Welcome to the Historical Fiction Online forums: a friendly place to discuss, review and discover historical fiction.
If this is your first visit, please be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above.
You will have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed.
To start viewing posts, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

What are you reading? July 2011

Retired Threads
User avatar
fljustice
Bibliophile
Posts: 1995
Joined: March 2010
Location: Brooklyn, NY
Contact:

Post by fljustice » Wed July 6th, 2011, 3:43 pm

[quote=""Susan""]YA The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan, the first in the Percy Jackson series, since some of my students read these books.[/quote]

I read that series last summer. An obvious Harry Potter clone, but well done; kept my interest; impressive mythological research!
Faith L. Justice, Author Website
Image

User avatar
Vanessa
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4226
Joined: August 2008
Currently reading: The Farm at the Edge of the World by Sarah Vaughan
Interest in HF: The first historical novel I read was Katherine by Anya Seton and this sparked off my interest in this genre.
Favourite HF book: Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell!
Preferred HF: Any
Location: North Yorkshire, UK

Post by Vanessa » Wed July 6th, 2011, 3:51 pm

I'm just about to start The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse by Robert Rankin - it's a thriller set in Toy City! Not sure it's my genre, but I shall give it a go.
currently reading: My Books on Goodreads

Books are mirrors, you only see in them what you already have inside you ~ The Shadow of the Wind

User avatar
Susan
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3746
Joined: August 2008
Location: New Jersey, USA

Post by Susan » Wed July 6th, 2011, 7:30 pm

[quote=""fljustice""]I read that series last summer. An obvious Harry Potter clone, but well done; kept my interest; impressive mythological research![/quote]

I may wind up reading all the books in the series. I've always loved Greek mythology.
~Susan~
~Unofficial Royalty~
Royal news updated daily, information and discussion about royalty past and present
http://www.unofficialroyalty.com/

User avatar
EC2
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3661
Joined: August 2008
Location: Nottingham UK
Contact:

Post by EC2 » Wed July 6th, 2011, 8:55 pm

An ARC of Lionheart by SKP - big smile!
Les proz e les vassals
Souvent entre piez de chevals
Kar ja li coard n’I chasront

'The Brave and the valiant
Are always to be found between the hooves of horses
For never will cowards fall down there.'

Histoire de Guillaume le Mareschal

www.elizabethchadwick.com

annis
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 4585
Joined: August 2008

Post by annis » Wed July 6th, 2011, 9:17 pm

Posted by Ash
annis, like you, I was really surprised by A Reliable Wife. I was expecting just the usual murder mystery. I loved this; just when I thought I knew what was happening, the rug was pulled out from under me again! We are reading that this month for our book group, its going to be an interesting discussion esp as many in the group have trouble liking the book if they don't like the main character. I don't think any of them are likable, but boy are they interesting!
Yes, the main trio of characters all suffer from a sense of isolation, a disconnectedness clearly symptomatic of a more general sense of malaise and dislocation as traditional patterns of communal co-operation and work to the seasonal rhythms of the land are disrupted in the move to a more urbanised, industrial, "progressive" society (all exacerbated by seasonal affective disorder!). Goolrick captures the inner lives of his characters brilliantly, for example ,"sometimes his (Truitt's) loneliness was like a fire beneath his skin. Sometimes he had thought of taking his razor and slicing his own flesh, peeling back the skin that would not stop burning." Yet our pity is moderated by the fact that all these characters are motivated by extreme selfishness - it's all about "me", self-gratification. Who will be the winner and who the sacrifice in their power struggle is the mystery.
Last edited by annis on Wed July 6th, 2011, 10:09 pm, edited 3 times in total.

Ash
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 2475
Joined: August 2008
Location: Arizona, USA

Post by Ash » Wed July 6th, 2011, 10:46 pm

Yes, the main trio of characters all suffer from a sense of isolation, a disconnectedness clearly symptomatic of a more general sense of malaise and dislocation as traditional patterns of communal co-operation and work to the seasonal rhythms of the land are disrupted in the move to a more urbanised, industrial, "progressive" society (all exacerbated by seasonal affective disorder!).
LOL, wow, I'm impressed :) And I very much agree with your last statement. Thats what makes me think some members of the bookclub are going to not like this book at all.

User avatar
javagirl
Reader
Posts: 118
Joined: May 2009
Location: Florida

Post by javagirl » Thu July 7th, 2011, 3:39 am

[quote=""Misfit""]Redeeming Love by Francine Rivers[/quote]

I ended up really liking Redeeming Love, although my first thought when I started (and it was my first book by the author) was something along the lines of "this author's use of language and writing style just isn't very impressive'. But, once I got into the story and characters, I felt that she was a great story teller. I found it inspiring. I even consider it to be one I might read again some day, and I don't have a very long list of those.

Hope you enjoy.

User avatar
MLE (Emily Cotton)
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 3562
Joined: August 2008
Interest in HF: started in childhood with the classics, which, IMHO are HF even if they were contemporary when written.
Favourite HF book: Prince of Foxes, by Samuel Shellabarger
Preferred HF: Currently prefer 1600 and earlier, but I'll read anything that keeps me turning the page.
Location: California Bay Area

Post by MLE (Emily Cotton) » Thu July 7th, 2011, 4:25 am

Redeeming Love is one of those books that sticks with you--one of the perennial bestsellers in Inspirational Fiction. I'm always amused to think that Tyndale wouldn't publish it. "Too much sex, too dark" was their original comment. Bet they regret that now!

User avatar
Amanda
Compulsive Reader
Posts: 910
Joined: August 2008
Location: Sydney, Australia

Post by Amanda » Thu July 7th, 2011, 6:38 am

I just started Quality of Mercy by Faye Kellerman.

User avatar
Misfit
Bibliomaniac
Posts: 9581
Joined: August 2008
Location: Seattle, WA

Post by Misfit » Thu July 7th, 2011, 11:01 am

[quote=""javagirl""]I ended up really liking Redeeming Love, although my first thought when I started (and it was my first book by the author) was something along the lines of "this author's use of language and writing style just isn't very impressive'. But, once I got into the story and characters, I felt that she was a great story teller. I found it inspiring. I even consider it to be one I might read again some day, and I don't have a very long list of those.

Hope you enjoy.[/quote]
Redeeming Love is one of those books that sticks with you--one of the perennial bestsellers in Inspirational Fiction. I'm always amused to think that Tyndale wouldn't publish it. "Too much sex, too dark" was their original comment. Bet they regret that now!
Thanks for the encouragement. I know that young gal's been through a lot, but I do so want to strangle her at times...

Plus I keep getting side tracked by the terribly silly and oftentimes dire Lord Protector. A *cough* alternative history about the fate of the princes in the tower. Ya'll just wouldn't believe some of what's happening. :eek: :D
At home with a good book and the cat...
...is the only place I want to be

Locked

Return to “Archives”