully quiet, so I'm patiently waiting to hear the book make a huge thud as it hits the wall.
Brenna

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Tue September 6th, 2011, 1:57 pm

Thanks Brenna.
Currently reading: "Longstone" by L J Ross

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Ludmilla
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Post by Ludmilla » Tue September 6th, 2011, 2:21 pm

[quote=""rebecca""]Susan--"reference (unless I missed it) to how similar this is the to Wars of the Roses.."
[/quote]

Personally, I think the parallels to the Wars of the Roses are just a starting off point -- largely superficial, so therefore shouldn't be taken too literally -- for creating the atmosphere of dynastic power struggles. Medieval societies are a common template for worldbuilding in fantasy works. You could find parallels to other societies and centuries of power struggles in human history. Martin has created a world we're familiar with but still uniquely his own and without forsaking magic or the fantastical qualities we expect in a fantasy. What really sets Martin's worldbuilding apart is the complexity and vast scope that he's given to his world. Even when you find a real world parallel to a character or event in the book, you'll find unique differences as well. You can't pin Martin down. As far as influences are concerned, the incestuous relationships and ever-changing alliances remind me a bit of the Gesta Danorum.

rebecca
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Post by rebecca » Wed September 7th, 2011, 1:38 am

Brenna--"my husband is about halfway through book 3. He is being awfully quiet, so I'm patiently waiting to hear the book make a huge thud as it hits the wall."

Ah huh,it will happen. I suppose it was the fact that I simply did not see it coming....Poor hubby I do feel for him once he gets there...It's a shocker! :eek:

Feels for Madeleine too once she reaches that part...be prepared to feel enraged! :p And do tell us what you feel about it? :)

When it comes to the War of the Roses....I think Martin may have got his inspiration from that conflict but used it only as a template as he built his own unique world of dragons and witchcraft, prophets and other creatures. Not everything in the book leaves me enthralled, as there are characters who bore me rigid and I tend to skim those chapters. But all in all it is worth the read even though at times I have had to really persevere with the books and its oddball characters.
The real genius of Martin is he makes you care about his characters, he fleshes them out so well, that they almost take life in your imagination. Everthing is there villainy, pathos, tragedy, humour and he is able to use words to paint his vista and make it real to the reader, hence you can't stop reading even when at times one becomes irate at certain twists and turns of his characters. He is a real genius...but I still wish he had condensed his books into four :D then I'd know who won the 'Game of Thrones. :D

Bec :)

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Mythica
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Post by Mythica » Wed September 7th, 2011, 7:41 am

[quote=""Madeleine""]Don't know if it's the same in the US but in the UK Book 3 is split into 2 separate books, so I'd like to ask - whereabouts in the book (s) does the OMG stuff happen - in the early part (which would make it part 1) or the later part (which would make it part 2), or is it the middle, which would of course make it both parts![/quote]

I was reading the US version - there's a few things that made me think "Holy crap" but I think they were all in the second half. The ending especially.

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Madeleine
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Post by Madeleine » Wed September 7th, 2011, 8:45 am

thanks Mythica and Rebecca - I'm completely intrigued now! At the moment I've only read the first book, so might have to bump these up the tbr piles.
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sweetpotatoboy
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Post by sweetpotatoboy » Wed September 7th, 2011, 11:55 am

Just a general comment to say that I'm glad that this thread has provided a little balance on responses to these books.

So far, I've only read the first book, quite recently after several years of hearing how absolutely amazing this series was. I enjoyed GoT and certainly found it a cut above much of the fantasy I've read (admitttedly, I stopped reading much fantasy a while back). But I didn't think it reinvented the wheel that much: the certain characterisations and selected set pieces were definitely impressive. Overall, I found it pretty conventional for the fantasy genre, though. I guess the ambitious scope of the whole thing is where it stands out, but perhaps it's his over-ambitiousness that seems to be behind some of the problems here.

Either way, his success is deserved, I feel, but it's good to get to see some caveats to the adulation I'd seen before.

rebecca
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Post by rebecca » Thu September 8th, 2011, 2:22 am

Madeleine--"I'm completely intrigued now! At the moment I've only read the first book, so might have to bump these up the tbr piles..."

I would really encourage you to continue reading the GOT books but though I encourage you I also warn you....You willl probably have to take a break once you read the explosive third book. I know I did and then I returned to Martin with a better mind set. The third book enthralled me but paradoxically it also infuriated me and so I really needed to take that break and come back with a fresh and more open mind.

sweetpotatoboy--"guess the ambitious scope of the whole thing is where it stands out, but perhaps it's his over-ambitiousness that seems to be behind some of the problems here....
Either way, his success is deserved, I feel, but it's good to get to see some caveats to the adulation I'd seen before."


I have a confession to make. This is my first venture into the fantasy genre(I have not even read LOTR:eek :) . It was the first book, GOT which really drew me in and I wonder too if it was because it was the easier read. Martin set out the characters and the landscape in such a way that the reader is simply hooked and you have to find out what happens to them. But as you said I think at times he is his own worst enemy when he goes off course and meanders into different area's which never reach a conclusion and then he re-focuses and you are back with the main characters. Why he does this is anyone's guess.
I agree with you though, he does deserve his success, but I do wish he would use a little discipline and not invent any more characters who have nothing to do with the story or different plot lines.

I also hope he moves it along and is able to release 'Winds of Winter' in 2013....I know it's probably wishful thinking..sigh.

Bec :)

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